Search results

1 – 10 of over 22000
Article
Publication date: 1 August 2003

Peter Jones, Daphne Comfort and David Hillier

Acknowledges there is an increasing recognition that corporate retail power is the driving force for the supply chain. States a variety of large shopping developments in…

2902

Abstract

Acknowledges there is an increasing recognition that corporate retail power is the driving force for the supply chain. States a variety of large shopping developments in out of town and edge of town locations, plus continued construction and redevelopment of shopping centres within town and city centres, provide a potential physical pointer regarding retail corporate power. Concludes that major retail centres seem to be prioritised above more informal retail activities, such as street traders.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2000

Stein Inge Nesvag

Presents findings from a case study looking at African medicine vendors in Durban, South Africa. Compares the culturally repressive apartheid period with the…

Abstract

Presents findings from a case study looking at African medicine vendors in Durban, South Africa. Compares the culturally repressive apartheid period with the post‐apartheid explosion of self‐realization of the African population. Shows that street vending is still seen as an eyesore and a problem but still plays an important role in the post‐apartheid era as a form of resistance to simplistic African policies.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 20 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 July 2015

Sam Sarpong and Ibrahim B. Nabubie

The paper aims to focus on how the dualism “petty trading and traffic” exacerbates the development of a social bond among traders from various communities and ethnic…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to focus on how the dualism “petty trading and traffic” exacerbates the development of a social bond among traders from various communities and ethnic groups in Ghana. As understood in their normal innocuous sense, “traffic and petty trading” independently mark off two generally distinguishable exclusive partners. However, both petty trading and traffic now denote essential aspects of contemporary Ghana’s new social order shared uniquely among informal traders. The paper dilates on this phenomenon.

Design/methodology/approach

The theory underpinning this study is social constructionism. Social constructionism is part of a post-modern understanding of the nature of reality. It is a strand of sociology, pertaining to the ways in which social phenomena are created, institutionalised and made into tradition by humans. The core idea of constructionism, therefore, is that some social agent produces or controls some object. ’s (1967) situational constraints thesis also provides an important element to this paper. The thesis maintains that the poor in society are constrained by the facts of their situation; hence, the poor are unable to translate many of their ideals into reality in view of the considerable poverty that engulfs them. The thesis, reiterates that once the constraints of poverty are removed, the poor would have no difficulty adopting mainstream behavioural patterns and seizing available opportunities. The thesis is significant in exploring the objectives of this paper.

Findings

The paper finds that petty trading has given its adherents a new wave of life. The picture that emerges is that, although street hawkers are seen as a nuisance, a failure in society and lacking knowledge, they have become mindful of what society thinks about them. As a result, some have devised means to cope with what they do and also to find new ways to address the challenges facing them. The findings confirmed that people are self-reflexive beings and that they shape their own behaviour despite the influence of a variety of social factors that may constrain them. The study found that street hawkers have found a way to make life more meaningful for themselves than are actually perceived.

Originality/value

The paper seeks to discover the daily lives of petty traders, which have been stealthily tied in to urban development and planning. It brings a new dimension to the issue of petty trading. The fundamental argument of the paper is that the multidimensional nature of poverty is leading petty traders to a new consciousness which bodes well for them. These traders are shaping their own behaviour despite the influence of a variety of social factors that may constrain them. The social bond and interrelationship that permeate their working relationship has created a basis for which they now forge close ties that promote an inclusion from the exclusion that they are generally enjoined to.

Details

Society and Business Review, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5680

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 July 2020

Saori Kashihara

This study aims to redefine the urban heritage value of trade streets in Hanoi's Ancient Quarter (AQ) and propose an expanded notion of the “historicity” found through…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to redefine the urban heritage value of trade streets in Hanoi's Ancient Quarter (AQ) and propose an expanded notion of the “historicity” found through intangible cultural heritage (ICH).

Design/methodology/approach

A longitudinal analysis was conducted to examine the historical transitions of trade streets, thereby providing an alternative value perspective for considering the area's conservation management. The trade streets were specifically analysed from the pre-colonial era to 2017 using past survey data concerning the distribution and concentration of trade types, statistical documents from the colonial era and recent fieldwork data from investigations into 79 trade streets, thus identifying seven patterns of change.

Findings

Individual trade streets contribute to the unique identities of their respective streets while collectively providing experiential value through the overall variety and density of trade types. Further, the value of modernised trade streets can be found in their support of the area's systemic and experiential values.

Practical implications

Current management approaches should shift to include non-traditional trade streets that have experienced gradual changes or retained specific businesses for long periods of time.

Originality/value

This was the first study to conduct a longitudinal analysis of AQ trading with partial support from statistical data. It explored an expanded way of interpreting historicity from the viewpoint of dynamic ICH along the two axes of pace and intensity by tracing changes in commercial activities over time.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 August 2018

Shen (Lamson) Lin

The purpose of this paper is to explore resilience strategies of Chinese street vendors in a shifted regulatory policy environment from a strength-based and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore resilience strategies of Chinese street vendors in a shifted regulatory policy environment from a strength-based and entrepreneurial perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing upon nine in-depth interviews and naturalistic observations in an urban village of Guangzhou, China, the study empirically investigates how unregulated sidewalk-based hawkers struggle to survive against socioeconomic adversities compared with regulated vendors’ operations in a legitimate transitional market.

Findings

Mirroring a sub-group of rural-to-urban migrants, street vendors espouse subtle strategies centering on purposefulness, resourcefulness and hardiness, which are instantiated through family obligation, sales tactics, merchandising techniques, technology application, trading flexibility, moral sentiment and assistance network. As such, street entrepreneurs are both enacting and constructing resilience in response to specific challenging contexts including impoverishment, operating cost inflation, contingent loss, fierce competition, market uncertainty, intensive workloads, municipal inspection and arbitrary governance practice of village cooperative organization.

Research limitations/implications

Notwithstanding its limited generalizability, the result sheds light on crystallization of street vendors’ resilience and informs social services and policy remedies.

Originality/value

The study provides a frame of reference to examine the interplay of resilience theory from psychology and entrepreneurship thesis from the field of business management by adding new evidence to the research on “entrepreneurial resilience” and potentially serves as a catalyst to enrich existing literature with an integrated perspective to comprehend the coping process of these necessity-driven micro-enterprise operators. The antagonistic understanding of informal economy is so predominating that it obscures structural oppression undermining social justice, whereas the spirit of self-reliance among street entrepreneurs is ought to be respected.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 38 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

Ray Bromley

Provide a general contemporary overview of street vending around the world, focusing on the major issues underlying its permanence as a phenomenon, and the ambivalent…

4663

Abstract

Provide a general contemporary overview of street vending around the world, focusing on the major issues underlying its permanence as a phenomenon, and the ambivalent attitudes displayed towards it by governments and off‐street business communities. Focuses on street vendors as an occupational group ad includes arguments for and against their existence, the impact of their geographical and economic location, and role of the government.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 20 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 July 2008

Neil Fraser

The purpose of this paper is to show the changes to date between the apartheid (ideological) and democratic use and management of public space. The abolition of apartheid…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show the changes to date between the apartheid (ideological) and democratic use and management of public space. The abolition of apartheid laws in urban areas led to a great deal of contestation for space and also to new forms of management of public space.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper looks briefly at the background which led to public space being “reserved” on a racial basis. It then examines examples of the contestation for space that developed with the relaxation and, finally, abolition of apartheid legislation. It finally provides and discusses some of the solutions that have developed in both the use and management of public space.

Findings

Little has been practically resolved in relation to contestation over various aspects of urban public space. Where public space interventions have been private sector led, such interventions are not without their own difficulties.

Research limitations/implications

Generally the paper confines itself to Johannesburg. The paper relies on the personal experience of the author and research of written material – time constraints have not permitted research through questionnaires.

Practical implications

The practical implications of the results to date are summarised and recommendations made for application to other South African towns and cities.

Originality/value

Relatively little is available on the practical applications of the subject matter in South Africa. The paper could be of value in developing further debates, both in South Africa and in world cities subject to mass immigration.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 28 May 2020

Abbas Karaağaçli

Afghanistan has been a country that has a long history of combating against the wars, civil and otherwise, and where the people, who escape from the terrorist…

Abstract

Afghanistan has been a country that has a long history of combating against the wars, civil and otherwise, and where the people, who escape from the terrorist organisations and the vulnerable state authority, predominantly migrate to its capital. The number of people, who leave their lands and possessions behind just to reach the capital city of Kabul, reaches to millions. Those people, who escaped from the oppression, persecution and terror, make their living as street vendors. The number of people, who live by working as street vendors and who seriously contribute to the national economy, is considerably high.

In this study, in addition to the positive contributions of the street trade on the national economy, employment and socio-cultural life, its positive aspects that are reflected upon the security, health and culture and the problems and ways to solve those problems shall be identified.

Details

Global Street Economy and Micro Entrepreneurship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-503-0

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2021

Delly Mahachi Chatibura

The purpose of this study is to review the critical success factors (CSFs) of street food destinations, given the limited attention awarded to such research in the food…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to review the critical success factors (CSFs) of street food destinations, given the limited attention awarded to such research in the food and beverage sector.

Design/methodology/approach

An interpretivist approach was used to merge CSFs from street vending and culinary tourism perspectives, to develop a draft framework for analysing CSFs for street food destinations. In total, 64 cities that appeared in the first 20 webpage results of a Google search, using 4 keywords, formed the population. A purposive sample of seven destinations (Bangkok, Marrakesh, Mexico City, Istanbul, Hong Kong, Portland and Singapore City) was used. A content analysis method was used to review webpages, journal articles and government reports of the destinations, based on the modified list of CSFs.

Findings

The availability of diverse street food resources and cultures, coupled with rich historic city cores that sustain street food vending, in some destinations, are very important CSFs. The presence and extent of regulatory enforcement were also key in others. Empirical research is, however, required to corroborate the draft framework to create a body of knowledge for further research in the field.

Originality/value

The study examines how leading street food destinations have instituted the CSFs required for street food provision.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 August 2010

Lantana M. Usman

The purpose of this paper is to provide a qualitative explanation, understanding, and policy suggestions on the socio‐economic causes, effects, and challenges facing…

1352

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a qualitative explanation, understanding, and policy suggestions on the socio‐economic causes, effects, and challenges facing nomadic rural girls' street hawking in cities of Northern Nigeria. The aim is to present the paper as a source of literature that will serve as a future document in formulating inclusive policies for the girls as explained in the section on educational policy options.

Design/methodology/approach

Research orientation and design involved qualitative phenomenology that explored girls' street hawking experiences. Study sites included three major Nigerian cities and three villages of the girls. Purposeful sampling was used to select 20 girls between ages eight and 15 and female parents as primary participants, while two traditional and religious leaders from each of the villages, and one administrator of the local state nomadic education commission served as secondary participants. Snowball samples of three male parents of the girls in each village were used as part of data validity. Data collection technique involved unstructured focus group interviews, participant observations, and video recording of the girls at home, at markets, and at streets in the cities. Ethical issues were addressed by obtaining oral and written consent of participants orally and in writing using the native language for clarity and understanding of their role. Data analysis of interview involved transcription and the repeated reading of the transcripts that identified major themes. Observational data were converted to field notes and analyzed for patterns of ideas that support major themes of the analyzed interview data for validity. Triangulation process of checking validity was used with sample of snowball participants as state educational administrators of nomadic education, religious leaders, amongst others.

Findings

Major findings are presented as themes on major economic causes of the girls' street hawking of dairy products as a part of family gender division of labor, poverty level of most families, preparing girls for self‐reliance and economic independence, and to augment family income. Social causes include Islamic religious pressure of teaching youth self‐reliance in preparation for early marriage, to finance wedding expenses, to acquire material possessions as child brides, for family honor, to accrue income to maintain their bodily aesthetic needs, group street hawking as a means to girls socialization, and exposing girls to suitors as future husbands, amongst others. Challenges facing the girls include lack of safety, exposure to forms of abuse, and being left behind in basic literacy, amongst others.

Originality/value

This paper is of significant value due to its novelty. It will serve as primary literature on minority West African pastoral girls' impact on rural‐urban migration, their challenges, and their position in the current world social policy of the Department for International Development and UNICEF Girls Education Project.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 37 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 22000