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Book part
Publication date: 20 July 2017

Lars U. Johnson, Cody J. Bok, Tiffany Bisbey and L. A. Witt

Decision-making in human resources management is done at both the micro and macro level of organizations. Unfortunately, the decisions at each level are often executed…

Abstract

Decision-making in human resources management is done at both the micro and macro level of organizations. Unfortunately, the decisions at each level are often executed without consideration of the other, and current theory reflects this issue. In response to a call for integration of micro- and macro-level processes by Huselid and Becker (2011), we review the extant literature on strategic human resources and high-performance work systems to provide recommendations for both research and practice. We aimed to contribute to the literature by proposing the incorporation of the situation awareness literature into the high-performance work systems framework to encourage the alignment of human resources efforts. In addition, we provide practical recommendations for integrating situation awareness and strategic decision-making. We discuss a process for the employment of situation awareness in organizations that might not only streamline human resources management but also result in more effective decisions. Additional considerations include implications for teams, boundary conditions (e.g., individual differences), and measurement.

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Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-709-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1996

E. Frank Harrison

Posits that a process perspective on strategic decision making is more likely to yield a successful outcome. Conceives the strategic decision‐making process as a composite…

Abstract

Posits that a process perspective on strategic decision making is more likely to yield a successful outcome. Conceives the strategic decision‐making process as a composite of the concept of strategic gap and the managerial decision‐making process. Presents six examples of real‐world strategic decision in support of a process approach to the making and implementing of such decisions. The evidence in support of a process perspective on strategic decision making suggests a need for further research and exposition of this critically important subject.

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Management Decision, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 2 May 2008

Mahmood Nooraie

The purpose of this paper is to identify the role of the rationality of the strategic decision‐making process between decision magnitude of impact and the quality of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the role of the rationality of the strategic decision‐making process between decision magnitude of impact and the quality of the decision process output.

Design/methodology/approach

From analysis of alternative research approaches, a field survey seems to be the most appropriate methodological choice. This is a field study of real strategic decision‐making process rather than an artificial setting. The questionnaire consists of items measuring the variables of primary interest; namely the independent, mediator, and dependent variables. The study was conducted in Pinang, Malaysia, involving small, medium, and large‐sized private manufacturing firms. To test and eliminate ambiguous or biased items and to improve the format, both for ease of understanding and to facilitate data analysis, a pilot study was conducted by computing Cronbach's reliability alpha.

Findings

The results of regression analysis indicate that the decision magnitude of impact is significantly associated with the level of rationality in the decision‐making process. The results of hierarchical regression analyses indicate that the extent of rationality in the decision‐making process is able to significantly change the total variations in the decision‐ making quality explained by magnitude of impact.

Research limitations/implications

The complex nature of strategic decision‐making process as a research topic places limitations on this study, particularly in the area of sample selection and data availability and collection. The major sample selection at the manufacturing firms is difficult because a firm's perception in terms of strategic decisions may not be the same, thus it is not easy to ascertain relevant sample characteristics.

Practical implications

Findings of this study indicate that a better quality decision is achieved through a rational process. Thus, organizations should encourage greater use of rationality in the decision‐making process, especially when the decision that is going to be made has more impact on the various parts of the organization or it is a strategic decision.

Originality/value

This study is believed to be the first to test the mediating impact of rationality of the strategic decision‐making process. This study was carried out among Malaysian manufacturing firms, and therefore comparison of its results to the findings in other countries may suggest the influence of other factors such as ideology, belief, and culture on strategic decision‐making processes. This in turn may open up a promising avenue for future research.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 46 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2000

Martha Mador

The research into SME”s is often presented as quite distinct from strategy or general management research. This paper examines the literature on Strategic Decision Making

Abstract

The research into SME”s is often presented as quite distinct from strategy or general management research. This paper examines the literature on Strategic Decision Making (SDM) process, drawing in some findings from the SME sector which show some key similarities. The paper makes proposals for research into SDM processes in SME’s, which would clarify both the general management theory and theory relating to SME’s.

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Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2009

Said Elbanna and Rabia Naguib

The purpose of this paper is to explore the influence of two aspects of firm performance: financial and business performance and organizational effectiveness, on three…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the influence of two aspects of firm performance: financial and business performance and organizational effectiveness, on three dimensions of the strategic decision‐making process, rationality, intuition, and political behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical study goes well beyond the common anecdotal observations or reflections on strategic decision‐making by utilizing a mixed‐methods approach. Based on a multi‐method field study, 286 Egyptian managers who participate in making strategic decisions are surveyed; and 36 semi‐structured interviews are conducted.

Findings

The results suggest that strategic decision‐making in high‐performing firms is more rational and less intuitive and political. Interestingly, they also show that organizational effectiveness is a stronger predictor of strategic decision‐making process dimensions than of financial and business performance.

Research limitations/implications

In Egypt, a widespread suspicion of academic research adds to the frequent difficulty of obtaining completed questionnaires from more than one senior manager in a company. Moreover, because of the difficulty of collecting objective financial data, subjective measures are used to gauge performance. Further research should test the generalizability of our results in narrowly defined samples, e.g. the banking industry or the automotive industry.

Practical implications

The results highlight the importance of performance in strategic decision making and seem to support the “culture free” argument advancing the position that cultural differences may not have a significant impact on the influence of performance on the strategic decision‐making process.

Originality/value

Although scholars have posited organizational performance as an important contextual variable influencing the process of strategic decision making, this influence is not well understood or articulated, especially in the Egyptian setting. This paper contributes to filling this gap.

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International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 58 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2007

Shawnta S. Friday‐Stroud and J. Scott Sutterfield

The purpose of this paper is to present a conceptual framework for merging the strategic management process, the managerial decision‐making process and the six‐sigma…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a conceptual framework for merging the strategic management process, the managerial decision‐making process and the six‐sigma process into a single, unified decision model.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology involves each of the three decision‐making processes, noting their similarities and differences, and arguing from the similarities that a single unified model will result in superior decisions.

Findings

The findings were that a single, unified model is possible and the resulting model is presented in the paper.

Research limitations/implications

Since this research results in a conceptual model only, it remains to be tested in actual practice. This testing is intended for a later paper.

Practical implications

If the testing of the model in practice results in superior decisions, the practical implications of the paper would be use of the Friday‐Stroud/Sutterfield model in practice for better management decisions.

Originality/value

The paper presents an original model, which results from merging the three‐decision‐making process.

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 19 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

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Article
Publication date: 11 November 2020

Maqsood Ahmad, Syed Zulfiqar Ali Shah and Yasar Abbass

This article aims to clarify the mechanism by which heuristic-driven biases influence the entrepreneurial strategic decision-making in an emerging economy.

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to clarify the mechanism by which heuristic-driven biases influence the entrepreneurial strategic decision-making in an emerging economy.

Design/methodology/approach

Entrepreneurs' heuristic-driven biases have been measured using a questionnaire, comprising numerous items, including indicators of entrepreneurial strategic decision-making. To examine the relationship between heuristic-driven biases and entrepreneurial strategic decision-making process, a 5-point Likert scale questionnaire has been used to collect data from the sample of 169 entrepreneurs who operate in small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). The collected data were analyzed using SPSS and Amos graphics software. Hypotheses were tested using structural equation modeling (SEM) technique.

Findings

The article provides empirical insights into the relationship between heuristic-driven biases and entrepreneurial strategic decision-making. The results suggest that heuristic-driven biases (anchoring and adjustment, representativeness, availability and overconfidence) have a markedly negative influence on the strategic decisions made by entrepreneurs in emerging markets. It means that heuristic-driven biases can impair the quality of the entrepreneurial strategic decision-making process.

Practical implications

The article encourages entrepreneurs to avoid relying on cognitive heuristics or their feelings when making strategic decisions. It provides awareness and understanding of heuristic-driven biases in entrepreneurial strategic decisions, which could be very useful for business actors such as entrepreneurs, managers and entire organizations. Understanding regarding the role of heuristic-driven biases in entrepreneurial strategic decisions may help entrepreneurs to improve the quality of their decision-making. They can improve the quality of their decision-making by recognizing their behavioral biases and errors of judgment, to which we are all prone, resulting in a more appropriate selection of entrepreneurial opportunities.

Originality/value

The current study is the first to focus on links between heuristic-driven bias and the entrepreneurial strategic decision-making in Pakistan—an emerging economy. This article enhanced the understanding of the role that heuristic-driven bias plays in the entrepreneurial strategic decisions and more importantly, it went some way toward enhancing understanding of behavioral aspects and their influence on entrepreneurial strategic decision-making in an emerging market. It also adds to the literature in the area of entrepreneurial management specifically the role of heuristics in entrepreneurial strategic decision-making; this field is in its initial stage, even in developed countries, while, in developing countries, little work has been done.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 59 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2001

E. Frank Harrison and Monique A. Pelletier

The purpose of this article is to extend and reinforce previous research intended to demonstrate that a process model of decision making is conducive to strategic decision…

Abstract

The purpose of this article is to extend and reinforce previous research intended to demonstrate that a process model of decision making is conducive to strategic decision success. Using a strategic decision matrix with a two‐dimensional focus, 16 high‐visibility strategic decisions from different corporations in the 1990s are evaluated and classified to support the hypothesis that a formal decision‐making process is conducive to successful strategic decision outcomes. The results of this evaluation clearly indicate that, in the absence of a managerial decision‐making process, successful outcomes are unlikely to materialize. Conversely, although a process‐oriented approach to strategic choice affords no guarantee of a successful outcome, the likelihood of this occurrence tends to increase with this approach. This revisiting of strategic decision success confirms earlier research in this critical area. Hopefully, it will elicit subsequent research of a similar nature.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 39 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 12 August 2014

Sander Merkus, Jaap De Heer and Marcel Veenswijk

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the concept of performative struggle through the use of an interpretative case story focussed on a strategic decision-making

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the concept of performative struggle through the use of an interpretative case story focussed on a strategic decision-making process concerning infrastructural development. Performativity is about “world-making” (Carter et al., 2010), based on the assumption that conceptual schemes are not only prescriptions of the world, for the practices flowing from these abstract ideas bring into being the world they are describing. The focus on agency and multiplicity in the academic debate on performativity in organizational settings are combined, resulting in the conceptualization of a multitude of performative agents struggling to make the world.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodological approach of this paper is based on an interpretative analysis of contrasting narratives that are told by political-executives in a strategic decision-making process. These narratives are based on in-depth interviews and participant observation. The interpretative case story, exhibiting the strategic decision-making practices of Aldermen, Delegates and Ministers – focusses on the moments of performative struggle based on strategic narrative practices.

Findings

The interpretative case story will exhibit the way in which a multiplicity of agents reflects on the performative dimension of the decision-making process, anticipates on its performative effects and attempts to manipulate the strategic vision that is actualized into reality. Moreover, the agents are not primarily concerned with the actualization of a specific infrastructural project; they are more concerned with the consequences of decision making for their more comprehensive strategic visions on reality.

Research limitations/implications

The notion of performative struggle has not yet been explicitly studied by scholars focussing on performativity. However, the concept can be used as an appropriate lens for studying meaning making within ethnographic studies on organizational processes such as for instance culture change intervention and strategy formation. The concept of performative struggle is especially useful for understanding the political dimension of meaning making when studying an organizational life-world through the use of ethnographic research.

Originality/value

The originality of this paper lies in the innovative conceptualization of struggle between a multiplicity of reflexive agents in the debate on performative world-making. Moreover, the incorporation of the perspective of performative struggle within organizational ethnographic research is valuable for the development of organizational ethnographic methodology.

Details

Journal of Organizational Ethnography, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6749

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Article
Publication date: 7 April 2015

Lutz Kaufmann and Julia Gaeckler

First, this study expands knowledge on the strategic decision process dimension decision-making speed by analyzing decision-making speed and two possible antecedents in a…

Abstract

Purpose

First, this study expands knowledge on the strategic decision process dimension decision-making speed by analyzing decision-making speed and two possible antecedents in a purchasing context. Second, it takes an additional step toward clarifying the relationship between strategic and lateral integration. Specifically, the purpose of this paper is to analyze the potential mediating effect of lateral purchasing integration on the relationship between strategic purchasing integration and purchasing decision-making speed.

Design/methodology/approach

This research analyzes survey data of 152 firms from Austria, Germany, and Switzerland using covariance-based structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results of the structural equation model provide strong support for the hypothesized relationships. Strategic purchasing integration drives lateral purchasing integration, which in turn positively influences purchasing decision-making speed.

Research limitations/implications

This study focusses solely on internal types of integration. A logical next step would be to further enrich the model by including external dimensions, such as supplier or customer integration.

Practical implications

This study should help managers gain a better understanding of the relationship between strategic and lateral purchasing integration, highlighting their positive impact on decision-making speed. Decision-making speed is particularly important for companies operating in volatile markets and time-constrained business environments.

Originality/value

This study offers new insights into the theoretical and empirical connection between intra-organizational purchasing integration, unpacked as strategic purchasing integration and lateral purchasing integration, and purchasing decision-making speed. Furthermore, it offers insights into decision-making speed in a purchasing context.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 45 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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