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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2010

Zhu Zhang and Doyeon Won

This investigation evaluated four sports fan characteristics (fan identification, trust in internet shopping, attitude towards online purchasing, and perceptions of…

Abstract

This investigation evaluated four sports fan characteristics (fan identification, trust in internet shopping, attitude towards online purchasing, and perceptions of convenience) and two sports website characteristics (perception of product comparison service, and website price advantage) to assess their ability to differentiate licensed sports merchandise purchasers (buyers), and those who just browsed sports websites (browsers). The results made it possible to differentiate buyers and browsers based on 'trust in internet shopping', 'attitude towards online purchasing', 'perceptions of convenience', and 'website price advantage'. Additionally, all six characteristics collectively explained sports merchandise consumers buying versus browsing.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2011

Youngjin Hur, Yong Jae Ko and Cathryn L Claussen

The purpose of this study is to develop a Sport Website Acceptance Model (SWAM) based on the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM; Davis, 1989). To better explain sports fans'…

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to develop a Sport Website Acceptance Model (SWAM) based on the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM; Davis, 1989). To better explain sports fans' decision-making processes in using sports websites, we incorporated salient consumer variables as sports involvement and psychological commitment and added trustworthiness and enjoyment to the TAM. The paper concludes with implications for future research and for application to online sports business.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Paul Kitchin

Stick Cricket is a website visited by more than 2 million unique users every month, with each user averaging more than 20 minutes per visit. The website is positioned…

Abstract

Stick Cricket is a website visited by more than 2 million unique users every month, with each user averaging more than 20 minutes per visit. The website is positioned outside the sporting website category by internet research firms, and this oversight does not consider the valuable consumer segments that these types of websites may hold. This case study describes the business decisions of the Stick Cricket developers in taking a flash-based computer game and creating a website that has been transformed into a sporting portal. The factors that contribute to this success are discussed and provide useful tips for website developers and sports marketers.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2014

Taesoo Ahn, Young Ik Suh, Jin Kyun Lee and Paul M Pedersen

The purpose of this study was to examine purchasing intentions in online sports ticketing websites. Based on previous research related to business-to-consumer (B2C…

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine purchasing intentions in online sports ticketing websites. Based on previous research related to business-to-consumer (B2C) e-commerce, this study developed a conceptual model to test the effect of perceived risk, trust and the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) on purchase intentions in online secondary ticket websites. College students (N = 251) from the northeastern region of the United States were chosen as the sample. Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) was used to investigate the proposed relationships among four major components (i.e. perceived risk, trust, TAM and behavioural intention). The results showed that there were positive effects of key TAM constructs (i.e. perceived usefulness and ease of use) and trust on purchasing intention, but perceived risk was not a significant indicator of purchase intention.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2012

Youngjin Hur, Yong Jae Ko and Cathryn L. Claussen

This study empirically tested the Sport Website Acceptance Model (SWAM), proposed by Hur, Ko and Claussen (2007). The SWAM added Perceived Enjoyment (Davis et al, 1992…

Abstract

This study empirically tested the Sport Website Acceptance Model (SWAM), proposed by Hur, Ko and Claussen (2007). The SWAM added Perceived Enjoyment (Davis et al, 1992) and Perceived Trustworthiness (Belanger et al, 2002) to the two factors Perceived Ease of Use and Perceived Usefulness used in the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) (Davis, 1989). This study proposes a competing model to the original SWAM and compares this by incorporating two additional constructs, Sport Involvement (Shank & Beasley, 1998) and Psychological Commitment to a Team (Mahony et al, 2000). Structural equation modeling analyses revealed acceptable model fits, both in the original SWAM and in the competing model. Subsequent analyses led the authors to conclude that the competing model was the better version of the SWAM.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

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Abstract

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Woo-Young Lee, Youngjin Hur, Dae Yeon Kim and Christopher Brigham

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of congruity and endorsement on consumer attitudes toward sports website advertisements (Aad), the advertising brand…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of congruity and endorsement on consumer attitudes toward sports website advertisements (Aad), the advertising brand (Abr), and consumers’ future intentions (FI).

Design/methodology/approach

The current study followed a 2×3 between-subjects experimental design. Sports celebrity (or the presence or absence of a sports celebrity in a banner ad) and the level of congruity between the website and banner ad (high congruity – soccer, medium congruity – snowboard, and low congruity – computer) were the primary independent variables. Data were collected in two stages. An initial pilot study (n=40) established the reliability and validity of the scaled measures guiding this test. The second phase of data collection, the main study, was conducted over a five-day period. A random assignment of treatment conditions (i.e. exposure to one of six banner ad manipulations) was followed by a series of short surveys designed to measure the dependent variables of subjects’ cognitive ad responses (i.e. Aad, Abr, and FI).

Findings

The results indicated that participants who viewed the ad with the endorsement showed a more positive Aad than those who viewed the ad without it. The participants with a high congruity condition reported a more positive Abr and higher FI than those with low or medium congruity.

Originality/value

This study extends the application of congruity theory to banner advertisements, thereby aiding our understanding of consumers’ perceptions of advertising.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2004

Daniel M Evans and Aaron CT Smith

This research identifies internet-based opportunities for developing competitive marketing advantages and provides recommendations for the use of the internet in sports

Abstract

This research identifies internet-based opportunities for developing competitive marketing advantages and provides recommendations for the use of the internet in sports marketing. A telephone-administered survey, constructed from an instrument developed by Sethi and King (1994), Caskey (1998) and salient literature, was employed. All 55 clubs participating in Australia's four largest professional sporting leagues formed the sample, with an 87% participation rate achieved. Results lead to several practical recommendations for professional sporting organisations seeking to improve their internet marketing opportunities.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2011

Dae Hee Kwak and Stephen R McDaniel

This research examines antecedents to consumer adoption of a popular form of online entertainment - fantasy sports leagues. Employing Davis' (1989) Technology Acceptance…

Abstract

This research examines antecedents to consumer adoption of a popular form of online entertainment - fantasy sports leagues. Employing Davis' (1989) Technology Acceptance Model as a theoretical framework, the study found that attitude toward the televised sport (American professional football), perceived ease of using in relation to fantasy sports websites, perceived knowledge of the sport and subjective norms all played a role in explaining participants' attitudes and behavioural intentions towards playing fantasy football.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

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Article
Publication date: 21 April 2020

Geumchan Hwang, Lisa A. Kihl and Yuhei Inoue

This study examined how a US college athletic department’s corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives influenced fans’ online donation intentions.

Abstract

Purpose

This study examined how a US college athletic department’s corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives influenced fans’ online donation intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 490 fans of a Division I intercollegiate athletic program and analyzed using structural equation modeling.

Findings

Results indicated that the quality of CSR information positively affected e-satisfaction with CSR initiatives, which, in turn, predicted fans’ online donation intentions, university attachment, and fan–athletic department identification. Moreover, the relationship between e-satisfaction with CSR initiatives and online donation intentions was mediated by fan–athletic department identification.

Research limitations/implications

This study has a limitation in terms of generalizability. The current focus on a single athletic department does not apply the results to athletic programs at other US universities and colleges. Future research should confirm the generalizability of the study’s findings by collecting data from fans of other athletic departments.

Originality/value

It is important to understand the impact of CSR activities on online donor intentions because marketing these activities could serve as an effective fundraising tool for athletic departments. The findings from this study inform athletic administrators of factors they might consider when promoting CSR initiatives through online media to encourage fans’ donations.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

Keywords

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