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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2008

Dave Ferguson and Jayne Scott

Spirituality has started to attract increased interest in the mental health arena over recent years. Indeed, psychiatrists are becoming more interested in spirituality

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Abstract

Spirituality has started to attract increased interest in the mental health arena over recent years. Indeed, psychiatrists are becoming more interested in spirituality because of the benefits it can bring to the mental health of service users. However, the issue of spirituality and the mental health needs of people who have learning disabilities has not been extensively researched or reported. This article explores the spiritual dimension in mental health care and its relevance to people with learning disabilities. A discussion of the development of a working group to scope the issues in one learning disability service is explored, with practical commentary on the efforts made to gather more information from service providers. The findings from a brief survey are briefly discussed, as well as the developments which have ensued to date. The authors conclude that, although spirituality can mean different things to different people, responding to the diverse spiritual needs of service users must take a person‐centred and flexible approach.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-0180

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2004

A. Amin Mohamed, Joette Wisnieski, Askar and Syed

In spite of the importance of spirituality and the attention given to it by the media, research on the impact of spirituality in the workplace has been lacking. This paper…

Abstract

In spite of the importance of spirituality and the attention given to it by the media, research on the impact of spirituality in the workplace has been lacking. This paper attempts to stimulate academic interest in the topic by reviewing some of the management and psychology literature on spirituality. The paper takes a few steps towards resolving some of the definitional problems, and advances some preliminary propositions on the relationship between spirituality and job performance and behavior.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 14 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2003

Margaret Benefiel

Researchers in the burgeoning new field of spirituality in organizations face a number of significant field‐shaping questions, e.g. how should spirituality in…

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Abstract

Researchers in the burgeoning new field of spirituality in organizations face a number of significant field‐shaping questions, e.g. how should spirituality in organizations be defined and what research methods are most appropriate for this work – quantitative, qualitative, a combination of the two, or entirely new methods? The answers given to these questions will determine the shape of this new field and the direction research will take over the next several decades. This article addresses these questions by mapping the terrain of current spirituality in organizations research, in three stages. It begins by examining trails being blazed by pioneers venturing into this new territory, considering the progress these pioneers have made and the work remaining to be done. It then moves to questions lurking in the background of this pioneering work. Finally, it articulates the new frontier in spirituality in organizations research, a frontier which beckons adventurous pioneers to enter.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 15 June 2022

Pushkar Dubey, Abhishek Kumar Pathak and Kailash Kumar Sahu

Without competent and talented employees, no organisation can grow and sustain for a long time. It becomes essential for every organisation to retain and satisfy the…

Abstract

Purpose

Without competent and talented employees, no organisation can grow and sustain for a long time. It becomes essential for every organisation to retain and satisfy the employees to achieve their predetermined organisational goals. The present study examines the mediating effect of workplace spirituality dimensions (i.e. meaningful work, compassion, transcendence, mindfulness and sense of community) in the link between job satisfaction and organisational citizenship behaviour (OCB) among managerial employees of selected manufacturing firms of Chhattisgarh state.

Design/methodology/approach

Correlational research design was incorporated. Employees working at managerial positions at different private manufacturing firms of Chhattisgarh state were chosen as a sample for the present study. Regression analysis and confirmatory factor analysis tools were used to analyse the primary data collected from 400 respondents.

Findings

The results revealed that all the dimensions of workplace spirituality, i.e. meaningful work, compassion, transcendence, mindfulness and sense of community, were found statistically significant and partially mediated between job satisfaction and OCB among managerial employees of Chhattisgarh. The authors discussed the results thoroughly and provided avenues for the future research.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of the present research study will assist all private organisations in rethinking their employee retention and satisfaction strategies, since the presence of workplace spirituality in the organisation has a significant and beneficial impact on its environment. The current research will assist organisations in creating circumstances for OCB for employee via the introduction of workplace spirituality.

Originality/value

Creating spirituality in the current situation, where Covid-19 has suddenly affected all organisations around the world, would be extremely beneficial in terms of employee retention and satisfaction, which would eventually aid in the development of an environment conducive to citizenship behaviour at the workplace. However, the role of workplace spirituality as a mediator in the link between job satisfaction and OCB is innovative and has received little attention in the research community.

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 28 June 2022

Johanna Anzengruber

This paper aims to explain the effects of spirituality at work on organizational commitment during the COVID-19 pandemic. In detail, it investigates whether the active…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explain the effects of spirituality at work on organizational commitment during the COVID-19 pandemic. In detail, it investigates whether the active part of spirituality at work, called spiritual expression, has a positive influence on organizational commitment in a hierarchically organized private hospital. In addition, it explores whether the sense of belonging at work mediates spiritual expressions and a person’s commitment toward the employer during times of severe crisis.

Design/methodology/approach

This study tests the hypotheses on a range of health-care personnel, including doctors, nurses, physicians, administrators, managers and cleaning staff. This study draws on quantitative data of more than one third of the employees of that private Austrian hospital (n = 96) and on insights from 12 qualitative interviews conducted over a period of four months during spring 2021.

Findings

This study finds strong evidence that spiritual expression at work is directly related to belonging and indirectly related to organizational commitment through belonging. This study extracts eight concurrent themes impacting the effectiveness of spirituality at work in the hospital.

Originality/value

This study provides insights on how to facilitate spiritual expression at work to increase flexibility and resilience in the health-care sector. All in all, spirituality at work is better understood as a “multi-authored” process, in which all participants, including the patients, co-create its meaning and implications.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 30 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 16 May 2017

Lubna Asrar Siddiqi, Helen Chick and Mark Dibben

With increasing ethical issues and global corporate scandals, many organisations are now looking to employ well-rounded professionals, who take ownership of their…

Abstract

With increasing ethical issues and global corporate scandals, many organisations are now looking to employ well-rounded professionals, who take ownership of their workplace while leading with their heart and soul. These organisations seem to be more concerned with relationship building and future employability (Cunha, Rego, & D’Oliveira, 2006) and are interested in the concept of spirituality with the hope that it could address ethical issues influencing their businesses.

Spirituality and ethics are core values that have shaped human life from time immemorial’ (Mahadevan, 2013, p. 91). Ethics and spirituality are interrelated but different as ethics is about customs and habits, while spirituality is concerned with personal meaningful experiences and differs from person to person, making it hard to define.

Organisations moving towards spirituality require leadership that can develop a spiritual climate and their learning and development has to be top priority (Pawar, 2009).

This requires management education to appreciate the concept of spirituality and like some universities globally, incorporate it within their programmes (Harris & Crossman, 2005).

To explore whether spirituality could be incorporated within the higher education curriculum, my PhD researched academic’s viewpoints in selected faculties within a regional university in Australia. This paper reports some of its findings from the data gathered through semi-structured interviews, with a focus on leadership, its relevance to ethics and the teaching of spirituality. Results indicate that academics support the inclusion of spirituality but the programmes need to be carefully designed.

Details

Responsible Leadership and Ethical Decision-Making
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-416-3

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 10 June 2014

Social identity as shaped by religion or spirituality is unique in comparison to some other social identity dimensions because it may be invisible unless a person wears a…

Abstract

Social identity as shaped by religion or spirituality is unique in comparison to some other social identity dimensions because it may be invisible unless a person wears a symbol or dress widely regarded as synonymous with a given religious tradition. Yet, some employees choose to fuse their personal and work lives when religion or spirituality is a salient dimension of their social identity. Problems emerge, however, and can make for an awkward fit in the business world.

Perhaps the primary advantage to religion or spirituality at work is potential for high employee morale and residual benefits in enhanced performance. Scholars who research the God gap suggest that abundant and ongoing airing of political and religious difference can benefit everyone. Numerous business organizations endorse respectful pluralism and lived religion, enabling employees to participate in community service activities, retreats with nature walks, physical exercise, meditation, spiritual contemplation, physical space for individual prayer and group discussions throughout the day, faith-related reading materials, and faith leaders to provide counseling. Yet, even though religion is a federally protected class and employers in some parts of the world are mandated to accommodate employees’ religious beliefs and observances so long as no undue hardship on business operations results, this does not mean that conflicts do not arise. To explore religious identity and spirituality with a focus on workplace dynamics, Chapter 11 is divided into subthemes of: what is religious identity?, accommodating faith/spirituality at work, faith/spirituality in organizations and health, the formal religion-spirituality dichotomy, lived religion, and conflicts about faith/spirituality in the workplace.

Details

Practical and Theoretical Implications of Successfully Doing Difference in Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-678-1

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 17 September 2014

Christopher J. L. Cunningham

This chapter explores religion and spirituality as a form and source of demographic differences relevant to the study of occupational stress and well-being. The purpose of…

Abstract

This chapter explores religion and spirituality as a form and source of demographic differences relevant to the study of occupational stress and well-being. The purpose of the chapter is to provide a resource and starting point to occupational health and stress researchers who may be interested in religion/spirituality. A review of critical religion/spirituality concepts is provided, along with a discussion of how religion/spirituality can be integrated into common occupational stress theories and reconciled with commonly studied variables within this domain. A series of future research directions involving religion/spirituality and occupational health and stress are ultimately presented.

Details

The Role of Demographics in Occupational Stress and Well Being
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-646-0

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 12 December 2003

Arvind Sharma

One might begin by clarifying the title, which could as well have read: A Hindu Perspective on Religion and Management. It could of course be argued that there are good…

Abstract

One might begin by clarifying the title, which could as well have read: A Hindu Perspective on Religion and Management. It could of course be argued that there are good prudential reasons for preferring the word “spirituality” to “religion.” In a recent probe of the attitudes of several hundred managers, only 30% had a positive view of religion and spirituality. More than half, 60%, had a positive view of spirituality and a negative view of religion.1 In the case of Hinduism, however, although prudential concerns apply, other reasons also come into play. It could be plausibly argued that Hinduism is better described as a “spirituality” or “wisdom”2 rather than religion in the Western sense, a tendency which is already apparent in attempts to describe it as a “state of mind,”3 and even the “mind of India.”4 The title, therefore, appropriate as it is, is particularly apposite in the case of Hinduism.5 Thus, rather than why spirituality, the first question one must address is: What is Spirituality?

Details

Spiritual Intelligence at Work: Meaning, Metaphor, and Morals
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-067-8

Book part
Publication date: 12 December 2003

Gerald Cavanagh, Bradley Hanson, Kirk Hanson and Juan Hinojoso

Jerry feels good as he leaves his office for the day. He takes pride in being CEO of a Healthcare System that provides much-needed services to the urban poor often in…

Abstract

Jerry feels good as he leaves his office for the day. He takes pride in being CEO of a Healthcare System that provides much-needed services to the urban poor often in difficult circumstances. He reflects that his career has been an interesting journey. He had started as an accountant with Price Waterhouse, but found the work and time pressures very heavy. Wanting to spend more time with his family, he moved to the a health care system and rose to Controller. There had been a period while Controller when he wondered whether he had made an error in making the change, given the financial turbulence his health care system experienced with the transition to managed care. He experienced no less stress than at Price Waterhouse as he assisted his new employer to manage a turnaround to eliminate waste and reposition the system within a solid financial model. But he emerged from the turnaround with a new sense of direction and drive. Subsequently, seven years ago Healthhelp chose him as its Chief Financial Officer and he’s been CEO for almost three years. Today he’s excited about the new marketing plan he just reviewed which promises to give Healthhelp a bigger share of the home care market.

Details

Spiritual Intelligence at Work: Meaning, Metaphor, and Morals
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-067-8

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