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Article

Dave Ferguson and Jayne Scott

Spirituality has started to attract increased interest in the mental health arena over recent years. Indeed, psychiatrists are becoming more interested in spirituality

Abstract

Spirituality has started to attract increased interest in the mental health arena over recent years. Indeed, psychiatrists are becoming more interested in spirituality because of the benefits it can bring to the mental health of service users. However, the issue of spirituality and the mental health needs of people who have learning disabilities has not been extensively researched or reported. This article explores the spiritual dimension in mental health care and its relevance to people with learning disabilities. A discussion of the development of a working group to scope the issues in one learning disability service is explored, with practical commentary on the efforts made to gather more information from service providers. The findings from a brief survey are briefly discussed, as well as the developments which have ensued to date. The authors conclude that, although spirituality can mean different things to different people, responding to the diverse spiritual needs of service users must take a person‐centred and flexible approach.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-0180

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Article

A. Amin Mohamed, Joette Wisnieski, Askar and Syed

In spite of the importance of spirituality and the attention given to it by the media, research on the impact of spirituality in the workplace has been lacking. This paper…

Abstract

In spite of the importance of spirituality and the attention given to it by the media, research on the impact of spirituality in the workplace has been lacking. This paper attempts to stimulate academic interest in the topic by reviewing some of the management and psychology literature on spirituality. The paper takes a few steps towards resolving some of the definitional problems, and advances some preliminary propositions on the relationship between spirituality and job performance and behavior.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 14 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

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Article

Margaret Benefiel

Researchers in the burgeoning new field of spirituality in organizations face a number of significant field‐shaping questions, e.g. how should spirituality in…

Abstract

Researchers in the burgeoning new field of spirituality in organizations face a number of significant field‐shaping questions, e.g. how should spirituality in organizations be defined and what research methods are most appropriate for this work – quantitative, qualitative, a combination of the two, or entirely new methods? The answers given to these questions will determine the shape of this new field and the direction research will take over the next several decades. This article addresses these questions by mapping the terrain of current spirituality in organizations research, in three stages. It begins by examining trails being blazed by pioneers venturing into this new territory, considering the progress these pioneers have made and the work remaining to be done. It then moves to questions lurking in the background of this pioneering work. Finally, it articulates the new frontier in spirituality in organizations research, a frontier which beckons adventurous pioneers to enter.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article

Nandan Prabhu, Badrinarayan Srirangam Ramaprasad, Krishna Prasad and Roopa Modem

This study explores the mediating influences of team reflexivity and workplace spirituality in the shared transformational leadership-team performance relationship.

Abstract

Purpose

This study explores the mediating influences of team reflexivity and workplace spirituality in the shared transformational leadership-team performance relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Adopting the cross-sectional research design, this study collected data from 130 ongoing teams working in India's information technology (IT) sector. The study collected data on shared transformational leadership by adopting the referent-shift consensus method while collecting data on team performance from managers. Thus, the study explored the relationships among the constructs of this research by using multi-source data.

Findings

This study has shown that shared transformational leadership induces workplace spirituality and team reflexivity among team members. This research's results show that workplace spirituality mediates the shared transformational leadership-team performance and shared transformational leadership-team reflexivity relationships. This research has also demonstrated that team reflexivity mediates the shared transformational leadership-team performance relationship.

Practical implications

Necessity to facilitate relational job design changes, knowledge sharing, intellectual stimulation is the primary managerial implication of this study. This study also articulates the need to pay attention to create organizational conditions for the emergence of workplace spirituality.

Originality/value

This is the first study that has positioned shared transformational leadership and workplace spirituality as the antecedents of team reflexivity. This research has shown the value and limitation of team reflexivity in ongoing teams.

Details

South Asian Journal of Business Studies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-628X

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Article

P.M. Nimmi, Alka K. Binoy, George Joseph and R. Suma

The unending ambivalence in the academic environment and the job market is detrimental to management graduates' wellbeing. The study looks into the possible intervening…

Abstract

Purpose

The unending ambivalence in the academic environment and the job market is detrimental to management graduates' wellbeing. The study looks into the possible intervening methods to enhance the wellbeing of students during difficult times. The study proposes spirituality development as means through which psychological resources like perceived employability and psychological capital are developed in an individual. This study also tries to identify how spirituality development leads to life wellbeing among management students.

Design/methodology/approach

Cross-sectional study was conducted among 212 management students from Kerala, India. Multi-stage random sampling was used to collect data. Structural equation modelling using IBM-AMOS was done to gain insights into the proposed relationships.

Findings

The results indicated that spirituality had a significant impact on the wellbeing of management students. Both perceived employability and psychological capital mediated the relationship between spirituality and life wellbeing.

Research limitations/implications

The positive impact of developing spirituality among students is discussed in the paper with the theoretical underpinning of broaden and build theory. The findings suggest that colleges should try to make their campus climate more supportive of students' non-academic needs and open them to a spiritual environment especially during these challenging times.

Originality/value

The study is one of the first attempts to discern how spirituality development leads to an accumulation of psychological resources and life wellbeing among management graduates'.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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Article

Lalatendu Kesari Jena

For businesses today, employee performance is most important. Therefore, this paper aims to the greater purpose of ‘ideal workplace’; focusing on determining the effect of…

Abstract

Purpose

For businesses today, employee performance is most important. Therefore, this paper aims to the greater purpose of ‘ideal workplace’; focusing on determining the effect of workplace spirituality on employee performance because organizations tend to neglect employees’ spiritual and/or mental wellness but well-maintain the output. This paper also shines light on the mediating role of organizational citizenship behavior and the moderating nature of employee’s emotional intelligence.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was conducted with a cross-sectional descriptive and analytical approach. Data were collected in two rounds. In total, 761 responses (416 offline and 345 online) were analyzed for all four hypotheses using statistical data package for social sciences and analysis of moments structure; imploring correlation, regression and mediation and moderation analysis.

Findings

The study found that workplace spirituality is indeed positively linked with employees’ performance. Organizational citizenship behavior is positively associated with workplace spirituality and employee performance. Mediation analysis indicated that organizational citizenship behavior significantly enhances the relationship of workplace spirituality and employee performance. Moderation analysis suggested that employee’s emotional intelligence significantly boosts employee performance.

Originality/value

This research offers deep and critical insights for curating future research and managerial practices, strengthening the concept of workplace spirituality as a promising area in the fields of human resource management and organizational psychology. The study uses a unique approach and provides exclusive findings regarding Indian service and manufacturing professionals.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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Article

Sujoko Efferin and Christopher Christian Hutomo

This study attempts to explore the meaning and implication of spirituality in an accounting firm by using a Buddhist perspective of interbeing. It explains how the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study attempts to explore the meaning and implication of spirituality in an accounting firm by using a Buddhist perspective of interbeing. It explains how the happiness of individuals (auditors, partners, clients and auditor family members); organisational performance and growth and auditors' commitment are interconnected and impermanent.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employed an interpretive case study in an Indonesian accounting firm. The researchers explored the collective and individual feelings, thoughts, actions and experiences of the firm's actors. The data collection methods were interviews, participant observations and documentary analysis.

Findings

Leadership plays a major role in cultivating spirituality in an accounting firm. The spirituality increases auditors' commitment, (conditional) happiness and performance resulting in client satisfaction and the firm's growth. From an interbeing perspective, partners, auditors and clients are interconnected and impermanent. A firm's growth creates a growing sense of unhappiness due to the diminishing of auditors' comfort zone. Spirituality in the workplace can only engender conditional happiness and organisational commitment that offset the importance of material rewards and career prospects. To reach ultimate (unconditional) happiness, one requires a continuous spiritual development.

Research limitations/implications

The insights gained from this study need enrichment from cases in different contexts, e.g. multinational firms with members from different countries and cultures.

Originality/value

This study develops the discourse of emancipation in the accounting literature by taking into account spirituality and happiness.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

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Article

Joan Marques

This paper aims to contribute or rekindle internal and external dialogues about the interactions, decisions and behaviour in the work environments; while also consider…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to contribute or rekindle internal and external dialogues about the interactions, decisions and behaviour in the work environments; while also consider some critical overarching values that can help workforce members cope with the stress and pressure, which augment as the speed of life increases.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology used in this project is an integrative literature review, supported by, findings and reflections from two doctoral dissertations: one in workplace spirituality and one in Buddhist psychology; and the researcher’s analysis and joint application of these two streams over the past decade.

Findings

Workplace spirituality and Buddhist psychology share overlapping, multi-interpretable traits, with as the main discrepancies that workplace spirituality is a relatively new concept, while Buddhist psychology has been around for more than 2,500 years; and workplace spirituality focusses only on the workplace, while Buddhist psychology focusses on every area of the life. Yet, the overarching notion of doing right while respecting and accepting others and aiming for an overarching better quality of life remains a strong driver in both realms.

Research limitations/implications

This paper will hopefully entice future researchers to engage in additional studies on spiritual intersections to expand on such databases and enhance awareness, acceptance and implementation amongst scholars and practitioners in business settings.

Practical implications

Exploring intersections of behavioural disciplines such as workplace spirituality and Buddhist psychology addresses an important need within workforce members and therewith also those within their social circles, as they evoke deeper and consistent contemplation on the aspects that connect us together and can enhance overall well-being and happiness at a greater magnitude than, this study experiences it today.

Social implications

The study aims to deliver a contribution to the database of awareness-enhancing literature, in an effort to help spawn dialogue and critical thinking about the attitudes and behaviours towards ourselves, others and the future.

Originality/value

This paper presents an overview of themes in two psychological streams, both focussing on living and acting with greater consciousness, to make more mindful decisions, improve the overall experience of cooperating towards a common good and understand the responsibility towards creating a future that will be sustainable rather than destroyed.

Details

Journal of Global Responsibility, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2041-2568

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Book part

Lubna Asrar Siddiqi, Helen Chick and Mark Dibben

With increasing ethical issues and global corporate scandals, many organisations are now looking to employ well-rounded professionals, who take ownership of their…

Abstract

With increasing ethical issues and global corporate scandals, many organisations are now looking to employ well-rounded professionals, who take ownership of their workplace while leading with their heart and soul. These organisations seem to be more concerned with relationship building and future employability (Cunha, Rego, & D’Oliveira, 2006) and are interested in the concept of spirituality with the hope that it could address ethical issues influencing their businesses.

Spirituality and ethics are core values that have shaped human life from time immemorial’ (Mahadevan, 2013, p. 91). Ethics and spirituality are interrelated but different as ethics is about customs and habits, while spirituality is concerned with personal meaningful experiences and differs from person to person, making it hard to define.

Organisations moving towards spirituality require leadership that can develop a spiritual climate and their learning and development has to be top priority (Pawar, 2009).

This requires management education to appreciate the concept of spirituality and like some universities globally, incorporate it within their programmes (Harris & Crossman, 2005).

To explore whether spirituality could be incorporated within the higher education curriculum, my PhD researched academic’s viewpoints in selected faculties within a regional university in Australia. This paper reports some of its findings from the data gathered through semi-structured interviews, with a focus on leadership, its relevance to ethics and the teaching of spirituality. Results indicate that academics support the inclusion of spirituality but the programmes need to be carefully designed.

Details

Responsible Leadership and Ethical Decision-Making
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-416-3

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Article

Kelly A. Phipps and Charlotte Shelton

The purpose of this study was to examine the experience of strategic-level leaders whose spiritual beliefs or practices inform their organizational decision making.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to examine the experience of strategic-level leaders whose spiritual beliefs or practices inform their organizational decision making.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a phenomenological methodology, 25 executives were interviewed to understand their lived experience. All participants held executive level positions, engaged in spiritual practices at least once a week and described spirituality as important in their lives.

Findings

Thematic analysis revealed themes that pointed to the locus of spirituality in the lives of the executives (innate but not overt) and the types of decisions for which they turned to their spirituality (decisions concerning people). When facing these types of decisions, leaders described an additional step we named “executive discernment.” This additional step sought to establish a connection with the transcendent and was described as heightening their decision-making abilities, serving as a model or “North Star,” or guiding them to a decision.

Originality/value

This study builds on prior theoretical work and gives insight into a process not usually visible: executives' reliance on spirituality during organizational decision making. These insights highlight the potential benefits and provide specificity to the potential risks for leaders who turn to spirituality when making organizational decisions. These risks include an overconfidence in one's decision-making abilities, reliance on an authority inconsistent with organizational aims or failing to convince others of the wisdom of the chosen direction.

Details

Management Decision, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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