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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 14 December 2022

Adekola Afolabi Ashonibare

This paper aims to investigate existing practices of transversal skills training in doctoral education and provide recommendations for improvement for universities…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate existing practices of transversal skills training in doctoral education and provide recommendations for improvement for universities, industry and doctoral students in Europe. The results offer a detailed picture that has implications for the design of doctoral education programs that aim to support transferable skills development and graduate employability.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative research method was used for this study; thus, data gained from existing literature were the most significant aspect of this study, serving as the key approach to answering the research questions. A literature review approach, which involved synthesizing and analyzing existing literature, was adopted in this study. Essential themes were identified and collected from literature through an inductive coding technique to find answers to questions in this study.

Findings

The research highlights the importance of coordinated efforts to improve transversal skills training in doctoral education programs. Universities must adapt their curriculum to meet industry skill requirements and provide enabling support for faculty innovative teaching. Private enterprises must continue to provide training for doctoral graduates employed in the industry because not all skills can be taught and developed in the university. Doctoral students themselves must be intentional about creating industry networks for acquiring transferable skills needed in nonacademic jobs.

Social implications

In response to industry demands, a university should not be seen as a place where doctoral students formulate a theory about the net ideology of a discipline but as a place for socializing, interacting, arguing critically and developing transferable skills for various careers. The advocacy for transversal skill training in doctoral education positively impacts society, producing doctoral researchers with an innovative mindset. Universities must continue improving existing skill-based training and work-integrated learning practices while seeking new collaboration with various industry sectors.

Originality/value

This study provides relevant ideas for faculty, industry and doctoral students on enhancing the employability of doctoral graduates through the development of transversal skills.

Details

Studies in Graduate and Postdoctoral Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4686

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 10 June 2009

Wilda F. Meixner, Dennis Bline, Dana R. Lowe and Hossein Nouri

Communication researchers have observed that students will avoid majors that require the use of certain skills where the individual exhibits a high level of apprehension…

Abstract

Communication researchers have observed that students will avoid majors that require the use of certain skills where the individual exhibits a high level of apprehension toward those skills. Historically, accounting has been perceived as requiring more math skills and fewer communication skills than other business majors so accounting has typically attracted students with low math apprehension and high communication (written and oral) apprehension. The current study investigates whether business students' perceptions across business majors regarding the level of mathematics, writing, and oral communication skills required for accounting reflect the recent changes in pedagogy and curriculum content for the accounting major.

The results indicate that the perception of skills required to be an accounting major by students in other business majors (more math and less communication) is different from the perception of accounting majors. On the other hand, accounting majors' perceptions of the skills needed to be in an alternative business major is generally similar to students in the respective major. These observations may lead to the interpretation that accounting majors have gotten the word that professional expectations of accountants involve substantial communication skill while that message has apparently not been shared with students who elect to major in other business fields.

Details

Advances in Accounting Behavioral Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-739-0

Article
Publication date: 11 January 2023

Tsang-Kai Hung, Mu Tian and Shih-Liang Lee

The purpose of this research is to explore how knowledge source and knowledge recipient influence knowledge transfer performance through political skill and partnership…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to explore how knowledge source and knowledge recipient influence knowledge transfer performance through political skill and partnership quality, and in so doing to make up for the lack of research on the political skills of knowledge sources in the process of knowledge transfer.

Design/methodology/approach

This research used paired-sample questionnaires to conduct a survey. One direct supervisor was paired with 1–4 subordinates; 224 other-reported questionnaires were sent out to supervisors and 896 self-reported questionnaires to subordinates. A total of 171 valid supervisor questionnaires and 511 valid subordinate questionnaires were collected. Hierarchical regression analysis was used to analyze the data.

Findings

This empirical research demonstrated that knowledge sources with political skills can promote partnership quality and influence the success of knowledge transfer.

Research limitations/implications

This study was a cross-sectional design. Therefore, in our future research, self-report and non-self-report data will be collected in the process of questionnaire administration, and a multi-group questionnaire method (time/field isolation method) will be adopted to avoid having the same source of data. Supervisors and employees will be divided into different groups to collect sources, and the results from two different sources will be used to reduce the negative impact of common method variance.

Practical implications

External knowledge sources with political skills can impact recipient' knowledge transfer performance in the workplace, which means that external knowledge sources can provide the organization with innovative ideas and implementation skills.

Originality/value

The study presents a valid model that comprises the antecedents (characteristics of the source of knowledge), mediators (partnership quality), moderators (political skill) and consequences of knowledge transfer performance of firms.

Details

Management Decision, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 January 2023

Quan Hoang Nguyen Tran

This research aims to explore the influence of leadership skills (technical, human and conceptual) on organisational citizenship behaviour (OCB) with the mediating role of…

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to explore the influence of leadership skills (technical, human and conceptual) on organisational citizenship behaviour (OCB) with the mediating role of organisational culture in Vietnamese libraries.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative methodology was selected to achieve the objective of this research. Data were gathered through paper/pencil surveys from 201 participants working in various Vietnamese libraries. The convergent validity, consistency reliability and discriminant validity of measures were validated challenged via Stata 15.1 software. The findings of the proposed hypotheses were examined via regression analysis.

Findings

The results partially supported the hypothesis that leadership skills significantly predict OCB. Regarding the relationship between leadership skills and organisational culture, only human skill significantly affected bureaucracy culture. In turn, only bureaucracy culture significantly affected the OCB of individuals (OCBI) and OCB of organisations (OCBO). Finally, bureaucracy culture significantly mediated the relationship between human skill, OCBI and OCBO.

Originality/value

This study opens the scope of research on leadership skills in Vietnamese libraries by exploring three main gaps in the extant studies of leadership approach, namely, the influence of three leadership skills on OCB, the role of leadership in promoting organisational culture and the underlying mechanism through which leadership skills contribute to OCB with the mediation of organisational culture. The implications of the research are discussed.

Details

Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9342

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 January 2023

Khristin Fabian, Ella Taylor-Smith, Sally Smith and Andrew Bratton

The purpose of this study is to gain insight into the degree apprenticeship labour market and employers' strategies for apprenticeship recruitment using job advertisement…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to gain insight into the degree apprenticeship labour market and employers' strategies for apprenticeship recruitment using job advertisement data. Specifically, this study identifies the skills, attributes, experience and qualifications that employers look for in IT apprentices. The study also identifies the salaries and responsibilities of apprentices and considers the alignment between the advertised jobs and apprenticeship definitions.

Design/methodology/approach

Degree apprenticeship job adverts (n = 290) were collected from the official websites used by employers in England and Scotland to advertise apprenticeship roles, between March 2019 and March 2020. Data was analysed using content analysis to systematically elicit salaries, candidate requirements in terms of skills, qualifications and experience and specific job details from these adverts.

Findings

A wide variation in advertised salary was found. Entry routes were similar to the traditional high school qualifications (A-levels or Highers) sought by universities. The skills and attributes being sought at recruitment were the same skills that employers were seeking in graduates and the same skills that the apprenticeships were designed to develop. Most adverts focused on the training that the apprentices would be receiving, rather than work tasks, which were rarely specified.

Originality/value

This is the first study of how apprenticeship roles are advertised to potential candidates and thus contributes to ongoing research into this new work/degree-level education model. By analysing job adverts we share insights into how employers position apprenticeships to attract candidates.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 January 2023

Chathuri Gunarathna, Rebecca Yang, Pabasara Wijeratne Mudiyanselage, Gayashan Amarasinghe, Tharushi Samarasinghalage, R.P. Nilmini Weerasinghe, Hongying Zhao, Chaoxiang Zhang, Chengyang Liu, Kaige Wang and Sujan Dev Sureshkumar Jayakumari

Project-based learning is one of the most effective methods of transferring academic knowledge and skills to real-world situations in higher education. However, its…

Abstract

Purpose

Project-based learning is one of the most effective methods of transferring academic knowledge and skills to real-world situations in higher education. However, its effectiveness is not much investigated focusing on the students' narrative. This study aims at evaluating the students' experience and perspective on adopting project-based learning in master by research and doctoral programmes for proactive skills development.

Design/methodology/approach

This study evaluates the self-reflection of 10 postgraduate students and their supervisor who have participated in developing a software tool for solar photovoltaics (PV) integrated building envelope design, management and the related education.

Findings

Findings reveal that the students have effectively improved their knowledge on the subject via collaborating with the industry, self-learning/observation, peer learning, problem-solving and teamwork. Dividing the project into student-led tasks has improved the decision-making and leadership skills, risks identification, planning and time management skills. The overall experience has (1) built up confidence in students, (2) enhanced their creativity and critical thinking and (3) improved their proactive skills and context knowledge.

Originality/value

A clear research gap can be seen in exploring the effectiveness of project-based learning for master by research and doctoral programmes, which mainly focus on extensive research. These programmes do not necessarily focus on developing students' proactive skills, which is the main requirement if they intend to work in the construction industry. This paper addresses the above research gap by demonstrating the effectiveness of project-based learning for developing the proactive skills in a research-intensive learning environment.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 February 2023

Fabienne Kiener, Ann-Sophie Gnehm and Uschi Backes-Gellner

The purpose of this paper is to investigate self-competence—the ability to act responsibly on one's own—and likely nonlinear wage returns across different levels of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate self-competence—the ability to act responsibly on one's own—and likely nonlinear wage returns across different levels of self-competence as part of training curricula.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors identify the teaching of self-competence at the occupational level by applying machine-learning methods to the texts of occupational training curricula. Defining three levels of self-competence (high, medium, and low) and using individual labor market data, the authors examine nonlinearities in wage returns to different levels of self-competence.

Findings

The authors find nonlinear returns to teaching self-competence: a medium level of self-competence taught in an occupation has the largest wage returns compared to low or high levels. However, in occupations with a high cognitive requirement profile, a high level of self-competence generates positive wage returns.

Originality/value

This paper first adds to research on the importance of teaching noncognitive skills for economic outcomes, which recently—in addition to personality traits research—has primarily focused on social skills by introducing self-competence as another largely unexplored but important noncognitive skill. Second, the paper studies not only average but also nonlinear wage returns, showing that the right level of self-competence is crucial, i.e. neither teaching too little nor too much self-competence provides favorable returns because of trade-offs with other skills (e.g. technical or professional skills). Third, the paper also examines complementarities between cognitive skills and noncognitive skills, again pointing toward nonlinear returns, i.e. only in occupations with a high cognitive requirement profile, high levels of self-competence generate positive wage returns.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 January 2023

Osagie Oseghale

The purpose of this paper is to assess the level of digital information literacy (DIL) skill and use of electronic resources by humanities graduate students at Kenneth…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the level of digital information literacy (DIL) skill and use of electronic resources by humanities graduate students at Kenneth Dike Library, University of Ibadan, Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses the survey research design and 200 graduate students from the 12 departments that made up the Faculty of Arts in the University of Ibadan participated in the study. A self-devised structured questionnaire was used as instrument for data collection. A pilot questionnaire was first sent to a small random sample of the respondents, with feedback used to fine-tune the final questionnaire. Respondents were requested to rate their level of proficiency in the use of digital devices, web-based tasks, information finding, evaluation and utilisation of available e-resources and challenges encountered. Ethical consideration of informed consent, institutional permission, confidentiality and anonymity of participants was strictly followed. Data collected were analysed and result presented using descriptive statistics including frequencies, percentage, mean and inferential statistics such as regression analysis and Pearson’s product moment correlation coefficient were used to test the research question and hypothesis, respectively.

Findings

Humanities graduate students at the University of Ibadan possessed high level of DIL skills in respect of digital devices usage, web-based tasks, information finding and evaluation, but low in e-resources utilisation. This study identified inadequate knowledge of e-resources availability, irregular internet access, inadequate training on e-resources utilisation, inadequate staff assistance, lack of continuity in e-resources subscription and paucity of local contents in the e-resources as main challenges encountered by graduate students in the use of e-resources. To ensure that those who can most benefit from e-resources utilisation are not further marginalised, this study recommends that active steps should be taken to increase e-resources awareness, regular internet access, training/support, continuity of e-resources subscription and increased local content so that all may benefit from the opportunities of the information age.

Originality/value

This paper has demonstrated that DIL skills can enhance effective utilisation of e-resources if users have adequate knowledge of e-resources availability, regular internet access, adequate training and assistance on e-resources utilisation, continuity in database subscription and adequate local contents e-resources.

Details

Digital Library Perspectives, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5816

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 20 December 2022

Cristian Barra and Nazzareno Ruggiero

Using data for a set of 32 Sub-Saharan countries over the years 2000, 2005 and 2010, the paper investigates the effects of domestic governmental stability upon emigration…

Abstract

Purpose

Using data for a set of 32 Sub-Saharan countries over the years 2000, 2005 and 2010, the paper investigates the effects of domestic governmental stability upon emigration and assesses whether education and gender shape the relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper adopts instrumental variable (IV) Poisson regressions and two-stage least squares (2SLS) as robustness tests.

Findings

The paper suggests that increased governmental stability has a larger impact on the emigration of high-skilled individuals. Nevertheless, once emigrants are partitioned according to both education and gender, the authors find evidence of a larger impact of stability on the emigration of highly educated females.

Research limitations/implications

The empirical findings may lack generalizability because of the chosen research approach. Then, researchers are encouraged to test the proposed propositions further.

Practical implications

The paper includes implications that can be drawn for both the growth and the development of Sub-Saharan Africa.

Originality/value

This paper fulfills an identified need to study how both education and gender shape the relationship between domestic governmental stability and emigration.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 December 2022

Mageda A. Sharafeddin and Ahmad Samarji

In a technological era driven by coding, programming and artificial intelligence (AI), there is more need than ever to develop computing skills and knowledge for…

Abstract

Purpose

In a technological era driven by coding, programming and artificial intelligence (AI), there is more need than ever to develop computing skills and knowledge for non-specialist students. Nonetheless, the literature on computer science teaching methods of non-scientific majors is not as comprehensive as that of scientific ones.

Design/methodology/approach

Pedagogically, the authors designed and implemented prototyping from John Dewey's pragmatic epistemological lens. Using a mixed methods approach, the authors tested the effectiveness and efficiency of this approach within the same course over four semesters across four academic years.

Findings

As an epistemological pedagogic device, prototyping facilitated learning by doing and experimenting and stimulated graduate students' self-directed learning, engagement and their overall ownership of the learning and teaching process, changing their role from being merely passive recipients of “strange, awkward and unfamiliar” knowledge to active constructors of “relevant and exciting” content knowledge. Such a change was reflected in the significant progress students made, driven by their commitment, motivation and enthusiasm, irrespective of their prior knowledge and age (Generations X, Y and Z). Prototyping also served as an avenue for a “Deweyian Reflection”, where graduate students, after internalizing the acquired computing skills and knowledge, started transferring such skills and knowledge to their professions (journalism and public relations (PR)) and daily practices.

Research limitations/implications

Findings from this study will add to the literature review on this subject matter and will inform future case studies in computer science education for graduate students from non-scientific backgrounds.

Practical implications

This paper reveals that learning by doing/experimenting needs to be accompanied by in-depth reflection to enable students to transfer the acquired knowledge and skills to other settings and contexts beyond that of the lesson, task, or project in hand.

Originality/value

There is little research published on introductory programming courses offered to non-specialized students (i.e. students from non-scientific backgrounds). This study contributes to the body of research on how to effectively engage these students in programming courses informed by John Dewey's pragmatic lens/epistemological lens.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

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