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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1997

Jennifer Rowley

Suggests that an essential prerequisite to the design of instruments for measuring quality in higher education is an appreciation of the complexities associated with the…

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4108

Abstract

Suggests that an essential prerequisite to the design of instruments for measuring quality in higher education is an appreciation of the complexities associated with the nature of quality measurement and enhancement in higher education. The central role of perceptions and expectations and the complexity of the contributions of the different types of customer are crucial. Explores the following issues: what quality is, which quality is important, and the ownership of quality. Identifies aspects of the educational experience that differentiate education from other service experiences as including exclusivity of access; the role of the customer in the process and the longitudinal nature of the educational experience. Proposes the concept of a service contract, to be established in the first instance with students, as one approach to managing expectations and perceptions in order to generate more positive quality judgements.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Leigh Robinson

Public leisure service providers have become increasingly conscious of the need to improve the quality of their service provision as a result of increasing customer…

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4160

Abstract

Public leisure service providers have become increasingly conscious of the need to improve the quality of their service provision as a result of increasing customer expectations, growing competition and government legislation. This paper presents the findings of a survey carried out in the UK, investigating the role of quality schemes in public leisure services. The study shows that a significant proportion of public leisure service providers are using quality schemes to manage the quality of their facilities. In addition, the findings show that managers are using quality schemes to improve customer satisfaction and improve management effectiveness. Finally, the study provides evidence of the positive effect of quality schemes upon service delivery aspects of these facilities, but little evidence of the financial advantages of such schemes.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1992

Ellen Day

Reports on a study attempting to understand whether, and how,service providers try to communicate quality of their services viaadvertising. Finds that few quality cues are…

Abstract

Reports on a study attempting to understand whether, and how, service providers try to communicate quality of their services via advertising. Finds that few quality cues are present in magazine advertising for services. Offers examples and suggestions for the effective conveying of quality through advertising messages.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1997

Sherriff T.K. Luk

Competition in Hong Kong’s tourism market is very intense and local travel agencies have to improve the quality of their service in order to enhance their competitive…

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7602

Abstract

Competition in Hong Kong’s tourism market is very intense and local travel agencies have to improve the quality of their service in order to enhance their competitive edge. This industry‐specific research examines the relationship between marketing culture and the perceived service quality of outbound tours. The author sampled tour escorts and asked them to describe the patterns and characteristics of their firms’ marketing culture. Tour members who had just returned from outbound tours were also sampled for the measurement of their perceptions of the quality of tours. The findings indicate a positive relationship between marketing culture and service quality. High quality service can be delivered when a travel agency successfully fosters a customer‐oriented marketing culture characterized with a strong emphasis on service quality orientation and interpersonal relationships. In a high‐contact service business such as tourism service, marketers must understand that commitment to quality service and service mentality are integral elements in the firm’s culture and that a positive attitude towards interpersonal relationships must be held by service employees.

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International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1988

John Haywood‐Farmer

A model of service quality is developed which includes three groups of service quality components: physical and procedural, behavioural, and judgemental. Classification…

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5691

Abstract

A model of service quality is developed which includes three groups of service quality components: physical and procedural, behavioural, and judgemental. Classification schemes for service operations based on their relative degrees of labour intensity, process and product customisation, and contact and interaction between the customer and the service organisation are reviewed and synthesised. The application of the service quality model to different classes of service organisations are discussed.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 8 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 27 March 2007

Ashok Kumar Sahu

The aim of this study is to measure the perceptions of the Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU) library users as they relate to quality service and to determine how far the…

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4886

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to measure the perceptions of the Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU) library users as they relate to quality service and to determine how far the JNU library has succeeded in delivering such service to its users.

Design/methodology/approach

The research was carried out among the students and faculty members of the JNU. A questionnaire was used as the data gathering instrument. The instruments for data collection consisted of structured questions. All the closed ended questions were designed to elicit responses on a five point Likert scale to measure both respondent satisfaction and perception of service quality. Analysis of the collected data made use of the chi‐square method.

Findings

The results would appear to indicate that the JNU library is not lacking in quality of service. However, we need to note that quality information service is about helping users to define and satisfy their information needs, building their confidence in using information retrieval systems, and making the whole activity of working with library staff a pleasurable experience. To achieve total quality in information service the JNU library should provide a comprehensive information programme that is predicated on the needs and activities of the users.

Originality/value

This study may help those libraries, who are seriously interested to develop user satisfaction and provide better service to the user. This study also suggests some recommendations about increasing the user satisfaction in the library service.

Details

Library Review, vol. 56 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2012

Zhuo Zhang and Yanyu Wang

The purpose of this paper is to establish a three‐dimensional service house of quality (HOQ). The new service HOQ adds a dimension of quality economics to solve the…

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625

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to establish a three‐dimensional service house of quality (HOQ). The new service HOQ adds a dimension of quality economics to solve the problems of economic evaluation in the process of transferring customer requirements into service characteristics by traditional HOQ.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the traditional two‐dimensional HOQ, this paper constructs a three‐dimension service HOQ by adding an economic dimension into the traditional structure, so that the transformation process from customer requirements into service characteristics can be evaluated with quality economic perspective. The key concern of this new model is to balance the quality improvement and economic gain of a service. The other improvement of this paper is that it uses structural equations to present the coefficient matrix in the new HOQ model to avoid human errors in the evaluation. A case study is used to verify the effectiveness of the new model.

Findings

Quality gains and costs should be considered in service design and quality improvement. The three‐dimensional service HOQ uses the dimension of quality economics to balance customer requirements and service characteristics, which is more effective than the traditional one.

Practical implications

The method exposed in the paper can be used by service companies for decision making in service design and quality improvement.

Originality/value

This paper establishes a new three‐dimensional HOQ, by which quality economics can be effectively analyzed in service design and quality improvement.

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2011

Sheilagh M. Resnick and Mark D. Griffiths

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate service quality in a UK privately funded alcohol treatment clinic.

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1299

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate service quality in a UK privately funded alcohol treatment clinic.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were gathered via interviews with two groups of participants using the SERVQUAL questionnaire. The first group comprised 32 patients and the second 15 clinic staff. The SERVQUAL instrument measures service quality expectations and perceptions across five service dimensions and identifies gaps between service expectations and perceptions of what was delivered.

Findings

Patients' service quality expectations were exceeded on four of five dimensions. However, staff members felt services fell below expectations on four of five dimensions with the “reliability” service dimension emerging as the common service element falling below expectations for both participant groups. It was concluded that achieving consistent service delivery and increasing empathy between staff and patients improves overall service quality perceptions.

Research limitations/implications

The paper relies on self‐report methods from a relatively small number of individuals.

Originality/value

There have been limited research studies measuring alcohol treatment service quality in the private sector.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 27 February 2009

Cheng Yu Sum and Chi Leung Hui

The purpose of this paper is to investigate which dimension of salespersons' service quality is of most importance for customer loyalty in a fashion chain stores setting…

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7234

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate which dimension of salespersons' service quality is of most importance for customer loyalty in a fashion chain stores setting. It also aims to assess the effects of two retail environmental factors (price level and customers' demographic variables) on the customer loyalty of salespersons service quality.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses the SERVQUAL service quality instrument with modification in measuring the salespersons' service quality in the Hong Kong fashion retail environment. In order to measure customer loyalty in fashion chain stores, multi‐item measures were used to collect data on repatronage intentions, word‐of‐mouth intentions, and satisfaction. A total of 232 surveys were administrated to shoppers who were leaving a fashion chain store in Hong Kong.

Findings

The results showed that the empathy dimension of salesperson service quality is the most important for customer loyalty in Hong Kong's fashion chain stores but the empathy dimension of salespersons' service quality in fashion retail stores could not be affected by these two retail environmental factors. Furthermore, the salespersons' service quality in the reliability dimension is significantly impacted by the customers' demographic characteristics, but not by price level set by fashion chain stores.

Research limitations/implications

The study was carried out in four popular retail districts of Hong Kong and the results obtained may not be generalized to the country as a whole. The findings that are relevant in a fashion retail setting may not applicable in other retail environments.

Originality/value

The findings can direct fashion retailers to improve the specific service dimensions and work to provide customers with more value through services which will consequently improve internal and external standards of quality and performances in fashion retail settings, thus bringing about repeat customers and increased profitability.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1998

David Camilleri and Mark O’Callaghan

The study applies the principles behind the SERVQUAL model and uses Donabedian’s framework to compare and contrast Malta’s public and private hospital care service quality

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6652

Abstract

The study applies the principles behind the SERVQUAL model and uses Donabedian’s framework to compare and contrast Malta’s public and private hospital care service quality. Through the identification of 16 service quality indicators and the use of a Likert‐type scale, two questionnaires were developed. The first questionnaire measured patient pre‐admission expectations for public and private hospital service quality (in respect of one another). It also determined the weighted importance given to the different service quality indicators. The second questionnaire measured patient perceptions of provided service quality. Results showed that private hospitals are expected to offer a higher quality service, particularly in the “hotel services”, but it was the public sector that was exceeding its patients’ expectations by the wider margin. A number of implications for public and private hospital management and policy makers were identified.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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