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Publication date: 20 October 2015

Michael Preece

This research explores perceptions of knowledge management processes held by managers and employees in a service industry. To date, empirical research on knowledge…

Abstract

This research explores perceptions of knowledge management processes held by managers and employees in a service industry. To date, empirical research on knowledge management in the service industry is sparse. This research seeks to examine absorptive capacity and its four capabilities of acquisition, assimilation, transformation and exploitation and their impact on effective knowledge management. All of these capabilities are strategies that enable external knowledge to be recognized, imported and integrated into, and further developed within the organization effectively. The research tests the relationships between absorptive capacity and effective knowledge management through analysis of quantitative data (n = 549) drawn from managers and employees in 35 residential aged care organizations in Western Australia. Responses were analysed using Partial Least Square-based Structural Equation Modelling. Additional analysis was conducted to assess if the job role (of manager or employee) and three industry context variables of profit motive, size of business and length of time the organization has been in business, impacted on the hypothesized relationships.

Structural model analysis examines the relationships between variables as hypothesized in the research framework. Analysis found that absorptive capacity and the four capabilities correlated significantly with effective knowledge management, with absorptive capacity explaining 56% of the total variability for effective knowledge management. Findings from this research also show that absorptive capacity and the four capabilities provide a useful framework for examining knowledge management in the service industry. Additionally, there were no significant differences in the perceptions held between managers and employees, nor between respondents in for-profit and not-for-profit organizations. Furthermore, the size of the organization and length of time the organization has been in business did not impact on absorptive capacity, the four capabilities and effective knowledge management.

The research considers implications for business in light of these findings. The role of managers in providing leadership across the knowledge management process was confirmed, as well as the importance of guiding routines and knowledge sharing throughout the organization. Further, the results indicate that within the participating organizations there are discernible differences in the way that some organizations manage their knowledge, compared to others. To achieve effective knowledge management, managers need to provide a supportive workplace culture, facilitate strong employee relationships, encourage employees to seek out new knowledge, continually engage in two-way communication with employees and provide up-to-date policies and procedures that guide employees in doing their work. The implementation of knowledge management strategies has also been shown in this research to enhance the delivery and quality of residential aged care.

Details

Sustaining Competitive Advantage Via Business Intelligence, Knowledge Management, and System Dynamics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-707-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2006

G. Ronald Gilbert and Cleopatra Veloutsou

This paper seeks to identify service satisfaction measures that can be used across industries.

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13331

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to identify service satisfaction measures that can be used across industries.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper attempts to identify empirically core characteristics of customer satisfaction ratings across six industries based on the ratings of 10,835 respondents within the USA. The industries included are banking and finance, retail, government, grocery stores, hospitality/sports, and restaurants.

Findings

The paper finds that banking and finance and hospitality/sports entertainment were rated highest by their patrons. Those dealing with government, general retail and moderately priced fast food restaurants received lower service satisfaction ratings. Differences were also found among respondent characteristics (i.e. age, gender, education and ethnicity/race).

Research limitations/implications

The study sample was selected from organizations readily available to the research team. Future studies based on systematic random samples would enhance the generalizability of the findings.

Originality/value

The results provide a basis from which cross industry benchmarking and the identification of best practices can be captured and used by practitioners.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 20 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2019

Jinwon Kang, Jong-Seok Kim and Seonmi Seol

The purpose of this study is to reveal the similarities and differences between the manufacturing and service industries in their prioritization of technologies and public…

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863

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to reveal the similarities and differences between the manufacturing and service industries in their prioritization of technologies and public research and development (R&D) roles, along with the complementation of properties of technology and public R&D role in the context of Fourth Industrial Revolution.

Design/methodology/approach

Two rounds of Delphi surveys were designed to meet the purpose of this study, which used rigorous triangulation techniques. The Delphi method was combined with the brainstorming method in the first-round Delphi survey, while the second-round Delphi survey focused on experts’ judgments. Finally, language network analysis was performed on the properties of technology and public R&D roles to complement the data analyses regarding prioritization.

Findings

This study identifies different prioritizations of five similar key technologies in each industry, so that it can note different technological impacts to the two industries in the Fourth Industrial Revolution. Smart factory technology is the first priority in the manufacturing industry, whereas artificial intelligence is the first priority in the service industry. The properties of the three common technologies: artificial intelligence, big data and Internet of things in both industries are summarized in hyper-intelligence on hyper-connectivity. Moreover, it is found that different technological priorities in the service and manufacturing industries require different approaches to public R&D roles, while public R&D roles cover market failure, system failure and government failure. The highest priority public R&D role for the service industry is the emphasis of non-R&D roles. Public R&D role to solve dy-functions, focus basic technologies and support challenging areas of R&D is prioritized at the highest for the manufacturing industry.

Originality/value

This study of the different prioritizations of technologies in the manufacturing and service industries offers practical lessons for executive officers, managers and policy-makers. They, by noting the different technological impacts in the manufacturing and service industries, can prepare for current actions and establish the priority of technology for R&D influencing the future paths of their industries in the context of the Fourth Industrial Revolution. While managers in the service industry should pay greater attention to the technological content of hyper-intelligence and hyper-connectivity, managers in the manufacturing industry should consider smart factory and robot technology.

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1995

Glenn F. Ross

The role of tourism/hospitality industry management in ensuring service quality is now generally regarded as being of considerable importance. Notwithstanding this…

Abstract

The role of tourism/hospitality industry management in ensuring service quality is now generally regarded as being of considerable importance. Notwithstanding this, relatively little is known about the preconceptions and expectations regarding the management role that potential tourism/hospitality industry employees bring to the workplace. This study has examined the expected problem‐solving styles of hospitality industry management when faced with a complaint about visitor‐staff conflict. The sample was drawn from school leavers in a major district community, many of whom would soon seek employment and careers in the tourism/hospitality industry. Two major problem‐solving styles were identified, one involving Investigation of the complaint, and one involving Avoidance and possibly rudeness. Major Service Quality Ideals were also identified as predictors of each management problem‐solving style. Finally, the implications of these findings for tourism/hospitality industry management and for employees are explored.

Details

The Tourist Review, vol. 50 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0251-3102

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Olga Polyakova and Mohammed T Mirza

The purpose of this paper is to review the concept of perceived service quality in the fitness industry by considering the service-dominant logic (Vargo and Lusch, 2004…

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2214

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the concept of perceived service quality in the fitness industry by considering the service-dominant logic (Vargo and Lusch, 2004) and examining existing service quality models in the context of sport and fitness.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper critically reviews generic and industry-specific models of service quality in the fitness industry. The examination of the models is intended to identify the role that the perspective of customers and the dynamics of service co-creation play in these models.

Findings

Consideration of the context in a particular industry plays an important role in the development of service quality models. If underestimated, it can result in a model being inadequate or having limited explanatory potential. The review shows that both generic and fitness industry-specific models have methodological and conceptual limitations. This requires researchers to consider developing new contextual models that acknowledge service as co-creation of experience/value between suppliers and customers; and the goal of this co-creation as fulfilment of customers’ aspirations. Such an approach brings a new light to the meaning of “a customer’s perspective” and emphasises the dynamics of service co-creation in the fitness industry.

Practical implications

The study provides an agenda for future research to consider perceived service quality models from the customers’ perspective. It suggests researchers to take into account various factors of consumer behaviour (e.g. motivation) which are unique to sport and fitness services. Also, managers of fitness facilities need to revisit their tools for capturing customers’ perceptions and to update the areas included in customer satisfaction surveys.

Originality/value

The paper provides an insight into the role of co-creation for service quality in fitness services. It contributes towards establishing revised relations between service quality in fitness and contextual industry-specific factors suggested by numerous studies previously.

Details

Sport, Business and Management: An International Journal, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-678X

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2011

Olga Godlevskaja, Jos van Iwaarden and Ton van der Wiele

This paper aims to propose a framework that can be used for analysing services in the automotive industry.

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8494

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to propose a framework that can be used for analysing services in the automotive industry.

Design/methodology/approach

Existing categorisation schemes for services are investigated and evaluated in terms of their applicability to services in the automotive industry.

Findings

Services categorisation schemes are grouped under eight service paradigms, expressing the understanding that various authors had about services in different times and contexts.

Research limitations/implications

The remarks are limited to the automotive industry.

Practical implications

The paper suggests services classification schemes, which can be effectively applied to automotive services in order to generate valuable managerial insights.

Originality/value

This paper provides an overview over multiple services categorisation schemes existing in the literature.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1983

L.W. Hardy and E. Davies

Analyses issues surrounding the marketing of services in the UK construction industry. Examines the state of the UK construction industry, and its impact on the gross…

Abstract

Analyses issues surrounding the marketing of services in the UK construction industry. Examines the state of the UK construction industry, and its impact on the gross national product. Highlights the elements of desk and empirical research used for the study, each divided into objective and methodology. Examines the differences in marketing techniques used for products and services. Discusses the difference between construction services and other services. Outlines the different stages of competitive tendering, and examines why this business method is not productive for the construction industry. Concludes that the marketing of services in the UK construction industry is characterised by both threats and opportunities.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1985

Since the first Volume of this Bibliography there has been an explosion of literature in all the main areas of business. The researcher and librarian have to be able to…

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15636

Abstract

Since the first Volume of this Bibliography there has been an explosion of literature in all the main areas of business. The researcher and librarian have to be able to uncover specific articles devoted to certain topics. This Bibliography is designed to help. Volume III, in addition to the annotated list of articles as the two previous volumes, contains further features to help the reader. Each entry within has been indexed according to the Fifth Edition of the SCIMP/SCAMP Thesaurus and thus provides a full subject index to facilitate rapid information retrieval. Each article has its own unique number and this is used in both the subject and author index. The first Volume of the Bibliography covered seven journals published by MCB University Press. This Volume now indexes 25 journals, indicating the greater depth, coverage and expansion of the subject areas concerned.

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Management Decision, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2015

Faisal Talib and Zillur Rahman

Despite the potential benefits of total quality management (TQM) articulated by quality experts and practitioners, these benefits are not easy to achieve in practice. Many…

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3543

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the potential benefits of total quality management (TQM) articulated by quality experts and practitioners, these benefits are not easy to achieve in practice. Many service industries have found difficult to implement TQM successfully. The present study investigates and categorizes the barriers to a successful implementation of TQM program in the service industry. The purpose of this paper is to understand TQM barriers and prioritize their relative importance by ranking them in the service industry.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on previously published literature on TQM barriers in service industry and after discussions with quality experts, this study utilizes a set of 12 barriers to TQM as identified by the authors of TQM barriers to accomplish the objectives of the present study. The 12 barriers were divided into three categories. These barriers were prioritized and ranked using an analytic hierarchy process (AHP) approach, a multi-criteria decision-making process.

Findings

In this research, the category “managerial issues” was found to be the most important, followed by “people-oriented issues” and “organizational issues” based on their priority weights. The results have also highlighted that the barrier “lack of communication” was the most significant among all the other barriers. It was followed by “lack of top-management commitment,” “employee’s resistance to change,” and “lack of coordination between departments.” The least significant barrier was “high turnover at management level.”

Practical implications

The study ranks the barriers, from the most important to the least important, which will allow managers and practitioners in the service industry to decide which barriers they need to pay attention to and work on for a successful implementation of TQM.

Originality/value

The strength of this study is the development of a comprehensive model for the investigation and prioritization of barriers that the service industry experiences when implementing a TQM program. Presenting TQM barriers in the form of AHP-based model and categorizing barriers is a new effort in the area of TQM.

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Article
Publication date: 10 January 2022

Mohammad G. Nejad

The financial industry offers a unique setting to study innovations. Financial innovations have fueled the growth of economies, markets and societies. The financial…

Abstract

Purpose

The financial industry offers a unique setting to study innovations. Financial innovations have fueled the growth of economies, markets and societies. The financial industry has successfully become the breeding ground for innovative services, processes, business models and technologies. This study seeks to provide a holistic view of the literature on financial innovations, synthesize the research findings and offer future directions for research in light of three market developments that are disrupting the industry and opening up a new era for the financial services industry. Disruptions from within and outside the industry offer new generations of radically innovative services. Moreover, new generations of consumers differ from previous generations in their needs and wants and look for innovative ways to handle their financial needs. Finally, significant developments related to financial innovations have emerged in Asia and developing countries.

Design/methodology/approach

This study systematically reviews the academic research literature on financial innovations in two phases. The first phase provides a quantitative review of 546 journal articles published between 1990 and 2018. In the second phase, the study synthesizes the extant research on financial innovations and maps them in five research areas: firms' introduction and adoption of FIs, financial innovation development, the outcomes of financial innovations, regulations and intellectual property, and consumers.

Findings

The analysis found that disciplines differ with regard to the employed research methodologies, the units of analysis, sources of data and the innovations they examined. A positive trend in the number of published articles during this period is observed. However, studies have primarily focused on the USA and Europe and less so on other parts of the world. The literature synthesis further identifies research gaps in the available research that highlight future research opportunities in light of the three market disruptions. The financial services industry is on the brink of a new era due to disruptions from within and outside the industry and the entrance of new generations of consumers. Moreover, the financial industry has successfully become the breeding ground for innovative services, processes and business models. Therefore, financial innovations offer promising opportunities for bridging the gap between research on product and service innovations.

Research limitations/implications

The work provides a holistic and systematic overview of extant research on financial innovations and highlights future research opportunities in light of the three disruptive market developments. It helps researchers take advantage of the opportunities in studying financial innovations while maintaining industry relevance.

Originality/value

The study is the first to review and synthesize the academic research literature on financial innovations across marketing, finance and innovation disciplines. In addition, the study highlights three primary disruptive forces in the financial industry and identifies future research directions in light of these disruptive forces.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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