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Article
Publication date: 20 May 2021

Heejung Park

In the uncertainty of the global economy, many young adults have financial independence from their parents and are making financial decisions in a difficult financial…

Abstract

Purpose

In the uncertainty of the global economy, many young adults have financial independence from their parents and are making financial decisions in a difficult financial environment. This study aims to focus on debt management behavior for young adult consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

The data is from the 2010 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (NLSY97). The NLSY97 includes information on US young consumers’ financial, demographic and attitudinal characteristics, as well as various socio-economic conditions, making it convenient to explore the relationships between financial behavior and psychology variables. In the 2010 survey, 4,110 young consumers were interviewed.

Findings

The results show that self-determination and motivation alone cannot bring about a direct change in financial behavior without the mediation of financial psychology. Therefore, consumer finance research should consider debt-management behavior by presenting different strategies than those currently used.

Originality/value

In the self-determination theory, emphasizes the internal grounds for distinguishing self-regulation from personality development and behavior. Specially, this paper deals with the financial behavior of young adult consumers through self-determination theory.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 31 March 2022

Praveen Kulkarni, Prayag Gokhale, Y.M. Satish and Basavaraj Tigadi

This study aims to investigate gamification-based training program through the lens of self-determination theory and in the context of corporate training programs. It…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate gamification-based training program through the lens of self-determination theory and in the context of corporate training programs. It integrates the self-determination theory, game elements and learning outcomes in gamified training programs to derive insights.

Design/methodology/approach

Data is sourced from software development companies operating in the city of Bangalore in India. It applies the partial least square structural equation modeling to investigate the relationship between the self-determination learning theory and game elements and the impact it has on learning outcomes.

Findings

As a precursor to the development of a game-like learning ecosystem, the authors study the perception of trainers and human resource managers toward game-based training programs in the organization. The authors find that game-based learning makes training more engaging, immersive and contextual for the learners.

Research limitations/implications

The study is based on a specific sector, i.e. software development companies, and so the results may lack in generalizability. Future research, therefore, may consider other industrial sectors such as manufacturing, banking and telecom to understand the relationship between the constructs.

Practical implications

This study provides insights for the trainers, human resource managers and academicians on the effectiveness of gamification-based training programs. It also provides information on how the learning theory can be leveraged to understand gamification-based training programs.

Social implications

This work fulfills an identified need of the training industry to understand new methods of training with an aim to improve the learning outcomes among the learners.

Originality/value

This study provides a deep understanding on the effectiveness of training tools such as gamified training programs in enhancing and improving the learning outcomes among the learners.

Details

Organization Management Journal, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1541-6518

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Paul Gibson and Silvia Seibold

The purpose of this paper is to explain how the role of marketing for luxury brands can be re-thought in order to ensure that such brands establish a strong connection…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explain how the role of marketing for luxury brands can be re-thought in order to ensure that such brands establish a strong connection between their luxury image and positive social and environmental values.

Design/methodology/approach

The findings are based upon qualitative empirical research which informed a new categorisation of consumer motivations, through the application of self-determination theory which shows how concerns for environmental and social sustainability can be integrated with individual psychological needs.

Findings

The findings provide a deep understanding of consumers of luxury-eco products which could be used by marketing practitioners to shape socially responsible purchasing decisions.

Research limitations/implications

The research was designed for theory building, not theory-testing, so future research would be needed to study the efficacy of the recommended strategies for encouraging eco-luxury behaviour.

Practical implications

To increase the likelihood of practical applications, the authors follow the presentation of their findings with suggestions and examples for marketing to each of the consumer types identified by their research.

Social implications

The findings of this research have implications of a global, environmental and social kind. The societal adoption of eco-luxury consumption is about educating consumer desire, shifting it from its current focus on personal satisfaction, to a higher level of personal and social flourishing.

Originality/value

The findings effectively support the claims of self-determination theory by demonstrating how and why consumer motivations differ and how an improved sense of well-being can be achieved through internalised levels of self-determination.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 41 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 August 2021

Bodo Lang, Joya Kemper, Rebecca Dolan and Gavin Northey

The purpose of this paper is to explore why and how sharing economy users switch from consumer (e.g. Airbnb guest) to provider (e.g. Airbnb host), and how this helps…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore why and how sharing economy users switch from consumer (e.g. Airbnb guest) to provider (e.g. Airbnb host), and how this helps enrich self-determination theory.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted an exploratory study with users who had been consumers (i.e. Airbnb guests) and had switched to being providers (i.e. Airbnb hosts).

Findings

Consumers switch to being providers across four phases: “catalysts”, “enablers”, “drivers” and “glue”. The authors identify various extrinsic and intrinsic motivations unique to the switch and map these against motivators postulated by self-determination theory.

Research limitations/implications

The authors propose a four-phase process through which consumers become providers. The present study enriches self-determination theory by showing how users' psychosocial needs are addressed through a variety of intrinsic and extrinsic factors that are unique to the role switch. The authors further show how the importance of the three key psychosocial self-determination needs varies through the switch process, thus providing a more nuanced understanding of users' drive for self-determination.

Practical implications

This study offers several recommendations to help sharing economy platforms improve their processes and communication to encourage a greater number of consumers to switch roles and become providers. These recommendations address two aspects: (1) encouraging consumers to switch roles and become providers (i.e. acquisition) and following this (2) encouraging providers to continue to perform that role (i.e. retention).

Originality/value

Much research has investigated why users become consumers (e.g. Airbnb guests) or providers (e.g. Airbnb hosts) in the sharing economy. However, research to date has not fully embraced the two-sided nature of the sharing economy. Therefore, this is the first paper to explore why and how consumers switch roles and become providers in the sharing economy, and how this helps enrich self-determination theory.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 March 2022

Georg-Friedrich Göhler, Judith Hattke and Markus Göbel

This paper aims to determine whether prosocial motivation acts as a mediator between the individual motivation types of self-determination theory and knowledge sharing.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to determine whether prosocial motivation acts as a mediator between the individual motivation types of self-determination theory and knowledge sharing.

Design/methodology/approach

A partial least squares structural equation model (PLS-SEM) based on data collection (N = 303) ) was calculated, using “Smart PLS 3” software.

Findings

In respect of the influence of individual motivation types on knowledge sharing, it was found that prosocial motivation provides indirect mediation for external motivation and complementary mediation for introjected motivation, whereas it has no mediation effect on intrinsic and identified motivation.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should consider the use of prosocial motivation as a mediator to reveal indirect effects that, otherwise, are at risk of remaining hidden.

Practical implications

To foster knowledge sharing within organizations, measures should be taken to increase external, introjected and prosocial motivation, as it was found that these types of motivation have a significant positive impact on knowledge sharing.

Originality/value

The current unanswered question – whether or not prosocial motivation acts as a mediator between the motivation types of self-determination theory and knowledge sharing – is examined, thereby providing insights into the hitherto largely unexplored role of prosocial motivation in knowledge-sharing models.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 July 2018

Bishakha Mazumdar, Amy M. Warren and Kathryne E. Dupré

Few studies aim to uniquely conceptualize the experiences of bridge employees after they enter the workforce. Supported by the psychological contract theory and the…

Abstract

Purpose

Few studies aim to uniquely conceptualize the experiences of bridge employees after they enter the workforce. Supported by the psychological contract theory and the self-determination theory, the purpose of this paper is to contribute to the understanding of the bridge employment experience by examining how the expectations of bridge employees shape their experiences.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper first reviews the extant literature on bridge employment. It then discusses the psychological contract theory and the self-determination theory, and examines the expectations of bridge employees through the theoretical perspectives of these two theories, to examine experiences in bridge employment.

Findings

Discord in the bridge employment relationship may be attributed to a lack of understanding of the implicit expectations of bridge employees. More specifically, unmet expectations may be detrimental to the bridge employment experience, and ultimately jeopardize both employer and employee outcomes.

Research limitations/implications

This paper examines expectations and experiences of bridge employees from a theoretical perspective. Theoretical tenets are utilized to analyze how and why implicit expectations may influence bridge employees in ways that result in detrimental outcomes for both employers and employees.

Practical implications

This paper sheds light on why bridge employment arrangements may result in adverse outcomes. Specifically, when there is a lack of understanding between bridge employees’ expectations and experiences, both individual and organizational outcomes may be impaired. An improved understanding of the bridge employment experience will likely result in an enhanced working relationship between bridge employees and employers, and minimize misunderstandings about this cohort of the workforce.

Originality/value

Using the guidelines of the psychological contract theory and the self-determination theory, we develop a model to examine how expectation of bridge employees may affect the experiences and ultimately, the outcomes of bridge employment. The authors also identify factors uniquely applicable to bridge employees. This is the first paper that examines the experiences of bridge employees through such theoretical perspectives.

Book part
Publication date: 2 October 2003

Kennon M Sheldon, Daniel B Turban, Kenneth G Brown, Murray R Barrick and Timothy A Judge

In this chapter we argue that self-determination theory (SDT; Deci & Ryan, 2000) provides a useful conceptual tool for organizational researchers, one that complements…

Abstract

In this chapter we argue that self-determination theory (SDT; Deci & Ryan, 2000) provides a useful conceptual tool for organizational researchers, one that complements traditional work motivation theories. First, we review SDT, showing that it has gone far beyond the “intrinsic versus extrinsic motivation” dichotomy with which it began. Then we show how the theory might be applied to better understand a variety of organizational phenomena, including the positive effects of transformational leadership, the nature of “true” goal-commitment, the determinants of employees’ training motivation, and the positive impact of certain human resource practices. We note that SDT may yield significant new understanding of work motivation, and suggest opportunities to refine the theory for research on work-related phenomena.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-174-3

Book part
Publication date: 20 July 2017

Elizabeth P. Karam, William L. Gardner, Daniel P. Gullifor, Lori L. Tribble and Mingwei Li

Academic and practitioner attention to the constructs of authentic leadership and work engagement and their implications for organizations has grown dramatically over the…

Abstract

Academic and practitioner attention to the constructs of authentic leadership and work engagement and their implications for organizations has grown dramatically over the past decade. Consideration of the implications of these constructs for high-performance human resource practices (HPHRP) is limited, however. In this monograph, we present a conceptual model that integrates authentic leadership/followership theory with theory and research on HPHRP. Then, we apply this model to systematically consider the implications of skill-enhancing, motivation-enhancing, and opportunity-enhancing HR practices in combination with authentic leadership for authentic followership, follower work engagement, and follower performance. We contend that authentic leadership, through various influences processes, promotes HPHRP, and vice versa, to help foster enhanced work engagement. By cultivating greater work engagement, individuals are motivated to bring their best, most authentic selves to the workplace and are more likely to achieve higher levels of both well-being and performance.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-709-6

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 March 2021

Samar Rahi, Majeed Mustafa Othman Mansour, Malek Alharafsheh and Mahmoud Alghizzawi

In this era of digital technology, the banking sector has revolutionized its operations by using web-based Internet banking services. However, the success of these…

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Abstract

Purpose

In this era of digital technology, the banking sector has revolutionized its operations by using web-based Internet banking services. However, the success of these financial services is dependent on Internet banking user continuance intention instead of initial adoption. The current study develops a theoretical framework based on three well-known theories, namely the expectation–confirmation theory, self-determination theory (SDT) and the commitment trust theory, to investigate Internet banking user continuance intention towards use of Internet banking services.

Design/methodology/approach

Following positivist paradigm, a research survey was conducted towards Internet banking users of commercial banks. In response, 355 valid observations were retrieved and used for data analysis. For data analysis, this study has used a latest statistical approach, namely structural equation modelling (SEM).

Findings

This study has confirmed that factors underpinning the commitment trust theory, SDT and expectation–confirmation model have significant impact on Internet banking user continuance intention. The research model explained 68.4% of variance in determining Internet banking user continuance intention, which is substantial. The effect size analysis (f2) indicates that perceived usefulness is the most important factor among all other exogenous variables. The predictive relevance of the research model was found substantial Q2 50.3%. These findings confirmed that the research model has substantial power to predict Internet banking user continuance intention.

Practical implications

From a managerial perspective, findings of this research give deeper insight into financial advisors, bank managers and policy- makers to understand human motivation and expectation–confirmation factors in order to retain customers and gain return on Information Technology (IT) investment. Additionally, results suggest that attention should be given on user trust, which in turn boosts user intention towards continuance use of Internet banking services. Extension of the self-determination framework contributes to theory and augments e-commerce literature, especially in a post-adoption setting.

Originality/value

There are several studies that investigate Internet banking user pre-adoption behaviour. Therefore, less is discussed about the Internet banking user’s post-adoption behaviour. Findings of this study help financial advisors to comprehensively understand which factor influences Internet banking user behaviour towards continue use of Internet banking services.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 34 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 25 March 2019

Maarten Vansteenkiste, Nathalie Aelterman, Leen Haerens and Bart Soenens

Given the complexity of societal, technological, and economic challenges encountered by schools and teachers, one may wonder whether and how teachers can still optimally…

Abstract

Given the complexity of societal, technological, and economic challenges encountered by schools and teachers, one may wonder whether and how teachers can still optimally motivate their students. To adopt a motivating role in today’s ever-changing, even stormy, educational landscape, teachers need more than a checklist of motivating practices. They also need a fundamental theoretical perspective that can serve as a general source of inspiration for their everyday classroom practices across various situations and in interaction with different students. Herein, we argue that self-determination theory represents such a valuable perspective. In Part I, we discuss the satisfaction of learners’ psychological needs for autonomy, competence, and relatedness as a source of student motivation, engagement, and resilience. We also present a recently developed circular model involving a broad variety of motivating (i.e., need-supportive) and demotivating (i.e., need-thwarting) teaching practices appealing to these three needs. In Part II, we discuss several implications of this circular model, thereby discussing the diverse pathways that lead to student need satisfaction, motivation, and engagement as well as highlighting teachers’ capacity for calibration to deal with uncertainty and change. We conclude that school principals and teachers do well to invest in both students’ and teachers’ psychological need experiences, such that they become skilled in flexibly adjusting themselves to diversity, uncertainty, and change.

Details

Motivation in Education at a Time of Global Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-613-4

Keywords

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