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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

Adam P. Heath and Don Scott

Evaluates the applicability of self‐concept and product image congruity theory within the new motor vehicle market. By utilising competitive product offerings, and by…

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Abstract

Evaluates the applicability of self‐concept and product image congruity theory within the new motor vehicle market. By utilising competitive product offerings, and by employing the perceptions of actual owners, the paper provides a true market assessment of the applicability of the theory. Respondents were examined using self‐concept and product value constructs and their responses were used to test a number of hypotheses. Among others, the results of analysis of variance indicated that when different brands of motor vehicles were physically similar, owners perceived no difference between their own self‐concepts and the self‐concepts they attributed to owners of competing product brands. This finding differs from previous research conducted on other products and suggests a different orientation by owners of similar motor vehicles to that suggested by self‐concept theory.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 32 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2014

Jeffrey L. Herman and Stephen J. Zaccaro

This chapter examines the complexity of global leaders themselves. As global leadership research has begun to move beyond a limiting overemphasis on skills and…

Abstract

This chapter examines the complexity of global leaders themselves. As global leadership research has begun to move beyond a limiting overemphasis on skills and competencies, we merge one focus on the deep structure of leader cognition with a focus on cultural identity that has matured largely independently. In so doing, we seek to push the field toward answering the broader question of what makes a global leader sufficiently complex to handle the vast complexities of the role. We place the construct of self-concept complexity as central to the performance of global leaders in ways ranging from organizational performance to social and community responsibility. By advancing our understanding of the role of self-concept complexity in driving global leadership outcomes, this research seeks to spur further theoretical development and practical application toward a deeper comprehension of the complexity of truly global leaders.

Details

Advances in Global Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-479-4

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 12 July 2010

Jack Martin

Almost all historical accounts of psychological work related to the self-concept begin with the pioneering work of William James (e.g., Harter, 1996; Pajares & Schunk…

Abstract

Almost all historical accounts of psychological work related to the self-concept begin with the pioneering work of William James (e.g., Harter, 1996; Pajares & Schunk, 2002, 2005; Roeser et al., 2006). James' distinction between the self as knower and agent (the I-self) and the self as known and object (the Me-self), in the famous Chap. 10, on self-consciousness, in his Principles of Psychology (1890), undoubtedly informs much subsequent work on the self-concept (a term that James never used himself). In particular, the general idea that the self is made up of different constituents (e.g., the Me-self contains material, social, and spiritual selves) arranged hierarchically is still very much a basic structural assumption in many contemporary theories of the self-concept, just as James' assumption that the I-self can create and monitor a variety of Me-selves anchors much self-concept methodology and process theorizing. With respect to the general aims of self-concept research, James' framing of self-esteem (a term he did use) also has been extremely influential on subsequent generations of both self-esteem and self-concept researchers. For James, self-esteem is a feeling that “depends entirely on what we back ourselves to be and do” (James, 1981, p. 310), a feeling that depends on the success with which we achieve those things we set out to achieve.2

Details

The Decade Ahead: Theoretical Perspectives on Motivation and Achievement
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-111-5

Book part
Publication date: 8 August 2005

Anthony R. Wheeler, M. Ronald Buckley, Jonathon R.B. Halbesleben, Robyn L. Brouer and Gerald R. Ferris

“Fit” as a human resources decision criterion has emerged as an active body of research in recent years, but its “elusiveness” as a scientific construct, noted more than a…

Abstract

“Fit” as a human resources decision criterion has emerged as an active body of research in recent years, but its “elusiveness” as a scientific construct, noted more than a decade ago by Judge and Ferris, still remains. To best address this issue, this chapter proposes an integrative theory of multidimensional fit that encompasses five relevant (and distinct) streams of current fit research: Person-Organization Fit, Person-Vocation Fit, Person-Job Fit, Person-Preferences for Culture Fit, and Person-Team Fit. It is proposed that these five dimensions of fit relate to an individual's self-concept; moreover, an individual assesses multidimensional fit utilizing a social cognitive decision-making process called prototype matching. By assessing fit across multiple dimensions, an individual can both gain a social identity and expand the self-concept, which explains the motive to fit. Testable propositions are formulated, and implications for multidimensional fit across the employment lifecycle are discussed. Furthermore, directions for future fit research are provided.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-215-3

Book part
Publication date: 20 November 2013

Dennis M. McInerney and Ronnel B. King

The aims of this study were (1) to examine the relationships among achievement goals, self-concept, learning strategies and self-regulation for post-secondary Indigenous…

Abstract

Purpose

The aims of this study were (1) to examine the relationships among achievement goals, self-concept, learning strategies and self-regulation for post-secondary Indigenous Australian and Native American students and (2) to investigate whether the relationships among these key variables were similar or different for the two groups.

Methodology

Students from the two Indigenous groups answered questionnaires assessing the relevant variables. Structural equation modelling (SEM) was used to analyse the data. Structure-oriented analysis was used to compare the two groups in terms of the strengths of the pathways, while level-oriented analysis was used to compare mean level differences.

Findings

Self-concept was found to positively predict deep learning and self-regulated learning, and these effects were mediated by achievement goals. Students who pursued mastery and social goals had more positive educational outcomes. Both structure and level-oriented differences were found.

Research implications

Drawing on two distinct research traditions – self-concept and achievement goals – this study explored the synergies between these two perspectives and showed how the key constructs drawn from each framework were associated with successful learning.

Practical implications

To improve learning outcomes, interventions may need to target students’ self-concept, mastery-oriented and socially oriented motivations.

Social implications

Supporting Indigenous students in their post-secondary education is an imperative. Psychologists have important insights to offer that can help achieve this noble aim.

Originality/value of the chapter

Research on Indigenous students has mostly adopted a deficiency model. In contrast, this study takes an explicitly positive perspective on Indigenous student success by focusing on the active psychological ingredients that facilitate successful learning.

Details

Seeding Success in Indigenous Australian Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-686-6

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 20 November 2013

Alexander Seeshing Yeung, Rhonda G. Craven, Ian Wilson, Jinnat Ali and Bingyi Li

Rural Australian patients continue to receive inadequate medical attention. One potential solution to this is to train Indigenous Australians to become medical doctors and…

Abstract

Purpose

Rural Australian patients continue to receive inadequate medical attention. One potential solution to this is to train Indigenous Australians to become medical doctors and return to their community to serve their people. The study aims to examine whether Indigenous medical students have a stronger intention to practice in underserved communities.

Methodology

A sample of Indigenous (N = 17) and non-Indigenous students (N = 188) from a medical program in Sydney was surveyed about their medical self-concept and motivation. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was conducted, group differences were tested, and correlation patterns were examined.

Findings

CFA found seven distinct factors – three medical self-concepts (affective, cognitive, and cultural competence), one motivation factor, and three work-related variables – intention to serve underserved communities (intention), understanding of Indigenous health (understanding), and work-related anxiety (anxiety). Indigenous medical students were higher in cultural competence, intention, and understanding. Both the affective and cognitive components of medical self-concept were more highly correlated with intention and understanding for Indigenous students than for non-Indigenous students.

Research implications

It is important to examine medical students’ self-concepts as well as their cultural characteristics and strengths that seed success in promoting service to underserved Indigenous communities.

Practical implications

The findings show that Indigenous medical students tended to understand Indigenous health issues better and to be more willing to serve underserved Indigenous communities. By enhancing both the affective and cognitive components of medical self-concepts, the “home-grown” medical education program is more likely to produce medical doctors to serve underserved communities with a good understanding of Indigenous health.

Details

Seeding Success in Indigenous Australian Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-686-6

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 March 2022

Deepanjana Varshney

Over the years, the impact of personality attributes on work behavior has constituted a broad research domain. The manner in which employees view themselves have been…

Abstract

Purpose

Over the years, the impact of personality attributes on work behavior has constituted a broad research domain. The manner in which employees view themselves have been regarded as significant in analyzing their work behavior and eventual employee performance from the organizational perspective. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between self-concept and performance, with resilience as a mediator and Machiavellianism as a moderating variable.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 271 employees from four medium-sized private sector companies in India after excluding missing data. Correlation, regression and Hayes Macro analysis were conducted to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Resilience mediates the relationship between self-concept and performance. Second, Machiavellianism moderated the relationship between self-concept and resilience and moderated the mediation effect of resilience on the relationship between self-concept and performance. The role of personality attributes has been found to profoundly impact the employee's perception of self and work performance. Resilience, which refers to the individual's ability to bounce back amidst adverse situations, is simultaneously moderated by one of the dark triad personalities, Machiavellianism.

Practical implications

Understanding the self-concept dimension, the dual effects of resilience and the Machiavellianism personality have gradually become immensely significant for improvising employee work performance in the organization.

Originality/value

This original research has examined a model of untested variables and explored the mediating effect of resilience by connecting self-concept to performance along with the moderated-mediated impact of Machiavellianism on the variables, which is a novel attempt.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 7 April 2021

Canh Minh Nguyen

The purpose of this study is to investigate the moral licensing effect of other in-group members' organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) on focal employees'…

1206

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the moral licensing effect of other in-group members' organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) on focal employees' organizational deviance through moral self-concept. This paper also examines the moderating role of in-group identification in the mediated relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The multilevel path analysis and bootstrapping technique are employed to analyze the findings of a sample of 340 employees in 56 workgroups in Vietnam.

Findings

The results demonstrate that moral self-concept mediates the positive relationship between other in-group members' OCB and focal employees' organizational deviance. Furthermore, the findings indicate that in-group identification strengthens the indirect effect of other in-group members' OCB on focal employees' organizational deviance via moral self-concept.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that managers should be aware of the potential negative consequences of OCB and the drawbacks of in-group identification in group contexts. In addition, practitioners should proactively prevent other in-group members' OCB from resulting in employees' organizational deviance.

Originality/value

This is the first study to examine the moral licensing effect of OCB on organizational deviance through the moral self-concept mechanism and the moderating role of in-group identification in this mediated relationship.

Details

Journal of Asian Business and Economic Studies, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2515-964X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 July 2012

Jongeun Rhee and Kim K.P. Johnson

The purpose of this paper was to assess how adolescents' favorite apparel brand was related to congruency between brand image and three components of self concept (actual…

3168

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to assess how adolescents' favorite apparel brand was related to congruency between brand image and three components of self concept (actual, ideal, ideal social). Predictors of the brand‐self concept congruency relationships were also examined.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire distributed to 300 high school students yielded usable data from 137 students. Participants' ages ranged from 14 to 18 years.

Findings

The highest level of congruency was found between adolescents' favorite apparel brand and their actual self concept followed by ideal social and ideal self concept. Adolescents who indicated that their apparel purchases were highly influenced by their peers or family members linked their favorite brand with their ideal social or ideal self concept. Materialistic adolescents also linked their favorite apparel brand to their ideal self concept.

Research limitations/implications

Focusing on congruency between brand and self concept is an important strategy in marketing targeting adolescents. Family and peer group influences played an important role in congruency adolescents identified between self and apparel brands.

Originality/value

This research demonstrated application of self‐brand congruency theory to adolescents and to apparel products. Adolescent consumers, like adults, identify a preference for apparel brands that they can link to some aspect of self.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 October 2018

Deepanjana Varshney

The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between social loafing behaviour, self-concept and perceived organisational politics (POP). The impact of POP…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between social loafing behaviour, self-concept and perceived organisational politics (POP). The impact of POP and self-concept upon social loafing behaviour has been the fundamental focus of the paper.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from four companies (n = 262) that combined the responses of subordinates and supervisors. The consequent impact of self-concept factors and POP on social loafing behaviour was analysed through correlations; multiple regressions and mediation were tested using Barren–Kenny and Hayes Bootstrap methods.

Findings

A positively significant connection among self-concept, social loafing and POP has been found in this study. The findings show that POP significantly mediates the relationship between social loafing and self-concept.

Research limitations/implications

This study provides evidence of the positive relationship among POP, social loafing behaviour and self-concept. Such knowledge derived may facilitate the scientific task allocation process, feedback system, team orientation, individual differences and job choice aspects, and thus help in the essential understanding of withdrawal work behaviour and perceived organisational support variables.

Practical implications

Productivity and employee satisfaction are major concerns for all organisations. This research paper provides insight to the organisations and supervisors about individual loafing attitude, self-concept and organisational politics and suggests to overcome their impact and improvement in productivity and employee satisfaction.

Originality/value

This is a pioneer paper in the sense that previously there has been no attempt to determine the relationship between POP and social loafing behaviour. Past research has mostly been conducted in the laboratory settings or classroom contexts. The longitudinal data used in this study remove prior research drawbacks and enlighten the unexplored relationships.

Details

Journal of Indian Business Research, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4195

Keywords

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