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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1994

Yin Cheong Cheng

Aims to develop an organizational model for understanding and managingeffective curriculum change in school. Assumes that curriculum changeand teacher competence…

Abstract

Aims to develop an organizational model for understanding and managing effective curriculum change in school. Assumes that curriculum change and teacher competence development occur in a three‐level context of school organization: the individual level, the group/ programme level, and the whole school level. There exists mutual development and reinforcement between curriculum and teacher competence and also a hierarchy of influence across three levels. Congruence between curriculum change and teacher development and across levels is important for effectiveness of teaching and learning. Congruence represents conceptual consistency and operational consistency, reflecting the strength of school culture. Provides a comprehensive conceptual framework to plan and manage curriculum change and teacher competence development.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1993

Bronston T. Mayes, Dorothy Heide and Ephraim Smith

A survey was mailed to the deans of AACSB accredited schools and 50 per cent of the non‐accredited AACSB affiliates, to determine their perceptions of how the changes in…

Abstract

A survey was mailed to the deans of AACSB accredited schools and 50 per cent of the non‐accredited AACSB affiliates, to determine their perceptions of how the changes in accreditation criteria might affect their curricula and what methods might be used to make these changes. The sample was classified according to the Porter‐McKibbin categories and significant differences were found among these categories for perceived ease of accreditation; changes in programme quality; resource allocation changes; use of mission statements in decision making; curriculum component emphasis, and curriculum evaluation methods. While the overall amount of change expected in the next five years seems modest, the nature of the changes expected could have significant effects on the curricula of US business schools.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Book part
Publication date: 18 July 2008

Jennifer Jellison Holme

This chapter examines organizational and instructional responses of California's high schools to the introduction of a High School Exit Examination through interviews with…

Abstract

This chapter examines organizational and instructional responses of California's high schools to the introduction of a High School Exit Examination through interviews with 47 high school principals across the state. I found that most schools changed little about their organizational structure, and provided little support for students until after they failed the exam. Findings also indicate that the exit exam influenced the curriculum most significantly in low-performing schools and in low-track classes within higher performing schools. While the exit exam spurred some positive changes, it also led to unintended consequences inside classrooms.

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Strong States, Weak Schools: The Benefits and Dilemmas of Centralized Accountability
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84663-910-4

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Book part
Publication date: 7 December 2009

Jan M. Westrick and Shirley J. Miske

Dramatic economic, political, and societal changes at local, national, and global levels, along with commitments to achieve Education for All (EFA) and Millennium…

Abstract

Dramatic economic, political, and societal changes at local, national, and global levels, along with commitments to achieve Education for All (EFA) and Millennium Development Goals (UNESCO, 2000), are prompting national education leaders around the world to restructure and reenvision their education systems (OECD, 2008; Olson, 2008). Decentralization is one of the key structural changes governments are using to promote greater efficiency and to increase local participation in education related to decision making, finances, and accountability in schools. As the Ministry of Education (MOE) of the Sultanate of Oman makes the shift to a decentralized structure, it recognizes that its school administrators require new leadership skills in order to make the necessary changes. Implementing decentralization requires a shift in principals' work and thus their professional identity. “By building the leadership capacity of principals as leaders at the school level, (Oman's) MOE officials hope to strengthen the principals' ability to implement school reforms for the 21st century” (Seward International, Inc., 2008, p. 6).

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Educational Leadership: Global Contexts and International Comparisons
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-645-8

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Abstract

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Accelerating Change in Schools: Leading Rapid, Successful, and Complex Change Initiatives
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-502-7

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Article
Publication date: 4 November 2020

Devora Friedman and Izhak Berkovich

Principals are considered central in initiating and mobilizing changes in schools; however, their political behaviors in the course of school changes are underexplored…

Abstract

Purpose

Principals are considered central in initiating and mobilizing changes in schools; however, their political behaviors in the course of school changes are underexplored. The present research investigated the influence tactics used by school principals to induce teachers to join a process of second-order (deep and wide) change in the school teaching and culture. In specific, the authors were interested to know which influence tactics, principals and staff members considered to be efficient during such a second-order change process.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was based on a case study method focusing on four Israeli Jewish state public religious schools participating in the “Routes” program aimed at strengthening religious values in schools. Data collection included semi-structured interviews with principals, teachers with program coordinators responsibilities and teachers in four schools.

Findings

The results indicate that school principals who are considered successful in leading changes display two key influence prototypes: a hybrid type that combines soft and hard influence tactics and a unitype that relies on soft influence tactics.

Originality/value

The research study contributed to the limited knowledge in educational administration on micropolitics and political behaviors in the course of school changes.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Philip Hallinger and Pornkasem Kantamara

The process of globalization is carrying educational policies across borders to an extent and at a pace never seen before. This has in turn led to a global focus – for the…

Abstract

The process of globalization is carrying educational policies across borders to an extent and at a pace never seen before. This has in turn led to a global focus – for the first time – on the training of school leaders. A key issue in the design and delivery of training and development for school leaders concerns the knowledge base for school leadership. This article presents the results of a research and development project that has sought to understand the cultural basis for educational change in Thai schools. The research found that leading change in Thai schools bears similarities and differences from educational change in the West. This article focuses on the cultural adaptation of a computer‐based simulation for use with Thai school leaders. It describes the methodology employed in the cultural adaptation of the simulation, highlighting successful change strategies grounded in Thai culture.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 39 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2000

Russell F. Waugh

Proposes a new model of teacher receptivity to system‐wide educational change, where the change is planned and implemented in a centrally controlled educational system…

Abstract

Proposes a new model of teacher receptivity to system‐wide educational change, where the change is planned and implemented in a centrally controlled educational system involving teachers in their classrooms. Suggests a measure of teacher receptivity (based on the model) to help administrators plan a change and manage the implementation. Teacher receptivity is proposed to consist of four first‐order aspects, operationally defined by a number of second‐order aspects. These are: characteristics of the change (comparison with the previous system and practicality in my classroom), managing the change at school (alleviation of concerns, learning about the change and participation in decisions at my school), value for the teacher (personal cost appraisal, collaboration with other teachers and opportunities for teacher improvement) and teacher perceived value for students. Teacher receptivity is measured with three aspects for each of the 50 stem‐items and there is an ordered set of response categories relating to these aspects.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1993

Benjamin Levin

Explores the relationship between schools and school systems on theone hand, and, on the other, the world or environment in which they arelocated. The typical presentation…

Abstract

Explores the relationship between schools and school systems on the one hand, and, on the other, the world or environment in which they are located. The typical presentation in the literature stresses the requirement for organizations to adapt to external pressures, and the key role of managers in that process. However, theoretical and empirical work casts doubt on both these assumptions. Raises questions as to what is meant by the environment of an organization, about how organizations come to pay attention to some external pressures rather than others, about the kinds of responses organizations make, and about the role administrators play in the process. Concludes with suggestions for further research in the area.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

Raymond L. Calabrese

School administrators must be forward looking and recognize shifting paradigms in contemporary society. The rapid rate of change in the new millennium influences…

Abstract

School administrators must be forward looking and recognize shifting paradigms in contemporary society. The rapid rate of change in the new millennium influences administrators in the small rural school district as well as the large urban school district. An effective school administrator understands the significance of needed change and consequences of what it means to be a change‐driven school administrator. A starting point for an effective school administrator is to know when it is time to leave one paradigm and embrace a new paradigm shift.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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