Search results

1 – 7 of 7
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 18 December 2019

Victoria Armstrong and Toby Brandon

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the findings from a detailed qualitative PhD study exploring experiences of stigma and discrimination in the lives of people in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the findings from a detailed qualitative PhD study exploring experiences of stigma and discrimination in the lives of people in receipt of “mental health support” at two voluntary sector organisations in the North East of England.

Design/methodology/approach

Empirical material was collected during two periods of three-month long ethnographic periods of fieldwork from July to December of 2013 at two organisations providing support to their members who experience or have experienced mental distress. Along with field notes taken during and after periods of participant observation, the empirical material also included 30 interviews with staff (n=10) and members (n=20) across both organisations, along with a series of three focus groups at each organisation.

Findings

Staff at the organisations did not demonstrate obvious stigmatising or discriminatory attitudes or behaviours. However, they did attribute “self-stigma” to particular attitudes and behaviours of some of the members they support, referring to how they “made excuses”, “did not try” and/or “avoided situations”.

Originality/value

This paper argues that these attributions resulted from the misrecognition of members’ reactions to experiences of discrimination. The empirical material also suggests that these attributions of self-stigma may be indicative of the material limitations of the support environment, the consequent frustrations of well-intentioned staff, and, overall, as symptoms of neoliberalism. Drawing upon a Mad Studies approach and focussing on self-stigma and its attribution in contemporary mental health support, this paper provides a new perspective, which considers how stigma is linked to discrimination by rethinking what is thought of as “self-stigma”.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 28 August 2018

Denise O’Neil Green

In 2015, there were many student protests regarding diversity that made many pay attention to the status of diversity on university campuses. However, well before these…

Abstract

In 2015, there were many student protests regarding diversity that made many pay attention to the status of diversity on university campuses. However, well before these protests occurred there have been diversity officers at the forefront and behind the scenes doing change management work in the equity, diversity, and inclusion arena. While universities are entrenched systems of privilege that are difficult to change fundamentally, there is hope in that this work can and does make a difference for students, faculty, and staff. So, while universities continue to reflect society and its shortcomings, this work does matter.

In this chapter, I share my personal journey as a Chief Diversity Officer for nine years at public universities in North America, drawing upon that experience I share four areas I believe are vital to the success of any diversity effort. Since I have worked in the US and Canada, I bring to this chapter comparisons across borders that highlight the significance of particular practices, challenges of the twenty-first century and pitfalls along the way.

Details

Campus Diversity Triumphs
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-805-5

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 18 April 2018

Aimee Sinclair

The purpose of this paper is to provide insight into the sanist microaggressions that peer workers face working in mental health and proposes ways in which peer workers…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide insight into the sanist microaggressions that peer workers face working in mental health and proposes ways in which peer workers and institutions may begin to challenge sanist practices within the sector.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is written as a personal narrative. It explores a “moment” in the life of the author as a peer support worker.

Findings

Peer workers are often faced with sanist microaggressions on the job which can significantly affect peer workers’ capacity over time. Sharing our stories, identifying points of resistance and working collectively to challenge microaggressions are important to peer worker survival within the mental health system. Organisations that train or employ peer workers should be aware of sanist microaggressions and learn how to strategically respond to them.

Originality/value

The paper documents the experiences of the author. There is limited academic literature documenting peer worker experience of microaggressions.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 28 August 2018

Abstract

Details

Campus Diversity Triumphs
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-805-5

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 December 2017

Mark Cresswell

The purpose of this paper is to critique Spandler and McKeown’s recent advocacy of a truth and reconciliation (T&R) process in psychiatry.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to critique Spandler and McKeown’s recent advocacy of a truth and reconciliation (T&R) process in psychiatry.

Design/methodology/approach

A critique of a recent paper in Mental Health Review Journal.

Findings

That Spandler and McKeown’s advocacy of a T&R process in psychiatry can be criticised from a number of inter-related practical, political and ethical perspectives.

Originality/value

The present critique contributes to the ongoing debate about the desirability of a T&R process in psychiatry.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 23 February 2001

Abstract

Details

Postmodern Malpractice: A Medical Case Study in The Culture War
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-091-3

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 June 2014

Colleen M. Berryessa

The purpose of this paper is to explore how judges perceive High Functioning Autistic Spectrum Disorders (hfASDs) and the disorders’ effects on an offender's ability to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how judges perceive High Functioning Autistic Spectrum Disorders (hfASDs) and the disorders’ effects on an offender's ability to formulate criminal intent and control behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews on topics related to offenders with hfASDs were conducted with 21 California Superior Court Judges. A coding scheme was developed and an iterative qualitative coding process was used for analysis.

Findings

Analysis yielded three major themes on how an hfASD diagnosis affects an offender's ability to regulate actions and criminal behaviour. Interviewed judges reported beliefs that hfASD offenders view the world in a different way and that much of their behaviour is not under their direct control. Judges reported these perceptions likely affect how they criminally process and make legal decisions regarding offenders with hfASDs.

Research limitations/implications

The sample size was small and therefore no statistical significance can be drawn from results; findings cannot be applied to perceptions or experiences of the entire California Superior Court Judge population.

Originality/value

Past academic research reports that individuals with hfASDs that offend often do so because of specific symptoms associated with the disorder. This presents a complex dilemma for the criminal justice system regarding how best to understand the disorder and process these offenders. This study and its findings aim to shed light on issues judges encounter in determining these offenders’ responsibility and sentencing, in what ways this information might be integrated into judicial decision making, and areas where future research is needed.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8824

Keywords

1 – 7 of 7