Search results

1 – 10 of over 21000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 29 July 2014

Gitte Engelund, Ulla Møller Hansen and Ingrid Willaing

The purpose of this paper is to explore educator competencies and roles needed to perform participatory patient education, and develop a comprehensive model describing this.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore educator competencies and roles needed to perform participatory patient education, and develop a comprehensive model describing this.

Design/methodology/approach

Data collection in the qualitative study proceeded through two phases. In the first phase, 28 educators were involved in exploring educator competencies needed to perform participatory, group-based patient education. The paper used qualitative methods: dialogue workshops, interviews and observations. In the second phase, 310 educators were involved in saturating and validating the insights from phase one using workshop techniques such as brainstorming, reflection exercises and the story-dialogue method. A grounded theory approach was used to analyse data.

Findings

A model called “The Health Education Juggler” was developed comprising four educator roles necessary to perform participatory patient education: the Embracer, the Facilitator, the Translator and the Initiator. The validity of the model was confirmed in phase two by educators and showed fit, grab, relevance, workability and modifiability.

Practical implications

The model provides a tool that can be used to support the focus on “juggling” skills in educators: the switching between different educator roles when performing participatory, group-based patient education. The model is useful as an analytical tool for reflection and supervision, as well as for observation and evaluation of participatory, group-based patient education.

Originality/value

The study proposes a comprehensive model consisting of four equally important roles for educators performing participatory, group-based patient education.

Details

Health Education, vol. 114 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 28 January 2014

Tue Helms Andersen, Nana Folmann Hempler and Ingrid Willaing

The purpose of this paper is to explore educators’ experiences of putting a participatory and patient-centered education model, “The Health Education Juggler,” into…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore educators’ experiences of putting a participatory and patient-centered education model, “The Health Education Juggler,” into practice after having attended a one-day seminar. The model consists of four educator roles in participatory group-based patient education in chronic illness: embracer (takes care of the group), facilitator (generates dialogue and participation), translator (communicates professional knowledge) and initiator (motivates action in patients).

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative analysis of observations of eight group-based patient education sessions and seven in-depth semi-structured interviews with 11 educators.

Findings

Educators find it difficult to include disease-specific knowledge when working with a flexible patient-centered approach. They tend to stay in the role they find most comfortable during education sessions (most often that of embracer), rather than adopting new and more challenging roles in the teaching process. Educators theoretically understand the role of facilitator, but they do not know how to perform in this role in practice. The ability to juggle all educator roles depends on the ability to master each.

Practical implications

The Health Education Juggler model shows promise in promoting participation and patient-centeredness and as a reflection tool for educators and an analytic tool for quality assessment of patient education. These findings support further development of model use.

Originality/value

This model of educator roles in group-based patient education in chronic illness provides a new approach to patient education. It indicates the need for various professional competencies among educators to provide patient-centered education in a flexible way, with a strong focus on patient-identified problems and challenges, social learning processes and generation of internal motivation in patients.

Details

Health Education, vol. 114 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 5 June 2011

Kelli Steverson Ragle

The purpose of this nonexperimental research was to examine the perceptions of state-certified teachers regarding Library Media Specialists (LMS). Through collaboration…

Abstract

The purpose of this nonexperimental research was to examine the perceptions of state-certified teachers regarding Library Media Specialists (LMS). Through collaboration and the use of social constructivist learning theories, teachers at three high schools in Georgia were interviewed regarding the roles and responsibilities of LMS. The primary research question asked how the perceptions of teachers on the practices of the role of the school LMS differ from the way the teachers perceive these roles to be important at their high schools. The secondary research questions addressed the correlations between high school teachers' demographic information and both the importance of and the practice of the roles of the high school LMS. Quantitative data were collected through a survey developed by McCracken (2000). A paired sample t-test was used to compare the theoretical and practical scales in each category of the LMS roles, and a Spearman rank-ordered correlations test was used to compare the 13 descriptive variables to theoretical and practical scales. Teacher participants reported each of the roles of the LMS to be more important than what is actually being practiced in their school settings and that similar views existed on both the practice scale and the importance scale. Implications include community and educator awareness of the role of the school LMS, an increased educator awareness of the roles of a state-certified school LMS to compliment the high school curriculum, and an increased awareness for the need of a LMS in public schools.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 19 March 2020

Birgitte Wraae and Andreas Walmsley

Explores the role of the entrepreneurship educator and their place in the entrepreneurship education landscape.

Abstract

Purpose

Explores the role of the entrepreneurship educator and their place in the entrepreneurship education landscape.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses an adapted version of Jones and Matlay's (2011) conceptual framework that describes the context of entrepreneurship education to explore the entrepreneurship educator's role. In-depth interviews were conducted with eleven entrepreneurship educators from five universities/university colleges in Denmark.

Findings

Illustrates the situated nature of entrepreneurship education. The entrepreneurship educator is embedded in a system of dialogic relationships with a range of stakeholders. This paper provides insights into how the entrepreneurship educator navigates these relationships and the influence these relationships have in determining the scope and nature of the entrepreneurship educator's role.

Research limitations/implications

Provides a framework and findings upon which further studies can build in an area that has hitherto received limited attention. Findings could be compared with those in other geographical contexts, for example. The dialogic relationships themselves could be explored either holistically or individually with other stakeholders (e.g. students, institutions, communities).

Originality/value

Research on the role of the entrepreneurship educator is extremely limited in an area that has otherwise seen a proliferation of research. The adaptation and application of Jones and Matlay's (2011) framework provides a novel way of understanding how this role is shaped. Where most studies focus either on course content or the students, this study proposes another way to gain insight into the complex world of delivering entrepreneurship education.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 62 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 October 2020

Robin Bell and Heather Bell

Experiential approaches have become increasingly common in entrepreneurship education in response to calls for different approaches to the traditional didactic…

Abstract

Purpose

Experiential approaches have become increasingly common in entrepreneurship education in response to calls for different approaches to the traditional didactic process-driven approach. Experiential approaches offer the potential to develop the skills and mindset that are required in entrepreneurship. Research has highlighted the critical importance of educator pedagogical competence in the delivery and quality of teaching and learning in further and higher education. Nevertheless, educator narratives and practices are often based on foundations that suggest a lack in the depth of knowledge and understanding of the underlying pedagogic learning theories and practice. This paper brings educational theory and pedagogic practice together in a three-stage framework of the experiential entrepreneurship learning process to support entrepreneurship educators within further and higher education.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews and brings together the seminal educational theories and philosophies of constructivism, objectivism, Kolb's (1984) theory of experiential learning, Schön's (1983) reflection-in-action and Mezirow's (1997) theory of transformative learning, to develop a framework which underpins the experiential entrepreneurship learning process.

Findings

This paper develops a three-stage framework which informs the roles of an educator and a learner in experiential entrepreneurship education within further and higher education, based on educational theories and philosophies that inform the learning process.

Practical implications

The developed framework supports the pedagogic competence of educators in the delivery of experiential entrepreneurship education through a deeper understanding of the supporting theory that informs the pedagogic practice. This will provide consolidation to enable educators to maximise the effectiveness of their educational practice (Kaynardağ, 2019) and can increase the legitimacy of entrepreneurship education (Foliard et al., 2018).

Originality/value

This paper meets calls in the literature to provide a closer engagement between educational theory and pedagogic practice to afford guidance as to how educators can navigate some of the different educational theories and philosophies to consolidate the effective delivery of quality experiential entrepreneurship education. Applying seminal educational theories and philosophies to ensure the quality of experiential education can support the legitimacy of experiential entrepreneurship education.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2006

Paul D. Hannon

This paper aims to explore the philosophical and conceptual understanding of entrepreneurship education through borrowing and applying conceptualisations of education from…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the philosophical and conceptual understanding of entrepreneurship education through borrowing and applying conceptualisations of education from education theory to bring deeper meaning to approaches to entrepreneurship education in UK higher education institutions (HEIs).

Design/methodology/approach

This paper identifies existing theoretical and conceptual frameworks from adult education and applies these to the phenomenon of entrepreneurship education as a sense‐making tool from which deeper insights and understanding are gained.

Findings

As a conceptual paper the “findings” relate to the unearthing of the inherent drivers and values to the design and delivery of entrepreneurship education in UK HEIs. Applying education theoretical frameworks enables presentation of a purposeful and guiding framework for effective curricula design in entrepreneurship thereby enabling coherence and cohesion of approach and achievable outcomes. Furthermore, the paper maps the purpose and role of educators against a segmented framework to draw out distinctions across contexts and to present the need for a clarification of the role of the educator in the entrepreneurial learning process. This enables a discussion of the development needs of entrepreneurship educators for the UK.

Practical implications

Overall, the paper presents implications for HEIs in how they conceive of and introduce entrepreneurship education; educators and the role they perform in effective entrepreneurship education and curricula designers in developing meaningful “fit for purpose” offerings across the diversity of the entrepreneurial opportunity environment.

Originality/value

This paper further builds on a significant gap in the extant knowledge and literature for enhancing understanding in the development of the field of entrepreneurship education within higher education in the UK.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 48 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 16 December 2019

Aaron Kessler, Melissa Boston and Mary Kay Stein

This study explores the teacher’s role for implementing a cognitive tutor (CT) intended to increase students’ knowledge of proportional reasoning and potential impacts on…

Abstract

Purpose

This study explores the teacher’s role for implementing a cognitive tutor (CT) intended to increase students’ knowledge of proportional reasoning and potential impacts on students’ learning.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a mixed methods approach to design-based research, the authors examine results from three different phases of the CT implementation using frameworks from mathematics education research.

Findings

Based on observations of 10 educators, the authors identify 4 different types of interactions among the CT, students and educators. Using observations and student assessment results (n = 134), the authors begin to build an argument that different types of interactions have the potential to impact students’ opportunities to learn in computer-directed learning environments.

Originality/value

The authors conclude that research on the efficacy of computer-directed learning environments should consider differences in implementation of CT materials and that the types of CT, student and educator interactions described herein provide a framework to support such exploration.

Details

Information and Learning Sciences, vol. 121 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5348

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 October 2018

Robin Bell and Peng Liu

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the perceived challenges that Chinese vocational college educators face in developing and delivering constructivist active and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the perceived challenges that Chinese vocational college educators face in developing and delivering constructivist active and experiential entrepreneurship education.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative data were collected from 24 focus groups of educators who had been tasked with embedding constructivist entrepreneurship education into their teaching and curriculum, at four different vocational colleges situated in four different provinces in China. The data were coded and analysed for emerging themes using a process of bottom-up thematic analysis.

Findings

A range of concerns were identified from the focus groups and these could be divided into five main challenges, which were the role of the educator in the constructivist learning process and their ability to control the process; the educators perceived student reaction to the process and their engagement with it; the time and technology required to deliver the process; the link between the learning and industry; and the educators’ perception of the requirements to meet internal expectations.

Research limitations/implications

This research explores the educators’ perceptions of the challenges they face in developing and delivering active and experiential constructivist entrepreneurship education. Whilst these concerns may impact how the educators’ approach the task, these concerns are only perceived, as the educators’ have not yet implemented the introduction of constructivist entrepreneurship education when other challenges may become evident.

Originality/value

Encouragement by the Chinese Government to develop and deliver constructivist active and experiential entrepreneurship education has resulted in a number of tensions and challenges. Entrepreneurship education in China is still relatively young and under researched and this research contributes to the literature by exploring the challenges that educators face in developing and delivering constructivist entrepreneurship education in Chinese vocational colleges.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 September 2018

Gideon Petrus van Tonder and Elsa Fourie

The purpose of this paper is to explore the possible use of internships to support educators with the increase in their administrative, professional workload.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the possible use of internships to support educators with the increase in their administrative, professional workload.

Design/methodology/approach

This research utilised a mixed method approach. Quantitative and qualitative data was gathered. Pragmatism was the research paradigm. Two structured Likert scale questionnaires were used. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with purposefully selected in-service educators from schools.

Findings

The participants in this study indicated that the increase in their administrative workload impacted negatively on their well-being, they were overwhelmed by the amount of documentation they had to compile, they indicated that assessment was difficult, that they did not have time to constantly adapt to changes, that they had limited opportunities for professional development. Educators said they suffered from anxiety, had high stress levels, were moody, physically and emotionally exhausted and considered to leave the profession.

Practical implications

The implementation of an internship model could impact positively on educators’ administrative workload. It could lead to a decrease in educators’ administrative workload; lower stress levels and increased learner performance. Student educators will have opportunities to experience how a school operates, get feedback on their teaching skills, learn to discipline learners, attend meetings and serve as part of an educational team.

Originality/value

In the light of the findings of this research it seems that the implementation of an internship model would provide opportunities to expose student educators to a real-life work experience and opportunities to work together with experienced educators acting as mentors.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 32 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 22 February 2013

Rachel Kulick

Purpose – This paper explores how the interactive dynamics of peer education models within independent youth media outlets facilitate and impede youth engagement in media…

Abstract

Purpose – This paper explores how the interactive dynamics of peer education models within independent youth media outlets facilitate and impede youth engagement in media activism and social change work, more broadly defined.Design/methodological approach – Ethnographic and participatory action research methods are used with the youth media hub, Youth Media Action (YMA), to examine the possibilities and challenges that peer media educators confront in cultivating a noncommercial space for the collective production of oppositional media. YMA specifically seeks to involve youth from marginalized communities.Findings – The results suggest that peer-to-peer education models do act as vehicles for political engagement as youth experience shared ownership, cultivate solidarity, and acquire community organizing skills through the collective production of oppositional media. At the same time, challenges can surface when peer educators juggle multiple roles and participating community youth groups espouse differing organizational values and pedagogical sensibilities.Research limitations/implications – This study offers a potential pathway for further research on how peer education and collective media making models influence youth citizenship and social change work.Originality/value – The focus on the organizational and social dynamics of peer education models is useful in understanding youth citizenship and digital access as a collective experience for youth living in disenfranchised communities that seek out these spaces for not only media making but also community building.

Details

Youth Engagement: The Civic-Political Lives of Children and Youth
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-544-9

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 21000