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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

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Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 9 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Book part
Publication date: 1 December 2014

Hafdís Ingvarsdóttir

This chapter focuses on the importance of reflection for teacher growth. Through two case studies, life examples are given on the significance of embedding critical…

Abstract

This chapter focuses on the importance of reflection for teacher growth. Through two case studies, life examples are given on the significance of embedding critical reflection already in initial teacher education. Teachers’ life stories were collected through in-depth “rivers of life” interviews. The interplay between teachers’ awareness of their life story and their subjective theories, and how this impacts on the teachers’ attitude and openness to change are illustrated. The findings indicate that reflecting on one’s life stories may play an important role in forming teachers’ beliefs and pedagogical practices and hence their attitudes to change. The findings also suggest that a culture fostering close reflective collaboration and collegial support plays an important part in developing teachers’ perspectives of their roles and that of their learners. The findings reveal that presuming a single work culture in a school may be an oversimplification as several subcultures may be at play in one institution and even within the same subject area. The findings should have implications for approaches and procedures in teacher education and for the induction of novice teachers. Although the case studies reported here are based on Icelandic data, they should offer insights and have relevance for teacher education and teacher growth not only in Iceland but also in other countries as well.

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International Teacher Education: Promising Pedagogies (Part A)
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-136-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1979

“All things are in a constant state of change”, said Heraclitus of Ephesus. The waters if a river are for ever changing yet the river endures. Every particle of matter is…

Abstract

“All things are in a constant state of change”, said Heraclitus of Ephesus. The waters if a river are for ever changing yet the river endures. Every particle of matter is in continual movement. All death is birth in a new form, all birth the death of the previous form. The seasons come and go. The myth of our own John Barleycorn, buried in the ground, yet resurrected in the Spring, has close parallels with the fertility rites of Greece and the Near East such as those of Hyacinthas, Hylas, Adonis and Dionysus, of Osiris the Egyptian deity, and Mondamin the Red Indian maize‐god. Indeed, the ritual and myth of Attis, born of a virgin, killed and resurrected on the third day, undoubtedly had a strong influence on Christianity.

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Management Decision, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

Sadia Nadeem and Chris Hendry

This paper focuses on the possibilities of the long‐term development of flexible working as a work‐life policy, through understanding the power dynamics between the…

Abstract

This paper focuses on the possibilities of the long‐term development of flexible working as a work‐life policy, through understanding the power dynamics between the individual and the organisation. The study presents a framework which summarises the factors influencing the employee‐employer power dynamics, and leads us to the research questions. The methodology involves triangulation in case studies in two organisations based on surveys of representative samples in each organisation (n = 243 and n = 128) and interviews with the management. Findings support the long‐term development of employee‐friendly flexible working. There is a strong desire, and a lack of polarisation of attitudes, among employees for greater flexibility. Certain employee groups with stronger negotiating power have initiated the work‐life debate, but in doing so, they have increased the power of all employees through lowering ideological barriers, and creating knowledge of new possibilities and aspirations. Favourable external pressures and changing business needs also improve the position of employees.

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Women in Management Review, vol. 18 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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Book part
Publication date: 12 December 2003

Daryl Koehn

Noting the recent wave of books on business and spirituality, the editor of a business journal recently sardonically observed that there must be more Zen in American…

Abstract

Noting the recent wave of books on business and spirituality, the editor of a business journal recently sardonically observed that there must be more Zen in American boardrooms than in Buddhist monasteries. While the spirituality of business may be withering, the business of spirituality appears only too alive. Elmer Gantry has left the revivalist tents and entered the convention hall circuit of motivational speakers and corporate awards banquets.

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Spiritual Intelligence at Work: Meaning, Metaphor, and Morals
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-067-8

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2009

Nicola R. Wheen

The purpose of this paper is to examine how, why and to what effect pounamu (New Zealand greenstone) came to be owned and managed by Ngai Tahu as part of a Treaty of

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how, why and to what effect pounamu (New Zealand greenstone) came to be owned and managed by Ngai Tahu as part of a Treaty of Waitangi settlement.

Design/methodology/approach

The value of pounamu to the Maori iwi Ngai Tahu, and the strategic importance and legislative mechanism of its vesting in Ngai Tahu are described. The current legal arrangements for pounamu are compared with those for other minerals and natural resources affected by Treaty of Waitangi settlements. The legally controversial issues of mandate, entitlement and enforcement that have arisen since the vesting are traversed.

Findings

The return of pounamu was critical in settling Ngai Tahu's Treaty claims. Other natural resources have also been subject to Treaty claims, and some have been restored in whole or in part to Maori control. Pounamu is now owned and controlled by Ngai Tahu. Customary uses of pounamu are allowed, as potentially is mining that is supported by research. Current research aims to determine extraction rates for sustainable use, based on a definition of the resource as pounamu that is available for surface discovery and collection. The process of vesting pounamu in the legal entity established to represent Ngai Tahu was controversial, and complex disputes about customary rights and pounamu source(s) have dominated criminal proceedings undertaken to protect Ngai Tahu interests in pounamu.

Originality/value

The story of pounamu provides an interesting example of a developing feature of resource management law and practice in New Zealand: resources that are owned and/or managed under a set of legal arrangements designed within the terms of settlement for a claim under the Treaty of Waitangi.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 20 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1996

Sandy Cotter

Summarizes the basic principles of Bioenergetics along with its origin in Riechian psychology. Clarifies that Bioenergetics is used at Cranfield not as psychotherapy, but…

Abstract

Summarizes the basic principles of Bioenergetics along with its origin in Riechian psychology. Clarifies that Bioenergetics is used at Cranfield not as psychotherapy, but as an aid to personal development for a specific population of high‐functioning individuals, i.e. managers. Places the Bioenergetic body‐mind notion into a philosophical context of human goodness and potential; thus expanding the focus to body‐mind‐spirit. Examines five body‐mind types through the following aspects: how they operate at work; how they were formed; key attitudes; unique gifts; body shape; development path; how they are best managed. Case histories illustrating the different types in various modes of consultant intervention, i.e. individual development, team building and culture change.

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Journal of Management Development, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 6 September 2019

Louis Rice

The purpose of this paper is to examine how nature-based solutions (NBS) are being used in city areas to improve environmental conditions and increase tourism. This…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how nature-based solutions (NBS) are being used in city areas to improve environmental conditions and increase tourism. This research examines the drivers behind, and impacts of, the application of NBS in city redevelopment projects for tourism. NBS is a term that refers to the use of flora and fauna ecosystems as an approach to resolve problems faced by society.

Design/methodology/approach

An interdisciplinary research methodology has been developed to examine the relationship between city NBS and tourism; the methods include a literature review of contemporary practice, field observations and thematic textual analysis from digital archives. The research methodology uses a combined empirical and desk-based analysis of five case studies cites.

Findings

NBS, as part of city redevelopment projects, is now a strategic aim of many cities globally to re-brand, re-vision and re-orientate themselves to be more hospitable, liveable and attractive to tourists and visitors.

Practical implications

City redevelopment projects are incorporating NBS to address climate change as well as local environmental issues such as disaster resilience whilst simultaneously delivering social and economic benefits.

Social implications

The research reveals that NBS can deliver benefits to human wellbeing, tourism, economic vitality as well as more sustainable models of urban development.

Originality/value

The research reveals for the first time how NBS is being used as a driver for increasing tourism globally. The research is highly original as it examines a new topic in tourism studies, the role of NBS in relation to city tourism.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1998

Paul Thompson and Ian Tod

The inhabitants of the active floodplain of Bangladesh’s main rivers receive little government support to help them cope with floods and have developed their own…

Abstract

The inhabitants of the active floodplain of Bangladesh’s main rivers receive little government support to help them cope with floods and have developed their own strategies. Major flood projection works are not possible in these areas where floods and erosion annually affect many vulnerable people. Surveys of the impact of severe floods found that total losses and the dislocation to their lives is substantial. These loss data were used to assess the financial viability of small scale floodproofing measures, such as house raising and flood shelters, which are the preferences of these people. Such measures give better rates of return than embankment projects in mainland areas, provided that the location is not affected by erosion for four to eight years. A combination of resources, technical assistance and local hazard assessment is needed, and a government commitment to improve the living conditions of the inhabitants of the active floodplains.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1997

Frédéric Jallat and Lalit M. Johri

Based on analysis of six companies, three each from India and US, it is found that companies using cultural values as anchors for acquiring and building competitive…

Abstract

Based on analysis of six companies, three each from India and US, it is found that companies using cultural values as anchors for acquiring and building competitive capabilites have outsmarted other companies that followed only conventional routes such as product and process innovations, operating efficiencies, responsiveness to consumers and quality of products and services to build competitive advantage. These six case companies have leveraged their performance by focusing on traditional as well as newly emerging cultural values and practices at the level of an individual, family and professional group. Culture often means “corporate values” in the United States whereas it means “social and sociological values” in India. The cultural management perspective is indeed much broader in India, where Indian managers often refer to a very old history and national culture, to multicentury values and traditions, whereas American managers develop strategies mainly based on emerging values and fashions.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

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