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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2021

Jeeta Sarkar, Lalatendu Kesari Jena and Kalpana Sahoo

This paper aims to investigate the impact of total rewards on retention. The finding relies on need satisfaction approach as a mechanism. This is done by investigating the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the impact of total rewards on retention. The finding relies on need satisfaction approach as a mechanism. This is done by investigating the role of need satisfaction of “autonomy, competence and relatedness” as possible mediators between elements of total rewards and retention.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper focussed on exploring the literature published in various popular databases .Based on the conceptual analysis, a set of possible frameworks linking the three constructs has been stated for future research.

Findings

The research has evolved with few possible frameworks to model the assertions by investigating and corroborating it with quantitative studies to be empirically tested.

Originality/value

The originality lies in applying self-determination theory framework of need satisfaction mechanism in explaining the relationships between total rewards and retention, thereby adding new insights to the employee retention literature.

Details

Vilakshan - XIMB Journal of Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0973-1954

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Article
Publication date: 8 October 2021

Ahmad Usman Shahid, Hafiza Sobia Tufail, Jawad Shahid and Aimen Ismail

The purpose of this study is to develop and empirically test a theoretical model of antecedents and consequences of perceived job security of professional accountants…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to develop and empirically test a theoretical model of antecedents and consequences of perceived job security of professional accountants. This study contributes to the literature by examining the mediating role of perceived job security between the reward management system and the ethical job performance of professional accountants.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was used to collect responses from professional accountants at small- and medium-tier accounting firms in Pakistan. Of the total 313 circulated research instruments, 270 were completed producing a response rate of 86%. The hypotheses were tested by performing structural equation modeling, confirmatory factor analysis and correlation using SPSS 24 and AMOS 25.

Findings

Findings specify that the perceived job security of professional accountants partially and fully mediates the relationship between their ethical job performance and intrinsic and rewards, respectively. Additionally, reward management systems including intrinsic and extrinsic rewards have a significant impact on the ethical job performance of professional accountants.

Practical implications

The findings of this study may have significant implications for researchers for examining the subjects' perceived job security in enhancing the overall performance of the firms. The findings may also benefit domestic and international accounting firms for recognizing the importance of rewards and job security for enhancing the ethical performance of accountants.

Originality/value

This study is the first to provide empirical evidence for the importance of perceived job security for professional accountants in Pakistan. The current research also provides sharper insights into establishing the direct impact of both extrinsic and intrinsic rewards on professional accountants' ethical job performance.

Details

Asian Review of Accounting, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1321-7348

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Article
Publication date: 13 September 2021

Zhenyuan Wang, Jianghong Du, Herman H.M. Tse, Jun Gu, Hui Meng and Qiuwen Zhao

This study aims to explore the relative importance of the subdimensions of total rewards satisfaction in predicting research and development (R&D) employee creativity. In…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the relative importance of the subdimensions of total rewards satisfaction in predicting research and development (R&D) employee creativity. In addition, the study examines the indirect effects of the subdimensions of total rewards satisfaction on creativity via work engagement and the moderating role of challenge-related work stress in the first stage.

Design/methodology/approach

A two-wave design was used, in which total rewards satisfaction and challenge-related work stress were measured in the first wave. Work engagement and creativity were measured in the second wave. Dominance analysis and the latent moderated mediation model were used for the data analyses.

Findings

The analyses show that nonfinancial rewards satisfaction completely dominates indirect and direct financial rewards satisfaction when predicting creativity. Indirect financial rewards satisfaction completely dominates direct financial rewards satisfaction when predicting creativity. Work engagement mediates the relationships between the subdimensions of total rewards satisfaction and creativity. Challenge-related work stress moderates the relationships between the subdimensions of total rewards satisfaction and work engagement and the indirect effects of the subdimensions of total rewards satisfaction on creativity via work engagement.

Practical implications

The results imply that managers should set challenge demands for R&D employees and try to improve their total rewards satisfaction, especially their nonfinancial and indirect financial rewards satisfaction, for them to be more creative.

Originality/value

This empirical study contributes to the literature by comparing the relative importance of the different dimensions of total rewards satisfaction in predicting creativity. The study also clarifies how (through work engagement) and when (based on challenge-related work stress) the subdimensions of total rewards satisfaction are positively related to R&D employees' creativity.

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2021

Qiuping Peng, Xi Zhong, Shanshi Liu, Huaikang Zhou and Nannan Ke

In this paper, the moderating roles of leader reward omission and person–supervisor fit in the relationship between job autonomy and knowledge hiding are investigated.

Abstract

Purpose

In this paper, the moderating roles of leader reward omission and person–supervisor fit in the relationship between job autonomy and knowledge hiding are investigated.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a sample of 248 employees in a two-wave survey, we performed a hierarchical regression analysis to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The results revealed that employees with high job autonomy were less likely to engage in knowledge hiding. Moreover, when employees experienced leader reward omission, the negative relationship between job autonomy and knowledge hiding was weakened, and this interesting effect varied by person–supervisor fit.

Research limitations/implications

This study does not explore the mediating mechanism by which job autonomy affects employee knowledge hiding. Moreover, as this research was conducted in a Chinese context, the generalizability of our findings is unclear.

Practical implications

This research has fulfilled its practical aims by providing advice on knowledge-relevant job characteristic factors that can be used to stage interventions regarding the provision of autonomy in jobs, and by carefully considering how to create interdependence between jobs without pushing people to engage in knowledge-hiding behaviors. Furthermore, it is important for leaders to help employees identify work goals and directions and not engage in reward omission.

Originality/value

This study contributes to theoretical advancements in the field of knowledge hiding by revealing boundary conditions that mitigate or enhance the impact of job autonomy on knowledge hiding.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 23 September 2021

Samuel T. Opoku, Bettye A. Apenteng and Kwabena G. Boakye

This paper aims to explore the mediating effect of organizational support for innovation and moderating impact of supervisory support on how rewards shape employee…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the mediating effect of organizational support for innovation and moderating impact of supervisory support on how rewards shape employee creativity among rural healthcare employees, a group with few resources and considerable expectations.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a regression-based moderated path analysis, the authors tested the hypotheses with healthcare employee survey data from a large Southern rural hospital in the USA.

Findings

The empirical results suggest organizational support for innovation mediates the influence of rewards on employee creativity. In addition, the indirect effect of rewards on employee creativity via organizational support for innovation is moderated by supervisory support, such that the indirect effect is more pronounced at high levels of supervisory support than at low levels of supervisory support.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the organizational support and creativity literature by exploring the indirect relations of rewards on employee creativity through organizational support for innovation, and the moderating role of supervisory support in such relations.

Details

International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-669X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 August 2021

Brian Knox

Managerial accounting education generally insists that managers should never consider sunk costs. This suggestion seems inconsistent with a common mode of thinking about…

Abstract

Purpose

Managerial accounting education generally insists that managers should never consider sunk costs. This suggestion seems inconsistent with a common mode of thinking about future rewards: quasi-hyperbolic discounting. This paper aims to explore the conflict between sunk cost consideration and quasi-hyperbolic discounting and to illustrate when sunk cost consideration may be appropriate.

Design/methodology/approach

The author conducted three numerical experiments, i.e. simulated experiments based on analytical models, to demonstrate how it can be beneficial to consider sunk costs in some circumstances. All three numerical experiments assume quasi-hyperbolic discounting. First, the author tested considering sunk costs with future rewards that are certain. Second, the author tested considering sunk costs with uncertain future rewards. Finally, the author tested two different educational interventions to change decision-makers’ thought patterns.

Findings

The author found that considering sunk costs worsens decisions when there is bad news and improves them when there is good news. The author found that an educational intervention that partially dissuades managers from considering sunk costs improves decisions when bad news arrives and worsens them when good news arrives. The author also found that an educational intervention that reduces uncertainty improves decisions when bad news arrives and does not worsen these decisions when good news arrives.

Originality/value

The author provided numerical examples of situations in which considering sunk costs is valuable. The findings on educational interventions provide information about the tradeoffs of teaching that sunk costs should never be considered.

Details

Pacific Accounting Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0114-0582

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2021

Carole Serhan, Wissam Salloum and Nader Abdo

The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of reward systems on team performance and analyze how satisfaction with rewards can result in better working…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of reward systems on team performance and analyze how satisfaction with rewards can result in better working performance and cohesiveness in the job environment.

Design/methodology/approach

Data was collected from 32 single members of different teams working in 10 selected banks from the Middle East and North Africa region.

Findings

The analysis from empirical findings reveals that there is a positive link between reward systems and team performance. More particularly, profit sharing has positive effects on team performance and collective bargaining reward systems affect significantly team cohesiveness. These links create an opportunity for employers to use reward systems as a motivating factor to direct team behavior toward more employee retention.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the teamwork performance research stream by empirically studying how rewards improve team performance and cohesiveness in Eastern contexts. Studies in such contexts are relatively rare.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 27 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2021

Rima Khatib and Henri Barki

To help reduce the increasing number of information security breaches that are caused by insiders, past research has examined employee non-compliance with information…

Abstract

Purpose

To help reduce the increasing number of information security breaches that are caused by insiders, past research has examined employee non-compliance with information security policy. However, existent studies have observed mixed results, which suggest that an interaction is likely to exist among the variables that explain employee non-compliance. In an effort to provide evidence for this possibility, this paper aims to better explain why employees routinely engage in non-compliant behaviors by examining the direct and interactive effects of employees’ perceived costs and rewards of compliance and non-compliance on their routinized non-compliant behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on rational choice theory, this study used 16 hypothetical scenarios in an experimental survey, collecting data from 326 respondents and analyzing them via structural equation modeling and a four-way factorial experiment.

Findings

The results suggest that routinized non-compliance of employees is more strongly influenced by the rewards than the costs they perceive in their non-compliance. Further, employees’ routinized non-compliance behavior was found to be positively influenced by an interactive effect of perceived rewards of compliance when their perceptions of their non-compliance costs and rewards were both high and low.

Originality/value

This paper’s key contribution is to suggest that non-compliance behavior is influenced by direct and interactive effects of perceived rewards of compliance and non-compliance.

Details

Information & Computer Security, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4961

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 July 2021

Pınar Başgöze, Yaprak Atay, Selin Metin Camgöz and Lydia Hanks

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the impact of reward structure on the customer's value perception of the program, loyalty to the program and loyalty to the firm.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the impact of reward structure on the customer's value perception of the program, loyalty to the program and loyalty to the firm.

Design/methodology/approach

A 2 (type of reward) x 2 (timing of redemption) between subjects experimental design was conducted. In addition, the indirect effect of the customer's value perception of the program on loyalty to the firm via loyalty to the program is tested with Hayes and Preacher's mediation procedure.

Findings

Study results indicated that type of reward has a positive impact on the perceived value of a loyalty program. Program loyalty mediates the relationship between the perceived value of the loyalty program and customer loyalty, as well as the relationship between type of reward and customer loyalty.

Originality/value

The findings of this study demonstrate the importance of the type and timing of loyalty program rewards on customer perceptions of the value of the loyalty program. In addition, this study is a step forward in providing a deep understanding of the impact of such perceptions on loyalty. These findings fill a number of research gaps and provide tangible guidance for practitioners.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1989

Alan J. Dubinsky and Thomas N. Ingram

Given the limited empirical work investigating personalcharacteristics of industrial sales people as related to their rewardvalences and the limitation of measuring…

Abstract

Given the limited empirical work investigating personal characteristics of industrial sales people as related to their reward valences and the limitation of measuring valences at a single level, previous research is extended by examining the relationships between industrial sales people′s personal characteristics and their valences for multiple levels of various rewards. A conceptual framework is presented, previous studies reviewed, hypotheses offered, the methodology explained, and the results and implications of the study discussed.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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