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Book part
Publication date: 10 November 2014

Alan L. Gustman and Thomas L. Steinmeier

This paper advances the specification and estimation of econometric models of retirement and saving in two earner families. The complications introduced by the interaction…

Abstract

This paper advances the specification and estimation of econometric models of retirement and saving in two earner families. The complications introduced by the interaction of retirement decisions by husbands and wives have led researchers to adopt a number of simplifications. Our analysis relaxes these restrictions. The model includes three labor market states, full-time work, partial retirement, and full retirement; reverse flows from states of lesser to greater work; an extended choice set created when spouses make independent retirement decisions; heterogeneity in time preference; varying taste parameters for full-time and part-time work; and the possibility of changes in preferences after retirement.

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Factors Affecting Worker Well-being: The Impact of Change in the Labor Market
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-150-3

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Abstract

Institutional structures of professional career paths often support breadwinner–homemaker families, with a stay at home wife available full time to support the professional (and children), so the professional can devote complete energy and time to developing a career. This research examines how two partners in the same narrowly structured, fast track occupational culture such as those occurring for dual military officer couples shape how women and men negotiate decision making and life events. Data from interviews with 23 dual U.S. Navy officer couples build upon Becker and Moen’s (1999) scaling back notions. With both spouses in these careers, placing limits on work is extremely difficult due to fast track cultures that demand higher status choices and structures that formally do not reliably consider collocations. Trading off occurs, but with distress due to the unique demands on two partners in the fast track culture, which means career death for some. Two partners in fast track careers may not yet have given up on two careers as many peers may have, but they lose a great deal, including time together and their desired number of children. But they ultimately posit individual choice rather than focusing on structural change. The pressured family life resulting is likely similar to that for partners in other narrowly structured, fast track cultures such as in law firms and academia.

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Visions of the 21st Century Family: Transforming Structures and Identities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-028-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2004

Judith R. Gordon and Karen S. Whelan‐Berry

Women on average still have more responsibility for home, family life, and child care than men. Extensive research has focused on the needs of, and support required by…

Abstract

Women on average still have more responsibility for home, family life, and child care than men. Extensive research has focused on the needs of, and support required by, these working women, most often exploring related organizational programs and benefits. This paper attempts to remedy this deficiency by examining the roles women perceive their spouses or partners play in these families in sharing home and family responsibilities and supporting the careers of these women. It explores the differences in the roles that women in early, middle, and late life perceive their spouses or partners play. Differences exist in women's perceptions of how spouses or partners manage family finances, support the women's careers, contribute to household management, and provide interpersonal support. Specific roles and the resulting support are related to the life satisfaction, job satisfaction, and work‐life balance of some but not all cohorts of the women surveyed.

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Women in Management Review, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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Book part
Publication date: 1 June 2007

Stephen Sweet, Phyllis Moen and Peter Meiksins

Both declining job security and the need for dual careers constitute two complicating factors in the lives of middle-class American families. Rarely, however, are these two

Abstract

Both declining job security and the need for dual careers constitute two complicating factors in the lives of middle-class American families. Rarely, however, are these two phenomena investigated simultaneously. Drawing on both survey and in-depth interview data of a sample of middle-class couples in upstate New York, we document the pervasiveness of couple-level job insecurity, and the extents at-risk couples anticipate job loss and employers prepare workers for job termination. We argue that the new middle-class job insecurity is effectively doubled for dual-earner couples, reshaping the temporalities of career development across the life course.

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Workplace Temporalities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1268-9

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Toyin Ajibade Adisa, Ellis L.C. Osabutey and Gbolahan Gbadamosi

The implications of the work-family balance (WFB) of dual-earner couples are well known; however, the extant literature on this topic has failed to adequately explore the…

Abstract

Purpose

The implications of the work-family balance (WFB) of dual-earner couples are well known; however, the extant literature on this topic has failed to adequately explore the context of Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), specifically Nigeria. The purpose of this paper is to examine the implications of the WFB of dual-earner couples in Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper employs a qualitative methodology in order to explore the effect of couples’ dual-earner status on their WFB in an African context by using Nigerian medical practitioners as the empirical focus.

Findings

The findings reveal that the dual-earner status provides some respite from financial hardship and improves family finances, which subsequently enhances WFB. However, the dual-earner status also has negative impacts on WFB in terms of work performance, dysfunctionality, and associated societal problems.

Originality/value

This paper provides insights into the WFB of dual-earner couples in the non-western context of SSA, highlighting the previously unexplored implications of dual-earner status in the context of SSA.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1988

David Macarov

The author argues that we must stop and take a look at what our insistence on human labour as the basis of our society is doing to us, and begin to search for possible…

Abstract

The author argues that we must stop and take a look at what our insistence on human labour as the basis of our society is doing to us, and begin to search for possible alternatives. We need the vision and the courage to aim for the highest level of technology attainable for the widest possible use in both industry and services. We need financial arrangements that will encourage people to invent themselves out of work. Our goal, the article argues, must be the reduction of human labour to the greatest extent possible, to free people for more enjoyable, creative, human activities.

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International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 8 no. 2/3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2008

Helen Lingard and Valerie Francis

This paper seeks to identify the adaptive strategies of couples in which at least one spouse/partner is employed in a professional role in the Australian construction industry.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to identify the adaptive strategies of couples in which at least one spouse/partner is employed in a professional role in the Australian construction industry.

Design/methodology/approach

Most studies of work‐family balance identify the determinants and outcomes of work‐family conflict for individual employees. However, there is a growing recognition that analyses or work hours and coping strategies require a couple‐level analysis. The reason for this is that couples lead “linked lives” in which the work circumstances and experiences of one spouse/partner inevitably impact on the other spouse/partner. Quantitative and qualitative data are combined to reveal the adaptive strategies used by workers in the Australian construction industry in juggling their work and non‐work lives.

Findings

The results reveal that standard construction industry work practices present significant challenges for dual earner couples. Adaptive strategies are highly gendered, most frequently involving wives or female domestic partners reducing their involvement in paid work.

Practical implications

The intensification of work and demographic shifts have created a “time squeeze” for many families who juggle two paid jobs with their family goals and responsibilities. Failure to provide regular (and reasonable) hours of employment in the construction industry is likely to discourage the entry of young male and female employees, particularly those who desire a more “hands on” experience of parenting.

Originality/value

The analysis of “within‐couple” adaptive strategies builds on previous individual level analyses of work‐life balance in construction and suggests that long and inflexible work hours promote adaptive strategies based upon a gendered “breadwinner‐home‐maker” model.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 15 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1982

Adam Jamrozic and Marilyn Hoey

This monograph is an attempt to examine some of the changes which have occurred in the structure of the workforce in Australia during the 1970s. The study has the form of…

Abstract

This monograph is an attempt to examine some of the changes which have occurred in the structure of the workforce in Australia during the 1970s. The study has the form of exploratory analysis of data extracted from official labour market statistics, and its aims are to consider three broad issues: the significance changes in the labour market may have for Australian society, and particularly for the people who constitute the workforce, actual or potential; the implications of those changes for social policy; and the appropriate research methods of identifying social and social welfare issues in economic activities.

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International Journal of Manpower, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1983

R.G.B. Fyffe

This book is a policy proposal aimed at the democratic left. It is concerned with gradual but radical reform of the socio‐economic system. An integrated policy of…

Abstract

This book is a policy proposal aimed at the democratic left. It is concerned with gradual but radical reform of the socio‐economic system. An integrated policy of industrial and economic democracy, which centres around the establishment of a new sector of employee‐controlled enterprises, is presented. The proposal would retain the mix‐ed economy, but transform it into a much better “mixture”, with increased employee‐power in all sectors. While there is much of enduring value in our liberal western way of life, gross inequalities of wealth and power persist in our society.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 3 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1994

Phyllis Moen and Francille M. Firebaugh

Titmus defines “policy” as “the principles that govern action directed towards given ends”. Höhn and Lüscher define family policy as “public activities, measures, and…

Abstract

Titmus defines “policy” as “the principles that govern action directed towards given ends”. Höhn and Lüscher define family policy as “public activities, measures, and organizations that attempt to recognize, support, complement, and thus influence or even enforce specifically or generally defined achievements of the family”. Thus family policy can include a wide range of activities of governments and organizations, including private associations, that seek to transform families and increase family well‐being.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 14 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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