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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1997

Michael T. MacHatton, Thomas Van Dyke and Robert Steiner

Reports on a survey of chain and independent restaurants in the USA designed to learn about current practices in selection and retention of managerial personnel; of 584…

Abstract

Reports on a survey of chain and independent restaurants in the USA designed to learn about current practices in selection and retention of managerial personnel; of 584 surveys sent out, 112 were returned for a response rate of 19.2 per cent. Findings indicate that reference checks, structured interviews and unstructured interviews are the most frequently‐used and effective selection procedures. Chain restaurants are more likely to use structured interviews, credit checks and police checks than independent restaurants. Annual managerial turnover is 18.6 per cent for the combined sample and costs US$8,858 per turnover incident. Chain restaurants report higher and more costly managerial turnover (29.7 per cent for chains against 5.8 per cent turnover for independents; US$11,112 per incident for chains against US$3,386 for independents). Provides two examples of good selection practices.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1997

Jaksa Jack Kivela

Determinant attribute analysis technique that isolates critical product attributes, can be a useful marketing tool for organizations hoping to penetrate new markets, and…

Abstract

Determinant attribute analysis technique that isolates critical product attributes, can be a useful marketing tool for organizations hoping to penetrate new markets, and re‐examine their current market needs. Uses restaurants in Hong Kong as an example. While consumers say that food quality and food type are the critical variables for restaurant selection or rejection, other “lesser” choice variables may be the deciding factors in the final restaurants selection or reflection. The four restaurant types which emerged from the study are: fine dining/gourmet; theme/atmosphere; family/popular; and convenience/fast‐food restaurants. The results indicate that customers’ perceptions and therefore their preferences of choice variables, varied considerably by restaurant type, dining‐out occasion, age, and occupation. Suggests that the importance of perceivably unimportant attributes, can determine customers’ final restaurant choice. It is suggested, therefore, that the quality of food and type of food should not be the only attributes underpinning the restaurateurs’ marketing strategies in Hong Kong.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 31 August 2012

Usman Ehsan

There are different factors that affect customers' experiences at restaurants, and this could lead towards the selection or rejection of a fast food restaurant. The…

Abstract

Purpose

There are different factors that affect customers' experiences at restaurants, and this could lead towards the selection or rejection of a fast food restaurant. The primary purpose of this study is to explore the factors that are important for the selection of restaurants and also to identify the cultural or regional differences in consumer behaviours amongst student customers in relation to international fast food restaurants.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 447 questionnaires were randomly distributed among university students of three cities. Data analysis was done in SPSS Version 17. Important factors were identified by factor analysis and ANOVA was used to measure the differences (among cities).

Findings

According to the findings, customers considered price, variety of food, promotional deals and timely service as the important factors for the selection of fast food restaurants. Different factors were found in different cities. This implies that the choice and selection criteria of customers from different cities in the same country for fast food restaurants may vary.

Research limitations/implications

The results of this study should only be generalised to the fast food sector as the research only explored the fast food industry. The respondents were selected only from university students of three cities in Pakistan. Other customer segments and geographical areas should be included in future studies.

Practical implications

The results enable marketers to focus on key points in formulating different strategies, like designing the pricing strategy, the service blueprint, the menu, and positioning and promotional strategies, so that they can provide memorable experiences to customers. The findings also suggest that while operating in multicultural countries, customers need to observe closely. Also, adaptation to local cultures should not be limited to the national level; it should also be tailored to the regional level (cities).

Originality/value

This paper puts forward the selection criteria for fast food restaurants in a large and ethnically diverse country like Pakistan. The paper also provides useful information for both academicians and marketers about new and emerging areas in how consumer choices vary in culturally diverse nations.

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2007

Mauro N. Garcia, George Bedinelli Rossi, Dirceu Da Silva and Fernando Debessa

This research aims at creating a model that could explain consumers’ value perception of restaurants attended on Sundays in the city of São Paulo. The research was carried…

Abstract

This research aims at creating a model that could explain consumers’ value perception of restaurants attended on Sundays in the city of São Paulo. The research was carried out in two phases. The first was an exploratory research – a focus‐group type with two groups of eight individuals each, whose objective was to discover the main variables that impact the value perception of consumers who attend restaurants on Sundays. Thus, a balanced Likert‐type scale was generated, with seven levels of concurrence. The scale was submitted to five experts for a theoretical validation and was applied to a nonprobabilistic sample pursuant to the judgment of 360 consumers with the same profile as of those of the focus group. Then, in a second phase, validation of the scale by the confirmatory factor analysis method was provided as well as the building and analysis of five causal models by the method of structural equation modeling and the five‐hypotheses test. The final model with a better adjustment (hypothesis 1) was composed of PRICE as an endogenous variable and ENVIRONMENT, SERVICE, FOOD, and HYGIENE as exogenous variables. Such conclusions allow the perception of the decision process in relation to restaurant selection in two phases: (1) when a group of restaurants is chosen, and (2) the moment when the PRICE variable takes over the role of defining the value offered by each restaurant, which will motivate the selection.

Details

Management Research: Journal of the Iberoamerican Academy of Management, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1536-5433

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1998

Daniel A. Emenheiser, Joan M. Clay and Radesh Palakurthi

Today’s successful restaurant manager needs to possess a diversity of talents, abilities, and skills. Presents profiles of successful managerial recruits for quick…

Abstract

Today’s successful restaurant manager needs to possess a diversity of talents, abilities, and skills. Presents profiles of successful managerial recruits for quick service, midscale and upscale restaurants in the US. Factor analysis was used to reduce the number of attributes and traits that were identified for being a successful manager in the restaurant industry. Seventy‐two success attributes and traits were reduced to 12 identifiable components. The components’ relationships with the demographic factors were then studied using Chi‐square tests. Profiles for being a successful manager in quick service, midscale and upscale restaurants were developed.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 20 January 2021

Bendegul Okumus, Ahmet Bulent Ozturk and Anil Bilgihan

The purpose of this research is to examine the dining out activities of Gen Y's in the United States. In particular, it focuses on dining frequency, restaurant selection

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to examine the dining out activities of Gen Y's in the United States. In particular, it focuses on dining frequency, restaurant selection, restaurant segments and demographic features of Gen Yers.

Design/methodology/approach

Empirical data for this study were collected from 631 Gen Y's living in the United States.

Findings

The research findings reveal a nascent exploration of eating out preferences of the Gen Y population in an industrialized country in the food service context.

Research limitations/implications

Generation Y is a lucrative and growing customer group for the US foodservice industry. They dine out more frequently than the rest of the population and their dining out preferences are different from other cohorts.

Originality/value

This study offers some practical implications on Gen Y's dining out behavior for food service industry and restaurateurs.

Details

International Hospitality Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2516-8142

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

Beverley Sparks, John Bowen and Stefanie Klag

Previous research has shown that restaurants are an important factor in the choice of a holiday destination for some tourists. Research has also found that the restaurants

Abstract

Previous research has shown that restaurants are an important factor in the choice of a holiday destination for some tourists. Research has also found that the restaurants at a destination can enhance the guests’ overall satisfaction with the destination. This research was sponsored by the Co‐operative Research Centre for Sustainable Tourism in Australia and investigates the relationship between the tourist destination, restaurants and tourists. The study is based on the results of interviews with 459 tourists. The findings of the study provide support for the proposition that tourists perceive restaurants as an important attribute of a tourist destination. The study also provides insight into how tourists select restaurants. This information is useful to managers of restaurants in tourist destinations. Both destination marketers and restaurant managers will benefit from this study.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2012

Girish Prayag, Martin Landré and Chris Ryan

The purpose of this study is to assess the evolution of restaurant locations in the city of Hamilton over a 12‐year period (1996 to 2008) using GIS techniques. Retail…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to assess the evolution of restaurant locations in the city of Hamilton over a 12‐year period (1996 to 2008) using GIS techniques. Retail theories such as central place, spatial interaction and principle of minimum differentiation are applied to the restaurant setting.

Design/methodology/approach

A database of restaurants was compiled using the NZ yellow pages and contained 981 entries that consisted mainly of location addresses and types of cuisine. This paper focuses on locational patterns only.

Findings

A process of geo‐coding and clustering enabled the identification of two clustering periods over 12 years for city restaurants, indicating locational patterns of agglomeration within a short walking distance of the CBD and spill over effects to the north of the city.

Research limitations/implications

The data do not allow statistical analysis of the variables causing the clustering but offer a visual description of the evolution. Explanations are offered on the possible planning regimes, retail provision and population changes that may explain this evolution.

Practical implications

The findings allow identification of land use patterns in Hamilton city and potential areas where new restaurants could be developed. Also, the usefulness of geo‐coded data in identifying clustering effects is highlighted.

Originality/value

Existing location studies relate mostly to site selection criteria in the retailing industry while few have considered the evolution of restaurant locations in a specific geographic area. This paper offers a case study of Hamilton city and highlights the usefulness of GIS techniques in understanding locational patterns.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 25 July 2019

Ghazala Khan and Faiza Khan

The purpose of this study is to investigate what cues or surrogate indicators Muslims use to determine whether restaurants are suitable for dining purposes in the absence…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate what cues or surrogate indicators Muslims use to determine whether restaurants are suitable for dining purposes in the absence of the halal logo and to examine if the cues used are different among Muslims from non-Muslim countries as opposed to Muslims from Muslim countries.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected via semi-structured interviews in one Muslim majority (Malaysia) and one non-Muslim country (the UK). A total of 16 adults participated in the study with an equal representation from both countries.

Findings

In the absence of the halal logo, participants relied on extrinsic cues such as the presence of other Muslim-looking customers and service personnel to determine whether a restaurant was deemed safe for dining in. The location of a restaurant was a strong indicator for Muslims in both Muslim and non-Muslim countries. In the absence of the halal logo, participants read the menus carefully, queried the service personnel for additional information and selected safer options, such as vegetarian and seafood.

Research limitations/implications

The study used a small sample, and therefore, the findings are tentative.

Practical implications

Given the growth of Muslim population in many non-Muslim countries, it is important for restaurants in non-Muslim countries not to marginalize this customer base. Trust is a key issue and service providers without the halal logo should gain the trust of Muslim customers by training service personnel and equipping them with knowledge of what halal means, developing menus with vegetarian and seafood options, providing detailed information on ingredients and communicating this on their websites and social media sites. They could also consider working with Muslim food and travel bloggers to promote themselves to a Muslim audience. They can develop a more Muslim sympathetic marketing approach and consider using separate cooking and serving utensils to gain trust and patronage of Muslim customers as well as to appeal to a larger market (vegans/vegetarians).

Originality/value

The present study is one of the first studies that concentrates on gaining an insight into how Muslims make decision pertaining to the selection and dining at a restaurant in the absence of the halal logo. A major contribution of the study is the identification of cues that assist Muslims when evaluating and selecting alternative food options in the absence of a halal logo.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2001

Marta Pedraja and Jesús Yagüe

The need to acquire restaurant services may be motivated by various reasons but, whatever the reason, the potential customer has to search for information on the desired…

Abstract

The need to acquire restaurant services may be motivated by various reasons but, whatever the reason, the potential customer has to search for information on the desired service in order to compare the alternatives and make the best purchase decision. Knowing how potential clients make this information search is fundamental for restaurant company managers so that they can carry out marketing communications strategies that facilitate the selection of their restaurant by potential customers. This paper examines the external information search process carried out by potential customers. It aims to determine what information search activities are carried out and what the motivating factors are for these activities. A survey was used to analyse the services offered by restaurants in the city of Zaragoza in the north‐east of Spain. The results of the survey and implications for restaurant managers are discussed.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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