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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1997

Michael T. MacHatton, Thomas Van Dyke and Robert Steiner

Reports on a survey of chain and independent restaurants in the USA designed to learn about current practices in selection and retention of managerial personnel; of 584…

3617

Abstract

Reports on a survey of chain and independent restaurants in the USA designed to learn about current practices in selection and retention of managerial personnel; of 584 surveys sent out, 112 were returned for a response rate of 19.2 per cent. Findings indicate that reference checks, structured interviews and unstructured interviews are the most frequently‐used and effective selection procedures. Chain restaurants are more likely to use structured interviews, credit checks and police checks than independent restaurants. Annual managerial turnover is 18.6 per cent for the combined sample and costs US$8,858 per turnover incident. Chain restaurants report higher and more costly managerial turnover (29.7 per cent for chains against 5.8 per cent turnover for independents; US$11,112 per incident for chains against US$3,386 for independents). Provides two examples of good selection practices.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1997

Jaksa Jack Kivela

Determinant attribute analysis technique that isolates critical product attributes, can be a useful marketing tool for organizations hoping to penetrate new markets, and…

13944

Abstract

Determinant attribute analysis technique that isolates critical product attributes, can be a useful marketing tool for organizations hoping to penetrate new markets, and re‐examine their current market needs. Uses restaurants in Hong Kong as an example. While consumers say that food quality and food type are the critical variables for restaurant selection or rejection, other “lesser” choice variables may be the deciding factors in the final restaurants selection or reflection. The four restaurant types which emerged from the study are: fine dining/gourmet; theme/atmosphere; family/popular; and convenience/fast‐food restaurants. The results indicate that customers’ perceptions and therefore their preferences of choice variables, varied considerably by restaurant type, dining‐out occasion, age, and occupation. Suggests that the importance of perceivably unimportant attributes, can determine customers’ final restaurant choice. It is suggested, therefore, that the quality of food and type of food should not be the only attributes underpinning the restaurateurs’ marketing strategies in Hong Kong.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 August 2012

Usman Ehsan

There are different factors that affect customers' experiences at restaurants, and this could lead towards the selection or rejection of a fast food restaurant. The…

6578

Abstract

Purpose

There are different factors that affect customers' experiences at restaurants, and this could lead towards the selection or rejection of a fast food restaurant. The primary purpose of this study is to explore the factors that are important for the selection of restaurants and also to identify the cultural or regional differences in consumer behaviours amongst student customers in relation to international fast food restaurants.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 447 questionnaires were randomly distributed among university students of three cities. Data analysis was done in SPSS Version 17. Important factors were identified by factor analysis and ANOVA was used to measure the differences (among cities).

Findings

According to the findings, customers considered price, variety of food, promotional deals and timely service as the important factors for the selection of fast food restaurants. Different factors were found in different cities. This implies that the choice and selection criteria of customers from different cities in the same country for fast food restaurants may vary.

Research limitations/implications

The results of this study should only be generalised to the fast food sector as the research only explored the fast food industry. The respondents were selected only from university students of three cities in Pakistan. Other customer segments and geographical areas should be included in future studies.

Practical implications

The results enable marketers to focus on key points in formulating different strategies, like designing the pricing strategy, the service blueprint, the menu, and positioning and promotional strategies, so that they can provide memorable experiences to customers. The findings also suggest that while operating in multicultural countries, customers need to observe closely. Also, adaptation to local cultures should not be limited to the national level; it should also be tailored to the regional level (cities).

Originality/value

This paper puts forward the selection criteria for fast food restaurants in a large and ethnically diverse country like Pakistan. The paper also provides useful information for both academicians and marketers about new and emerging areas in how consumer choices vary in culturally diverse nations.

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2022

Muhammad Asghar Ali, Ding Hooi Ting, Muhammad Umer Azeem and Amir Zaib Abbasi

This paper aims to investigate the impact of perceived usefulness of online reviews and crowd cues on restaurant selection. In addition, the authors also examine the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the impact of perceived usefulness of online reviews and crowd cues on restaurant selection. In addition, the authors also examine the moderating role of perceived crowding and gender in this process.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed hypotheses were tested with survey data (N = 200) collected from customers visiting full-service restaurants in Malaysia. The data were analyzed using SEM through Smart PLS.

Findings

The findings supported that the perceived usefulness of online reviews and perceived crowding have a positive effect on a consumer's purchase intentions, i.e. their decision of restaurant selection. Besides, a higher level of perceived crowding strengthens the relationship between the perceived usefulness of online reviews and their purchase intentions. This finding delineates that consumers prefer to dine in a crowded place with useful online reviews in an unfamiliar place. Finally, the results show that the effect of the usefulness of online reviews on purchase intentions does not vary with respect to gender (no significant contingent effect). However, the effect of perceived crowding varies with respect to gender – male customers have higher intentions to join crowded restaurants as compared to females.

Research limitations/implications

Limitation of this study is its cross-sectional research design; data were collected in a single time frame. Longitudinal research design can be used to get in-depth knowledge of this phenomenon. Secondly, a non-probability sampling technique was used in this study, future research can used probability sampling technique to enhance generalizability of the study. Moreover, this study focused on the human crowding aspect, future studies can cover both aspects of crowding (human crowding and spatial crowding) in retailing or other service sectors (Blut and Iyer, 2020).

Practical implications

This study has multiple practical implications.

Originality/value

This study extends the current research on usefulness of online reviews and perceived crowding by investigating its direct and conditional effects. Specifically, the authors contribute in extant research by explaining its differential effects for male and female customers, when they select which restaurants to dine.

Details

EuroMed Journal of Business, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1450-2194

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2007

Mauro N. Garcia, George Bedinelli Rossi, Dirceu Da Silva and Fernando Debessa

This research aims at creating a model that could explain consumers’ value perception of restaurants attended on Sundays in the city of São Paulo. The research was carried…

Abstract

This research aims at creating a model that could explain consumers’ value perception of restaurants attended on Sundays in the city of São Paulo. The research was carried out in two phases. The first was an exploratory research – a focus‐group type with two groups of eight individuals each, whose objective was to discover the main variables that impact the value perception of consumers who attend restaurants on Sundays. Thus, a balanced Likert‐type scale was generated, with seven levels of concurrence. The scale was submitted to five experts for a theoretical validation and was applied to a nonprobabilistic sample pursuant to the judgment of 360 consumers with the same profile as of those of the focus group. Then, in a second phase, validation of the scale by the confirmatory factor analysis method was provided as well as the building and analysis of five causal models by the method of structural equation modeling and the five‐hypotheses test. The final model with a better adjustment (hypothesis 1) was composed of PRICE as an endogenous variable and ENVIRONMENT, SERVICE, FOOD, and HYGIENE as exogenous variables. Such conclusions allow the perception of the decision process in relation to restaurant selection in two phases: (1) when a group of restaurants is chosen, and (2) the moment when the PRICE variable takes over the role of defining the value offered by each restaurant, which will motivate the selection.

Details

Management Research: Journal of the Iberoamerican Academy of Management, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1536-5433

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 October 2022

Soomin Shin and Meehee Cho

Although much empirical literature confirmed the foodservice industry’s significant impact on the environment, little scholarly attention has been paid to how restaurants

Abstract

Purpose

Although much empirical literature confirmed the foodservice industry’s significant impact on the environment, little scholarly attention has been paid to how restaurants can improve environmental performance. This study aimed to verify the impact of restaurant environmental cognition (EC) on environmental performance through green supplier selection (GSS) and joint actions (JAs).

Design/methodology/approach

Using an online survey company, the questionnaire was distributed to restaurant owners/or managers who were qualified to provide accurate information regarding their operational practices. A total of 285 responses were included in the analysis. Confirmatory factor analysis was conducted to verify the validity and reliability of the measures. The SPSS PROCESS macro was used to test the hypothesized relationships.

Findings

The study showed that EC has positive and direct effects on restaurant environmental performance (REP). Each mediator of GSS and JAs played a positive mediating role between EC and REP. GSS and JAs also played multiple positive mediating roles between EC and REP. This study revealed that a path mediating between EC and REP through GSS can be used to derive the most optimal results.

Originality/value

This study focused on the importance of restaurant EC, which is a fundamental driver for restaurant environmental practices, but is overlooked in the relevant literature. The findings provide novel information that can be applied to operate green restaurants specifically through GSS and JAs. In particular, the present approach expands the existing knowledge on sustainable restaurant management by investigating EC from an organization perspective.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2022

Cortney L. Norris, Michelle Russen and Scott Taylor Jr

The experiential value scale (EVS) has been widely applied in hospitality literature in a postconsumption manner to predict organizational outcomes; however, it lacks a…

Abstract

Purpose

The experiential value scale (EVS) has been widely applied in hospitality literature in a postconsumption manner to predict organizational outcomes; however, it lacks a key component that captures the inherently social nature of the restaurant industry: social value. This study had two goals: to validate the inclusion of social value with the EVS and apply the new scale to predict intent to dine in an independently owned restaurant.

Design/methodology/approach

Using cross-sectional survey design and factor analysis, the pilot study tests the experiential value scale with the addition of social value. In the main study, the validated scale is used to predict intent to dine in an independent restaurant using structural equation modeling. Respondents for both studies were recruited from the survey panel site Prolific, generating 266 usable samples for the pilot and 259 for the main study.

Findings

The findings suggest a high correlation between social value and the other experiential values, creating the EVS + SV scale. Using the new scale to predict dining intent, service quality was a positive predictor in selecting an independent restaurant. However, limitations, such as sample origin and time, are further discussed, and future research to alleviate these is recommended.

Research limitations/implications

Social value has been shown as an additional part of the EVS. Restauranteurs and hospitality researchers alike may use the new EVS + SV scale to determine the values that most influence customers' restaurant selection and make recommendations on how to use limited capital.

Originality/value

The current study added social value to the EVS, creating what has been referred to as the EVS + SV scale in this study. Additionally, unlike others, the EVS + SV scale was used as an antecedent to restaurant choice, meaning customers will assess certain aspects of a restaurant before deciding where to dine out, allowing restaurant operators to leverage their strengths and attract customers.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Insights, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9792

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1998

Daniel A. Emenheiser, Joan M. Clay and Radesh Palakurthi

Today’s successful restaurant manager needs to possess a diversity of talents, abilities, and skills. Presents profiles of successful managerial recruits for quick…

5459

Abstract

Today’s successful restaurant manager needs to possess a diversity of talents, abilities, and skills. Presents profiles of successful managerial recruits for quick service, midscale and upscale restaurants in the US. Factor analysis was used to reduce the number of attributes and traits that were identified for being a successful manager in the restaurant industry. Seventy‐two success attributes and traits were reduced to 12 identifiable components. The components’ relationships with the demographic factors were then studied using Chi‐square tests. Profiles for being a successful manager in quick service, midscale and upscale restaurants were developed.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 20 January 2021

Bendegul Okumus, Ahmet Bulent Ozturk and Anil Bilgihan

The purpose of this research is to examine the dining out activities of Gen Y's in the United States. In particular, it focuses on dining frequency, restaurant selection

4587

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to examine the dining out activities of Gen Y's in the United States. In particular, it focuses on dining frequency, restaurant selection, restaurant segments and demographic features of Gen Yers.

Design/methodology/approach

Empirical data for this study were collected from 631 Gen Y's living in the United States.

Findings

The research findings reveal a nascent exploration of eating out preferences of the Gen Y population in an industrialized country in the food service context.

Research limitations/implications

Generation Y is a lucrative and growing customer group for the US foodservice industry. They dine out more frequently than the rest of the population and their dining out preferences are different from other cohorts.

Originality/value

This study offers some practical implications on Gen Y's dining out behavior for food service industry and restaurateurs.

Details

International Hospitality Review, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2516-8142

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

Beverley Sparks, John Bowen and Stefanie Klag

Previous research has shown that restaurants are an important factor in the choice of a holiday destination for some tourists. Research has also found that the restaurants

14401

Abstract

Previous research has shown that restaurants are an important factor in the choice of a holiday destination for some tourists. Research has also found that the restaurants at a destination can enhance the guests’ overall satisfaction with the destination. This research was sponsored by the Co‐operative Research Centre for Sustainable Tourism in Australia and investigates the relationship between the tourist destination, restaurants and tourists. The study is based on the results of interviews with 459 tourists. The findings of the study provide support for the proposition that tourists perceive restaurants as an important attribute of a tourist destination. The study also provides insight into how tourists select restaurants. This information is useful to managers of restaurants in tourist destinations. Both destination marketers and restaurant managers will benefit from this study.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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