Search results

1 – 10 of over 2000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 July 2019

Nataly Suarez, Katerina Berezina, Wan Yang and Susan Gordon

The purpose of this study is to explain the impact of innovation characteristics (relative advantage, compatibility, complexity and perceived risk) and individual…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explain the impact of innovation characteristics (relative advantage, compatibility, complexity and perceived risk) and individual differences (inertia, technology anxiety, need for interaction and previous experience) on customer intentions to adopt tablet-based menus in various restaurants settings.

Design/methodology/approach

An experimental design was used in this study to explore tablet-based menu acceptance intentions across three restaurant settings: quick-service, midscale and upscale. A total of 415 participants were randomly assigned to one of the three scenarios describing a dining experience. Each scenario placed participants in a restaurant setting where a tablet-based menu was a part of the guests’ dining experience.

Findings

The study results indicated that out of the four innovation characteristics, compatibility and relative advantage are strong predictors of adoption intention of tablet-based menus. Among customer individual differences, technology anxiety and need for interaction were not found to have a statistically significant impact on intentions to adopt tablet-based menus. It was also found that customers dining at quick-service and midscale restaurants are more likely to adopt tablet-based menus than customers dining at upscale restaurants.

Practical implications

Managers in quick-service and midscale restaurants may consider investing in tablet-based menus, as customers of these restaurant types demonstrate higher adoption intentions compared to the customers of upscale dining establishments. The results of this study suggest that upscale restaurants should plan carefully before switching to table-based menus.

Originality/value

The findings of this study may assist restaurant managers in recognizing the importance of customer acceptance of new technologies such as tablet-based menus, which will lead to informed decisions about implementing tablet-based menus in their establishments.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 31 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 April 2014

Srikanth Beldona, Nadria Buchanan and Brian L. Miller

The aim of this paper is to determine the relative efficacy of an e-tablet menu over the traditional paper-based menu across the parameters of order information quality…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to determine the relative efficacy of an e-tablet menu over the traditional paper-based menu across the parameters of order information quality, menu usability, and ordering satisfaction using customer perceptions.

Design/methodology/approach

Two types of data were collected: customer perceptions using an instrument comprising academically underpinned constructs and observational data that involved ordering times, logs of any customization requests, and notes gathered from interactions with restaurant staff.

Findings

Findings indicate that e-tablet menus are significantly superior to the traditional paper-based menu across all parameters. Restaurateurs should be cognizant of customization options to significantly enhance order information quality, improve customer service and boost sales.

Research limitations/implications

The findings support the idea that the use of technology does help to enhance the service experience, specifically the ordering experience for the customer.

Practical implications

Electronic tablets have the ability to transfer greater levels of information in an interactive manner thereby enhancing the role of the menu in the merchandising of a restaurant's offerings.

Originality/value

Although there is evidence of the importance of restaurant menus to the success of restaurants, little is known about the influence of the use of electronic menus on the ordering experience. This study provides findings that focus on the usability of menus and their impact on the ordering experience.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 13 August 2012

Robert Gallicano, Robert J. Blomme and Arjan van Rheede

Previous research has concluded that there is consumer desire for nutrition information to be provided on restaurant menu items and restaurant customers presented with…

Abstract

Previous research has concluded that there is consumer desire for nutrition information to be provided on restaurant menu items and restaurant customers presented with this information will make healthier menu choices (Mills & Thomas, 2008). Limited research has been performed in a restaurant setting measuring real rather than intended behavior. The purpose of this research experiment is to measure consumer response, in a full-service restaurant setting, to nutrition information on menu items and subsequently determine if consumers will use this information in their menu item choice. An experiment was conducted with 264 restaurant customers at a full-service a la carte restaurant. Customers chose from menu items labeled with or without a Healthy Choice® label. A logistic regression model was used to predict whether people would choose Healthy Choice menu items. Fifty-four percent of restaurant customers chose the healthy choice menu item. The logistic regression confirms that those people who desire nutrition information also use this information in their menu choice. The study concludes with recommendations for the industry on directing consumer menu choice toward healthier items.

Details

Advances in Hospitality and Leisure
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-936-3

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 January 2019

EunHa Jeong, SooCheong (Shawn) Jang, Carl Behnke, James Anderson and Jonathon Day

The purpose of this study is to explore the dimensions of restaurant customers’ engagement or disengagement with healthy eating in terms of individual and environmental…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore the dimensions of restaurant customers’ engagement or disengagement with healthy eating in terms of individual and environmental factors to develop a scale. The results identified the underlying constructs of customers’ individual motives for and perceived barriers to healthy eating, as well as environmental elements of restaurants that encourage or discourage healthy eating.

Design/methodology/approach

To develop an appropriate set of measures to assess factors influencing customers’ healthy eating behaviors at restaurants, the current study undertook the five steps of scale development suggested by Churchill (1979): specifying the domain of constructs, generating a pool of initial measurement items, assessing content adequacy, administering questionnaires (an online survey method) and purifying and finalizing the measurement (via exploratory factor analysis (EFA) using 410 samples and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) using 423 samples).

Findings

The results revealed ten individual factors (health, body image, weight control, feeling better, unappealing food, cost perception, lack of knowledge, state of mind (stress), lack of self-control and negative influences) and five environmental factors (healthy indications, social impact, availability of healthy menu, price policy and unhealthy indications) influencing customers’ healthy eating behaviors at restaurants.

Originality/value

This study developed an appropriate set of measures to assess individual and environmental factors influencing restaurant customers’ healthy eating behaviors, along with identifying underlying sub-constructs. The reliability and validity of the scale and the factor structure are presented and potential applications and theoretical contributions of the scale are provided as well.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Rossano Linassi, Anete Alberton and Sidnei Vieira Marinho

This paper aims to examine whether using menu engineering (ME) together with activity-based costing (ABC) for menu analysis provides new insights into true menu

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine whether using menu engineering (ME) together with activity-based costing (ABC) for menu analysis provides new insights into true menu profitability. The traditional ME approach only uses food costs to determine the contribution margin (CM) of individual menu items. This combined approach uses both food and traceable operating costs to estimate CMs more accurately.

Design/methodology/approach

An improved ME model was developed and tested in an oriental restaurant in Brazil. Direct observation of restaurant activities allowed most costs to be traced (not simply allocated) to individual menu items.

Findings

The results revealed small differences in the rankings between the traditional approach and ABC/ME, demonstrating that the integration of ABC with ME made it to possible to identify increased food-costs and lower CMs for all groups of menu items. The results also show that ABC methods are applicable to an oriental-style restaurant.

Research limitations/implications

Just one restaurant and only 80 per cent of the menu were examined in this study. Future research should apply the model used here to other restaurant types located in different geographical areas to validate the approach.

Practical implications

The results suggest that ME can be improved upon by first assessing variable costs using ABC methods.

Originality/value

This paper combines two different analytic techniques (ME and ABC) into a new approach that reveals the true picture of profit and loss for a menu from a restaurant in Brazil.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 28 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 24 May 2013

Chin‐Yi Fang, Pao‐Yu (Jessie) Peng and Wei‐Ta (Woody) Pan

The purpose of this study is threefold: to use an innovative metafrontier‐to‐data‐envelopment analysis (MDEA) model incorporating multiple outputs and inputs – including…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is threefold: to use an innovative metafrontier‐to‐data‐envelopment analysis (MDEA) model incorporating multiple outputs and inputs – including the item revenue, gross profit, food costs, time‐driven labor costs, and other operating expenses (OOEs) – to distinguish four quadrants based on efficiency and profit to offer different strategies to the restaurateur under study; to compare the proficiency levels of the different meal categories of the à la carte and combo set menus using the metatechnology ratio (MTR) via the MDEA; and to use slack‐based analyses with simulation to improve the financial performance of a teppanyaki‐style restaurant.

Design/methodology/approach

Six months of point of sale (POS) data are obtained from a teppanyaki‐style restaurant. The proposed inputs are categorized into total food costs, total labor cost, the number of processes, and OOEs. Two outputs (total revenue and gross profit) are used to assess the efficiency of the menu items. The MTR is used to differentiate the proficiency level of the heterogeneous meal categories and to create four quadrants based on the efficiency index and financial performance.

Findings

The MTR is lower for the combo set category than for the à la carte category. Four quadrants are obtained based on the efficiency and financial performance to provide further menu suggestions. The MDEA analysis yields menu suggestions that could enhance the overall efficiency and profitability of the menu items. A simulation using these two models is conducted and shows that the restaurant profitability would be 22 percent greater using the MDEA than using the menu engineering model.

Research limitations/implications

Because there are no publicly listed teppanyaki‐style restaurants in Taiwan and it is difficult to find the same menu in different restaurants, this study consists of only a single restaurant, and the results may not be generalizable to other types of restaurants.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to menu analysis by establishing an efficiency index and using financial performance as criteria for determining which menu items to improve in a teppanyaki‐style restaurant. The MTR of the metafrontier model can differentiate the proficiency level of the heterogeneous categories, such as à la carte and combo set menus. This paper offers empirical results pertaining to the classification of menu items and describes a slack‐based analysis for improving menu items.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 July 1996

Paul Morrison

Profiles the development of menu‐engineering models and, in particular, the movement supporting the quantification of all costs associated with the production of a menu

Abstract

Profiles the development of menu‐engineering models and, in particular, the movement supporting the quantification of all costs associated with the production of a menu item. Reports the findings of a study of upscale restaurant menu planners. While all menu planners adopted elements of menu engineering when planning menus, most rejected the opportunity to factor in non‐material direct costs as a major component of determining menu content and prices. In particular, individual dish labour cost was not considered an important menu‐planning criterion. Dishes which attracted low sales, but which planners felt added interest to the menu, were included on the menu. This supports the view of most advocates of quantitative menu analysis that the profitability of individual dishes on the menu is only one of several important criteria when designing the menu.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 October 2017

Eunha Jeong and SooCheong (Shawn) Jang

This study aims to investigate how restaurant customers’ heuristic judgment, originating from their perceived level of congruity between restaurant brand image regarding…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate how restaurant customers’ heuristic judgment, originating from their perceived level of congruity between restaurant brand image regarding healthfulness and healthy menu products, can affect their information processing in terms of their perceived nutritional information credibility and, furthermore, how these effects influence customers’ attitude toward the menu in terms of healthiness.

Design/methodology/approach

A Web-based survey was developed and distributed to randomly selected respondents in the USA, and in total, 320 responses were used for the data analyses. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to examine the relationship among three constructs: perceived brand–product congruity, perceived nutritional information credibility and nutrition attitude toward the healthy menu item being promoted. To assess the mediating role of perceived information credibility, an analytical procedure proposed by (Baron and Kenny 1986) was used. Finally, to investigate the moderating effect of the health involvement, multiple group analyses were executed.

Findings

The study results suggested that the synchronization between healthful brand image of the restaurant and the promoted menu item is important for ensuring customers’ perceptions of information credibility regarding the menu item healthiness and for eliciting customers’ positive nutrition attitudes toward the menu item. Also, positive nutrition attitudes toward a menu item can be increased by improving perceived information credibility. Depending on an individual’s level of health involvement, the relationships between the three proposed constructs vary.

Originality/value

This paper includes a theoretical model that explains customers’ heuristic evaluation of a healthy menu product by assessing the influence of brand image congruity in terms of healthy menu promotion.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 29 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 March 2012

Sunghyup Sean Hyun and Heesup Han

The purpose of this research is to create and test a model of a patron's innovativeness formation toward a chain restaurant brand.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to create and test a model of a patron's innovativeness formation toward a chain restaurant brand.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of the current literature revealed six key determinants in the formation of patrons' innovativeness in the chain restaurant context. Based on theoretical relationships between these constructs, a structural model was proposed. The model was tested utilizing data collected from 433 chain restaurant patrons.

Findings

Data analysis indicates that satisfaction and brand attitude positively influence innovativeness, with the impact mediated by advertising effectiveness and perceived risk in a new menu trial. Advertising effectiveness significantly reduced patrons' perceived risk in a new menu trial and thus positively influences innovativeness. Lastly, it was revealed that sales promotions have a strong impact on innovativeness.

Research limitations/implications

The findings emphasize the significance of study variables in the formation of patrons' innovativeness in the chain restaurant context. These findings help restaurant practitioners in successful new menu/food product launch.

Originality/value

This study is the first to explain the formation of patrons' innovativeness in the chain restaurant industry. Given that a proper understanding of innovativeness is critical to achieving chain restaurants' business success, the model verified in this study may serve as a guideline for practitioners/researchers in this field.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 July 1995

John T. Bowen and Anne J. Morris

Objectives of a menu include communication of the productsavailable for sale, providing tangible evidence and selling. Managersmust consider all these elements when they…

Abstract

Objectives of a menu include communication of the products available for sale, providing tangible evidence and selling. Managers must consider all these elements when they create a new menu. Focuses on menus as a sales tool in a full‐service restaurant. Describes an experiment to investigate the effectiveness of using menu design techniques to sell a specific menu item. Presents the experiment′s results and four propositions that relate to the effectiveness of the menu as a selling tool.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 2000