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Abstract

Details

Philosophy of Management and Sustainability: Rethinking Business Ethics and Social Responsibility in Sustainable Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-453-9

Article
Publication date: 8 November 2022

Austin Chia, Kim Doyle and Margaret L. Kern

Drawing upon a contractarian lens of corporate social responsibility (CSR), this study aims to explore community construals of happiness and evaluates conceptual…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing upon a contractarian lens of corporate social responsibility (CSR), this study aims to explore community construals of happiness and evaluates conceptual boundaries of CSR for happiness.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a mixed-methods design, natural language processing and thematic analysis techniques were used to analyse large volumes of textual survey data collected from over 1,000 research participants through an online survey.

Findings

Results indicated that lay construals of happiness were primarily defined in terms of socioeconomic conditions and psychoemotional experiences. In explicating the boundary conditions, community perceptions regarding the extent of businesses’ social responsibilities for happiness were evidenced in five themes: that businesses have a responsibility not to harm happiness, a responsibility to enable conditions for happiness to occur, a responsibility to exercise awareness of happiness implications in decision-making, a responsibility for happiness that is limited by strategic purpose and resource capability and a responsibility for happiness that is limited by stakeholder proximity.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the theoretical and empirical foundation of CSR for happiness while simultaneously developing and applying a novel approach for processing and analysing large volumes of qualitative survey-based data.

Details

Society and Business Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5680

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 September 2022

Emad Abu Eid and Ab Razak Che Hussin

This study aims to derive factors in the context of library corporate social responsibility. Interest in implementing corporate social responsibility has also increased…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to derive factors in the context of library corporate social responsibility. Interest in implementing corporate social responsibility has also increased over time because of its association with core issues of fundamental value, especially in societal, environmental and ethical practices. Therefore, corporate social responsibility can help libraries accomplish their missions and goals.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used data from 80 studies from the literature between 2010 and 2020 analysed and reviewed to identify the components of library corporate social responsibility. To establish library corporate social responsibility factors, thematic and weighting analyses were adopted and implemented.

Findings

The study established that library corporate social responsibility comprises four main themes: community, workplace and employees, environment, and stakeholders, which include the nine best predicted factors that play a significant role in library corporate social responsibility.

Practical implications

The results of this study provide implications for librarians and academics about libraries' social responsibility and its themes and factors.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors' knowledge, this study is the first to derive the factors of library corporate social responsibility. Hence, the importance of identifying library corporate social responsibility factors and component will help libraries implement the best practices of the modern concept of corporate social responsibility.

Article
Publication date: 20 July 2009

Christine Vize

The issue of responsibility and accountability is central to the development of New Ways of Working (NWW), and has also been central to the concerns that members of some…

Abstract

The issue of responsibility and accountability is central to the development of New Ways of Working (NWW), and has also been central to the concerns that members of some professions have expressed about it. Clarity about who is responsible for what, and who is accountable to whom, is particularly important when there are new types of worker roles in the team, and when existing workers are working in a different way or extending their role. NWW emphasises the appropriate distribution of responsibility and team decision‐making, which together are designed to promote patient safety. Distributing responsibility and accountability does not mean diluting or diffusing it; this model supports all workers being responsible for the standards of their own practice, and moves away from the ill‐defined, and perhaps unrealistic, notion of the doctor being ultimately responsible for all patients.The National Workforce Programme has worked with a wide range of stakeholders, including professional regulators and employers, to produce guidance on responsibility and accountability. This guidance is currently in draft form and will be published on the New Ways of Working website (www.newwaysofworking.org.uk) as soon as the final version is published.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 December 2004

Jenny Dawkins

An ever‐increasing number of companies are recognising the reputational risks and opportunities that corporate responsibility brings, and for these companies aligning…

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Abstract

An ever‐increasing number of companies are recognising the reputational risks and opportunities that corporate responsibility brings, and for these companies aligning corporate behaviour with stakeholder expectations is an ongoing business priority. Communication, however, often remains the missing link in the practice of corporate responsibility. The information requirements of a range of opinion leader and mass stakeholder audiences are not currently being satisfied by many companies, so they are not getting full credit for their responsible corporate behaviour. Of course, there are specific challenges in communicating corporate responsibility – including scepticism towards company messages and potentially hostile reactions from the media, campaign groups and others. The diverse information requirements of different stakeholder groups also present special communication challenges, and these requirements are examined in turn. Using MORI’s British opinion research to illustrate the case, this paper first examines communication to opinion leader audiences (such as legislators, business press, investors and non‐governmental organisations), and in particular the opportunities and limitations of the social report. It then goes on to address communication of corporate responsibility to the general public and the need to trigger wider consumer engagement in this topic. Lastly, it covers the communication opportunity presented by companies’ own employees and the internal communication challenges surrounding corporate responsibility. The paper suggests, in conclusion, that effective communication of corporate responsibility depends on a clear strategy which evaluates both the opportunities and the risks to the brand, and which tailors messages to different stakeholder groups. It calls for a coordinated approach, which ideally embeds corporate responsibility messages into mainstream communications. The paper also identifies internal communication as an under‐utilised and potentially powerful channel for enhancing a company’s reputation for responsibility among its key stakeholders.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 28 November 2022

Evan Bowness, Hannah Wittman, Annette Aurélie Desmarais, Colin Dring, Dana James, Angela McIntyre and Tabitha Robin Martens

This chapter considers the place of responsibility in confronting ecological sustainability and social equity problems in the food system. We present two illustrations…

Abstract

This chapter considers the place of responsibility in confronting ecological sustainability and social equity problems in the food system. We present two illustrations addressing the following question: In what ways does responsibility present a way to close the metabolic rift in line with the vision of the global food sovereignty movement? First, using the example of Metro-Vancouver in Canada, we consider the ways in which urban people claim responsibility for land protection through the concept of urban agrarianism, defined as an urban ethic of care for foodlands, with an associated responsibility to exercise solidarity with those who cultivate and harvest food. Second, we discuss how deepening relational responsibility in legal and regulatory frameworks might hold the corporate food regime accountable in the Canadian context to address their role in and responsibility for mitigating an increasingly risky world, as evidenced by the COVID-19 pandemic. We argue that the responsibility of urban people to mobilise in solidarity with food movements, and against the corporate food regime in particular, will play a critical role in supporting the transition to sustainable and just food systems. This applies both to finding new ways to claim responsibility for this transition and to hold those actors that have disproportionately benefitted from the corporate food regime responsible. Such a reworking of responsibility is especially necessary as the context for food systems change becomes increasingly urbanised and risky.

Details

Food and Agriculture in Urbanized Societies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-770-2

Keywords

Open Access
Book part
Publication date: 30 April 2019

S. J. Oswald A. J. Mascarenhas

Ethics is fundamentally a science of social and collective responsibility. Ethics concerns human behavior as responsible or accountable. Because of the nature of social…

Abstract

Executive Summary

Ethics is fundamentally a science of social and collective responsibility. Ethics concerns human behavior as responsible or accountable. Because of the nature of social interaction, certain members of the society will bear greater authority, and hence, greater individual and social responsibility than others. In our world, personal responsibility and social responsibility are hardly separable. Personal responsibility becomes responsibility for the world because the person and the world are inseparable. In this chapter, we use the term responsibility from a legal, ethical, moral, and spiritual (LEMS) standpoint as some promise, commitment, obligation, sanctioned by self, morals, law, or society, to do good, and if harm results, to repair harm done on another. Hence, responsibility from a moral perspective is trustworthiness and dependability of the agent in some enterprise. Its inverse is exoneration – the extent to which one is excused from commitment and repairing the harm done to others by one’s actions. We apply the theories and constructs of executive responsibility to two contemporary cases: (1) India’s Super Rich in 2014 and (2) the Fall and Rise of Starbucks. After exploring the basic notion of responsibility, we present a discussion on the nature and obligation of corporate responsibility into three parts: Part I: Classical Understanding and Discussion on Corporate Responsibility; Part II: Contemporary Understanding and Discussion on Corporate Responsibility, and Part III: A synthesis of classical and contemporary views of responsibility and their applications to corporate executive responsibility.

Details

Corporate Ethics for Turbulent Markets
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-192-2

Book part
Publication date: 11 July 2022

Protus Murunga

This chapter seeks to examine the concept of corporate social responsibility (CSR) in Kenya and evaluate whether the practices of CSR evidenced in Kenya resonates with the…

Abstract

This chapter seeks to examine the concept of corporate social responsibility (CSR) in Kenya and evaluate whether the practices of CSR evidenced in Kenya resonates with the needs and aspirations of the people or has been caricatured from the West. The chapter epistemologically examines CSR and tilts this approach to Kenya and how Kenyan indigenous organisations are practising it. There is no denying that the West has been significant in shaping the frameworks of the contemporary CSR agenda thus making its definition not African. It is important to realise that there is no homogeneity in terms of the needs and realities between developed and developing countries. In this regard, any attempts to homogenise the conceptualisation of CSR cannot hold water due to disparities in the cultural underpinnings. A common understanding in the scholarship on CSR is that it is culturally determined. Most multinational organisations operating in Africa have always practised the kind of CSR that mostly resonates with the West rather than Africa. The organisation’s mandate is not only to make profits but also to increase and strike a balance of the needs and interests of the stakeholders. Through desktop research, published scholarly articles were analysed and it was established that there is no African CSR. The one practised in Kenya and the other parts of the African continent is a caricature of the Global North which does not conform to the needs, realities, and expectations of Africans.

Details

Responsible Management in Africa, Volume 2: Ethical Work and Sustainability
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80382-494-9

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 July 2022

Aida Hanic and Edib Smolo

This study aims to present a corporate social responsibility (CSR) model that would apply to Islamic banks, considering the international aspect of social responsibility

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to present a corporate social responsibility (CSR) model that would apply to Islamic banks, considering the international aspect of social responsibility because CSR is not applicable in the same way in all types of societies.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the extensive review of the existing literature, the authors aim to present an Islamic CSR model applicable to Islamic banks. This study is based on the international approach to CSR developed by Masoud (2017). Each responsibility has an equal share but with specific changes regarding the order of priorities between them and the type of responsibility.

Findings

The findings show that the existing literature provides several Islamic CSR models. Most of these models are general and offer guidelines to Islamic financial institutions, but no model applies exclusively to Islamic banks. Using these models for Islamic banks is challenging because of their specific business activities, especially in non-Muslim countries. This study proposes a model that could act as the main guideline for Islamic banks with enough flexibility to meet different market and stakeholders’ requirements.

Practical implications

The model was not tested on a sample, and not all Islamic principles were considered. However, it is applicable for Islamic banks, especially considering internationalization in their businesses and the further development of Islamic banking. At the same time, this model puts ethical norms in the spotlight. This is particularly emphasized in the case of non-Muslim countries or in societies where a particular law does not regulate Islamic bank activities.

Originality/value

Although there is a growing literature on this topic, existing studies primarily discuss the Islamic approach to CSR from the overall perspective, not in a specific industry. While some authors developed their own Islamic CSR models relying on the primary Shariah sources, others base their proposals on other classical CSR ideas. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study based on the CSR model developed by Masoud (2017), considering the relationship between economics and religion and the implications of the Islamic moral economy.

Details

International Journal of Islamic and Middle Eastern Finance and Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8394

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 14 September 2018

Nojeem Amodu

An efficient corporate social responsibility (CSR) framework in many economies has been linked with human capital development, social and financial inclusion…

Abstract

An efficient corporate social responsibility (CSR) framework in many economies has been linked with human capital development, social and financial inclusion, environmental protection and better stakeholder management. This article examines the level of efficiency of the CSR framework in Nigeria; it underscores the developmental potentials of CSR practices within the Nigerian business community. However, a prevailing trend of haphazard and sometimes dodgy CSR practices by free riding rogue companies mars such potentials. Underpinning these dodgy practices has been a CSR ‘business case’ argument coupled with dysfunctional business (corporate) law assumptions among other causative factors. The article appraises the implications of these causative factors and towards minimising the haphazard practices, proposes corporate law reforms through which the Nigerian CSR framework may become more effective.

Details

Stakeholders, Governance and Responsibility
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-380-3

Keywords

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