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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Nuran Acur and Umit Bititci

The aim of the paper is to demonstrate how business process‐based approach (PROPHESY) facilitates integration of resource‐based and market‐based approaches to strategy…

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5689

Abstract

The aim of the paper is to demonstrate how business process‐based approach (PROPHESY) facilitates integration of resource‐based and market‐based approaches to strategy management. The paper begins by presenting resource‐based and market‐based strategy management approaches generally. It extends earlier research by examining the linkages between markets and resources as practised by three case study companies representing a cross‐section of the manufacturing industry. It continues with a discussion on the reasons behind the choice of the criteria used for cross case analysis. Although the results are exploratory, they provide a comparative analysis of how market‐based strategies could relate and integrate with resource‐based strategies through business processes.

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International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 3 September 2020

James M. Crick

Earlier work has suggested that assumptions, values and beliefs about the importance of cooperating with competitors (a coopetition-oriented mindset) should manifest into…

Abstract

Purpose

Earlier work has suggested that assumptions, values and beliefs about the importance of cooperating with competitors (a coopetition-oriented mindset) should manifest into behavioural forms of coopetition, such as resource and capability-sharing activities. Yet, limited research surrounds the complexities of this link. The purpose of this study is to unpack the relationship between a coopetition-oriented mindset and coopetition-oriented behaviours under the moderating roles of industry experience and degree of internationalization, guided by resource-based theory and the relational view.

Design/methodology/approach

The chosen empirical context was the Canadian wine industry because wine producers are often involved in coopetition strategies and have varying degrees of internationalisation. Preliminary interview data were collected from 18 managers to shape the operationalisations. Then survey data were collected from 195 Canadian wine producers. After checking the statistical data for all major assessments of reliability and validity (together with common method variance), the hypothesised and control paths were tested through hierarchical regression.

Findings

A coopetition-oriented mindset had a positive and significant association with coopetition-oriented behaviours. Surprisingly, this link was negatively moderated by industry experience. Additionally, degree of internationalisation yielded a positive moderation effect. These moderators highlight situations where a coopetition-oriented mindset is (and is not) likely to manifest into coopetition activities.

Practical implications

If firms aim to engage in behavioural forms of coopetition, they should manage assumptions, values and beliefs associated with the advantages of collaborating with their competitors. Industry experience can limit the extent to which business’ coopetition-oriented mindsets manifest into coopetition-oriented behaviours. This could be explained by decision makers possessing information that discourages them from working with certain (untrustworthy) rivals because of the potential harmful effects on their performance. Companies should use their industry experience to avoid working with rival entities that will create negative outcomes, such as tensions (e.g., conflict, power imbalances and opportunistic behaviours), lost intellectual property and diluted competitive advantages. Nonetheless, industry experience might signify that there are more risks than rewards linked with these business-to-business marketing strategies. Higher levels of internationalisation can help firms to recognise that coopetition-oriented behaviours may lead to performance-enhancing opportunities in their overseas markets.

Originality/value

This investigation contributes to the business-to-business marketing literature with new evidence on how organisations can foster a coopetition-oriented mindset to engage in coopetition strategies. The negative moderation effect from industry experience highlights that knowledge of competitors’ activities can limit the extent to which coopetition-oriented behaviours are implemented. Moreover, the positive interaction effect from degree of internationalisation extends the growing body of knowledge pertaining to coopetition in an international arena. Collectively, these results show that while a coopetition-oriented mindset is a critical driver of coopetition-oriented behaviours, there are certain contingencies that can strengthen or weaken this association. Finally, by integrating resource-based theory and the relational view, this paper could explore the different forms of coopetition, in terms of organisation-wide mindsets and firm-level behaviours. This paper concludes with some managerial recommendations, alongside a series of limitations and avenues for future research.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 36 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

Ioannis E. Nikolaou, Konstantinos P. Tsagarakis and Kyriaki Tasopoulou

The purpose of this paper is to address two research questions: which are the key factors that stimulate entrepreneurs to invest in ecopreneurship, and how ecopreneurhsip…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address two research questions: which are the key factors that stimulate entrepreneurs to invest in ecopreneurship, and how ecopreneurhsip contributes to environmental sustainability.

Design/methodology/approach

To answer these questions, a framework has been developed to identify the incentives that lead entrepreneurs to invest in firms in the ecopreneurship through institutional and resource-based thinking.

Findings

From a survey of 91 Greek firms from the green service sector, it is shown that some specific institutional and resource-based view factors play a critical role in green entrepreneurs’ decisions, as well as some certain environmental practices that are frequently used by entrepreneurs to address environmental issues.

Research limitations/implications

First, the answer of the second research question through data collected by a questionnaire survey may be faced with skepticism by some authors, as it could be seen that entrepreneurs and managers of firms could have overstated their company's environmental activities. Second, although the sample selection of 91 firms is a representative sample (response rate 12.35 percent) of the total population of Greek green firms (761) and equal to other relative studies, a higher number of firms and a wider variety of green entrepreneurship ventures is necessary in future research.

Practical implications

The findings are useful for scholars, practitioners and policy makers since it provide information regarding the behavior of green entrepreneurs.

Originality/value

The paper analyze the types of green entrepreneurs in relation to the different features and strategies which are emerged from two theories, such as institutional and resource-based theory.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

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Article
Publication date: 15 May 2017

Yevgen Bogodistov and Veit Wohlgemuth

The purpose of this study is to enhance the existing enterprise risk-management (ERM) theory by introducing both a resource-based view and a dynamic capability…

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3701

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to enhance the existing enterprise risk-management (ERM) theory by introducing both a resource-based view and a dynamic capability perspective. These strategic management concepts might resolve several theoretical shortcomings in the field of risk management. The concept of risk-management capabilities is proposed as an explanation of a firm’s risk resilience.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is conceptual in nature. For illustrative purposes, the paper refers to practical examples.

Findings

First, the resource-based view provides a framework that helps to set priorities in risk management. Second, the dynamic capability perspective illustrates how firms can handle unforeseen events. Third, it is proposed that dynamic capabilities are needed to allow a constant reassessment of the impact of specific resources and, consequently, of ERM priorities. Fourth, a risk-management capability, as an integral part of a dynamic capability, allows firms to develop risk resilience in turbulent environments.

Research limitations/implications

This paper develops an enhanced framework for ERM within specific boundary conditions. It shows how priorities at the strategic level are to be set, and how these priorities influence the operational level of risk management.

Practical implications

The framework provides clear guidelines on setting priorities in ERM and implementing a risk-management process within firms.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the theoretical literature on ERM by enhancing it through a new framework. The resource-based view and dynamic capability perspective benefit through insights from risk-management literature.

Details

The Journal of Risk Finance, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1526-5943

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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2016

Debadutta Panda and Sriharsha Reddy

– The purpose of this paper is to understand the influence of internal resource drivers on internationalization of commercial banks.

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1340

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the influence of internal resource drivers on internationalization of commercial banks.

Design/methodology/approach

Panel data on 46 Indian commercial banks from 2008 to 2012 were collected from secondary sources to measure how assets size, human resources, branding and advertising, ownership and age influence the international diversification of the commercial bank. Internationalization of the commercial bank was measured in terms of international advances intensity, international borrowing intensity and number of countries served. Regression models were designed with controlled multicolinearity, heterogeneity and exogeneity.

Findings

Higher assets’ size, higher human resources, private ownership and higher organizational age led to internationalization of Indian commercial banks. However, higher branding and advertisement expenses and state ownership were found to be negatively related to international diversification.

Originality/value

Internationalization is one of the growth strategies of a firm which cannot be unified and generalized due to resource heterogeneity. So this necessitates a large number of studies sector-wise, sub-sector-wise, product-wise, industry-wise and region-wise. There is a dearth of literature on resource view of internationalization of commercial banks. So, this Indian study adds a new finding on resource-based view of internationalization to the existing body of knowledge.

Details

Journal of Asia Business Studies, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1558-7894

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Book part
Publication date: 20 June 2005

Sigrid De Wever, Annouk Lievens, Rudy Martens and Koen Vandenbempt

This paper reports on a case study research regarding the development of capabilities from a multidimensional social capital perspective. Case study research together with…

Abstract

This paper reports on a case study research regarding the development of capabilities from a multidimensional social capital perspective. Case study research together with a multi-disciplinary literature study are the platform for further theory development on the related questions: “How do organisations build capabilities?” and “What are the antecedents of the development of capabilities?.” We start by describing the theoretical origin of our research problem by focusing on a triangle: (1) the resource-based view; (2) the network approach; and (3) the social capital approach. Following this literature study, we discuss the case study research design that was developed within an industrial company (B2B). We next present the findings and refine our initial tentative conceptual framework.

Details

Competence Perspectives on Managing Interfirm Interactions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-169-9

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Article
Publication date: 4 October 2019

James M. Crick

Coopetition is the interplay between cooperation and competition, involving organisations sharing resources and capabilities with rival entities. Earlier work has…

Abstract

Purpose

Coopetition is the interplay between cooperation and competition, involving organisations sharing resources and capabilities with rival entities. Earlier work has suggested that coopetition has a linear (positive) relationship with company performance, with scarce considerations towards whether this link could have a diminishing-returns effect. Thus, this paper aims to examine the non-linear (quadratic) relationships between coopetition and three performance outcomes. Using resource-based theory and the relational view, this study is designed to evaluate the dark side of coopetition, in terms of identifying situations when such activities can be harmful for company performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were collected from a sample of 101 vineyards and wineries in New Zealand. After purifying the measures through a series of multivariate statistical techniques, the research hypotheses and control paths were tested through hierarchical regression. Furthermore, the statistical data passed all major assessments of reliability and validity (including common method variance).

Findings

Coopetition was found to have non-linear (quadratic) relationships with customer satisfaction performance, market performance, and financial performance. These results indicate that while coopetition provides organisations with new resources, capabilities and opportunities, there are some dark sides of coopetition activities. With “too little” coopetition, firms might struggle to survive within their markets, with an insufficient volume of resources and capabilities. With “too much” coopetition, companies could experience increased tensions, potentially lose intellectual property and dilute their competitive advantages. Such negative outcomes could harm their performance in several capacities.

Practical implications

Firms should appreciate that coopetition is a competitive strategy. In other words, regardless of how much collaboration occurs, coopetition partners are still competing entities. It is recommended that organisations should strive to engage in an “optimal-level” of coopetition, as “too little” or “too much” of such strategies can be harmful for various types of company performance. To mitigate some of the dark sides of coopetition, businesses should attempt to use all the benefits of collaborating with competitors (i.e. accessing new resources, capabilities and opportunities), but at the same time, not become dependent on rivals’ assets.

Originality/value

This paper develops and tests a framework examining the non-linear (quadratic) linkages between coopetition and multiple assessments of company performance. It highlights the benefits and drawbacks of businesses sharing resources and capabilities with their competitors. Contrary to prior studies in the business-to-business marketing literature, the results signify that firms need to engage in an “optimal-level” of coopetition to minimise certain dark sides, such as reduced company performance. After providing some practitioner implications, this paper ends with a series of limitations and avenues for future research.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 35 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2003

Robert H. Lowson

To date, the exact nature and classification of an operations strategy vis‐à‐vis other popular operational solutions have eluded many commentators. Against a background of…

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7441

Abstract

To date, the exact nature and classification of an operations strategy vis‐à‐vis other popular operational solutions have eluded many commentators. Against a background of the various approaches to strategy formulation, including the resource‐based and market‐driven views, the composition of an operations strategy is discussed in terms of the decisions involved. Research findings conclude that such strategies contain diverse building‐blocks initially reflecting various resources, capabilities and competencies. However, their composition and subsequent interconnections are also influenced by the exigencies of the market and other supply network forces. Finally, the work debates how these strategies and their components can be customised to reflect different competitive agendas. This latter aspect breaks new ground, takes the study beyond mere definitions, and has clear implications for both practice and further research.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 41 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2019

James M. Crick

The purpose of this paper is to examine the moderating factors that could affect the relationship between coopetition (the interplay between cooperation and competition…

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1076

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the moderating factors that could affect the relationship between coopetition (the interplay between cooperation and competition) and company performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Under the relational view and resource-based theory, key articles surrounding coopetition were reviewed. A conceptual framework (with six research propositions) was developed to understand the nature of the relationship between coopetition and company performance.

Findings

While the coopetition – company performance relationship has been well-studied, this link could be moderated by the competitive business environment, organizational resources and capabilities, and trust between rivals. Further, most authors have explored the linear relationship between coopetition and company performance; however, in this paper, the non-linear (inverted U-shaped) link is also conceptualized, whereby firms might experience “too little” and “too much” coopetition in their business strategies.

Practical implications

Management teams should engage in an “optimal-level” of coopetition by sharing resources and capabilities with rival firms, but not to the extent where they depend on such competitors. If firms rarely collaborate with their competitors, they risk not being able to achieve their performance objectives. Likewise, if businesses engage in excessive degrees of coopetition, there could be tensions between the rival companies involved. Also, practitioners should be aware of the factors that can improve or reduce their performance when they implement coopetition activities. By taking: the competitive business environment, organizational resources and capabilities, and trust between rivals into consideration, the themes of this paper should be used to help managers to maximize company performance (considered in multiple capacities).

Originality/value

This paper is used to help scholars and practitioners to understand the factors that could help or hinder the performance outcomes of coopetition activities. By appreciating the moderating roles of the competitive business environment, organizational resources and capabilities, and trust between rivals, managers are anticipated to provide themselves with scope to alter their coopetition activities to improve their performance. This article ends with a series of managerial implications, alongside some limitations and avenues for future research.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 15 October 2020

James M. Crick and Dave Crick

Small sports clubs are the life-blood of particular communities, even though many are under-resourced and have difficulties in operating under an individualistic business…

Abstract

Purpose

Small sports clubs are the life-blood of particular communities, even though many are under-resourced and have difficulties in operating under an individualistic business model. Although coopetition (simultaneous cooperation and competition) has been recognised as a positive driver of performance, the complexities of this association remain under-researched. Consequently, grounded in resource-based theory and the relational view, the purpose of this current study is to examine the moderating roles of inter-firm conflict and competitive intensity in the coopetition–sales performance relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

After undertaking 25 field interviews, survey data were collected from 151 non-mainstream sporting clubs in New Zealand. This setting was ideal, since it hosts high-degrees of cooperativeness and competitiveness. After assessing the statistical data for all major robustness checks (including common method variance and endogeneity bias), the hypothesised and control paths were tested through a hierarchical regression analysis.

Findings

Coopetition had a positive relationship with sales performance, but inter-firm conflict yielded a negative interaction effect. Surprisingly, this link was positively moderated by competitive intensity.

Practical implications

Under-resourced entrepreneurs (like those in many small sports clubs) should consider cooperating with their competitors, as these strategies can assist them to improve their sales performance. However, they should be careful when engaging in such activities due to the considerable risk that rival firms could behave opportunistically, which might harm their performance. That being said, owner-managers are advantaged if they operate in sectors where there are lots of competitors because there is increased scope to collaborate with “complementary” and trustworthy rivals that can help them to achieve mutually-beneficial outcomes. Indeed, sporting governing bodies (including those that operate on a non-profit basis) should encourage their members to engage in coopetition due to these positive financial consequences.

Originality/value

This investigation contributes to the extant literature by evaluating the competitive forces affecting the link between coopetition and sales performance. Specifically, new evidence emerges on the circumstances where coopetition is (and is not) a performance-enhancing entrepreneurial strategy. Further, this investigation provides unique insights regarding coopetition among non-mainstream sporting clubs, adding new knowledge to the sports entrepreneurship literature. Moreover, by infusing resource-based theory with the relational view, stronger arguments feature how owner-managers can navigate the paradoxical forces that drive coopetition activities. This study ends with several practitioner implications, alongside a series of limitations and avenues for future research.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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