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Book part
Publication date: 20 October 2015

Michael Preece

This research explores perceptions of knowledge management processes held by managers and employees in a service industry. To date, empirical research on knowledge…

Abstract

This research explores perceptions of knowledge management processes held by managers and employees in a service industry. To date, empirical research on knowledge management in the service industry is sparse. This research seeks to examine absorptive capacity and its four capabilities of acquisition, assimilation, transformation and exploitation and their impact on effective knowledge management. All of these capabilities are strategies that enable external knowledge to be recognized, imported and integrated into, and further developed within the organization effectively. The research tests the relationships between absorptive capacity and effective knowledge management through analysis of quantitative data (n = 549) drawn from managers and employees in 35 residential aged care organizations in Western Australia. Responses were analysed using Partial Least Square-based Structural Equation Modelling. Additional analysis was conducted to assess if the job role (of manager or employee) and three industry context variables of profit motive, size of business and length of time the organization has been in business, impacted on the hypothesized relationships.

Structural model analysis examines the relationships between variables as hypothesized in the research framework. Analysis found that absorptive capacity and the four capabilities correlated significantly with effective knowledge management, with absorptive capacity explaining 56% of the total variability for effective knowledge management. Findings from this research also show that absorptive capacity and the four capabilities provide a useful framework for examining knowledge management in the service industry. Additionally, there were no significant differences in the perceptions held between managers and employees, nor between respondents in for-profit and not-for-profit organizations. Furthermore, the size of the organization and length of time the organization has been in business did not impact on absorptive capacity, the four capabilities and effective knowledge management.

The research considers implications for business in light of these findings. The role of managers in providing leadership across the knowledge management process was confirmed, as well as the importance of guiding routines and knowledge sharing throughout the organization. Further, the results indicate that within the participating organizations there are discernible differences in the way that some organizations manage their knowledge, compared to others. To achieve effective knowledge management, managers need to provide a supportive workplace culture, facilitate strong employee relationships, encourage employees to seek out new knowledge, continually engage in two-way communication with employees and provide up-to-date policies and procedures that guide employees in doing their work. The implementation of knowledge management strategies has also been shown in this research to enhance the delivery and quality of residential aged care.

Details

Sustaining Competitive Advantage Via Business Intelligence, Knowledge Management, and System Dynamics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-707-3

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2007

Graham McPheat, Ian Milligan and Lynne Hunter

In Scotland residential units for children remain largely in the hands of local authorities. A reluctance to plan for and use such services as a positive choice results in…

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Abstract

In Scotland residential units for children remain largely in the hands of local authorities. A reluctance to plan for and use such services as a positive choice results in many children being placed as a last resort. Two research studies gathered data over a six‐month period and considered seven local authorities' admissions to children's units, allowing for in‐depth exploration of the manner in which children are being placed in residential care. The studies revealed a significant number of children aged under 12 being admitted to residential care, many placements of a very short duration, poor evidence of placement planning, substantial numbers of sibling groups being separated and admitted to different residential care settings and many instances of residential placements being used when not the preferred option. The implications of the findings are discussed and possible solutions offered as to how the residential sector can be developed to achieve the wide range of roles it is currently expected to fulfil.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

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Article
Publication date: 28 January 2022

Marianne Buen Sommerfeldt

A residential care is home for children who live there and is simultaneously a workplace for employees aiming to safeguard the needs and development of children. Studies…

Abstract

Purpose

A residential care is home for children who live there and is simultaneously a workplace for employees aiming to safeguard the needs and development of children. Studies have shown that adolescents’ descriptions of life in residential care are connected to feelings of otherness and deviance. The purpose of this study is to explore how adolescents in residential care in Norway relate residential care as a home to their experiences of everyday life in this context and to their relationships with the employees.

Design/methodology/approach

This study draws on individual, qualitative interviews with 19 boys and girls (aged 15–18 years) living in residential care homes in Norway. The interviews explored their narratives of everyday life in residential care. The adolescents were encouraged to tell about yesterday and were asked follow-up questions regarding everything that had occurred during encounters with employees. The Norwegian Center for Research Data approved the study.

Findings

The analysis shows tensions in the adolescents’ accounts between the institution as an abnormal context and their own subject position as normal. By drawing upon the terms “stigma” and “recognition” in the analysis, the study shows how recognising relationships between the youth and staff decreases the potential to experience stigma.

Originality/value

This study contributes to existing knowledge on social work in residential care. The paper shows how the institutional framework and employees’ practices impact adolescents’ self-understanding and their experiences of residential care as a home.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2009

Roger Bullock

In the desire to improve outcomes for children in care, the issue of those individuals placed by local authorities in residential establishments run by external agencies…

Abstract

In the desire to improve outcomes for children in care, the issue of those individuals placed by local authorities in residential establishments run by external agencies has become especially salient. In addition to questions of quality and value for money, there are concerns about children becoming detached from local services, especially as many of the placements selected are outside the local authorities' geographical boundaries. This study looks at 262 children so placed in eight English local authorities. It was found that although there were common presenting problems, such as a need for specialist therapy or to reduce difficult behaviour, the children's circumstances varied and four distinct groups of children with common needs were identified. The use of such placements also varied across the authorities and did not mirror their numbers of children in care. The factors associated with the use of externally purchased residential placements and differences between those placed internally and externally are explored. A framework for developing new approaches for difficult adolescents and suggestions about fruitful service development are offered.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

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Article
Publication date: 26 August 2010

Deidre Wild, Sara Nelson and Ala Szczepura

A three‐year in‐depth study has examined three models to improvecare in residential homes for older people in England. The study showed that each aimed to provide a ‘home…

Abstract

A three‐year in‐depth study has examined three models to improvecare in residential homes for older people in England. The study showed that each aimed to provide a ‘home for life’ for residents. Using multi‐source data gained from a range of qualitative and quantitative methods involving residential home managers, care staff and extensive review of documentation related to key care functions, inhibitors and enhancers to the achievement of this aim were identified. Inhibitors were lack of available top‐up funding to meet increased care needs, care staff's inadequate knowledge of behaviour‐disordered residents, workload, cross‐sector barriers and environmental problems. Among the enhancers were flexible regulation, up‐skilling of care staff, care staff's achievement in palliative care, perceived avoidance of hospital admission, and sound practice‐led relationships with nurses. The implications for practice are of relevance to policy makers, educators, community health and social care professionals, and older residents, their relatives and representative organisations.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Abstract

Details

Modelling Our Future: Population Ageing, Health and Aged Care
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-808-7

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Julia Styles

Wherever elderly individuals with diabetes reside, whether at home, in a residential home or in a nursing home, they deserve to have good‐quality, structured care provided…

Abstract

Wherever elderly individuals with diabetes reside, whether at home, in a residential home or in a nursing home, they deserve to have good‐quality, structured care provided by carers who have the relevant knowledge and skills. In order to achieve this carers need ongoing education and training. The evidence suggests that diabetes care in residential and nursing homes is varied and standards need to be improved. The literature points to education and training for care home staff as a central tenet to increasing the quality of diabetes care. This article reports the outcome of a collaborative approach to diabetes education and demonstrates that increased awareness in diabetes care is actively sought by staff working in residential and nursing homes. The teaching sessions reported were positively evaluated and demonstrated an increase in the knowledge of the participants. It is envisaged that this will be reflected in improved quality of diabetes care for elderly people. The author discusses the need to ensure that education and training is ongoing and recommends that policy makers, both at a national and local level, embrace the evidence and facilitate this process.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1999

Rachel Fleishman, Gabriella Heilbrun, Jenny Mandelson and Vicky Shirazi

This article describes actual UI prevalence and quality of care at Israeli LTC institutions for the elderly. The analysis is based on current regulatory data on 14,406…

Abstract

This article describes actual UI prevalence and quality of care at Israeli LTC institutions for the elderly. The analysis is based on current regulatory data on 14,406 residents at 196 residential homes, and 8,278 patients at 159 hospitals for the chronically ill. It includes a calculation of summary indices of quality, the percentage of institutions with deficient items and of those showing change, and a description of functional status profiles. Multiple regression explains the deficiency rate variance through independent institutional variables. There is a higher prevalence of severe functional impairment and full incontinence at hospitals for the chronically ill than at residential homes. There were higher rates of deficiencies and lower rates of corrections for structural items than for process items at both. A major improvement occurred for process items (50‐100 per cent). Regarding outcomes, 34 percent of the residents with UI during the first assessment were continent two years later.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Linda Garvican and Graham Bickler

In view of the decline in the number of residential and nursing homes over the last few years, East Sussex, Brighton and Hove Health Authority was concerned about optimum…

Abstract

In view of the decline in the number of residential and nursing homes over the last few years, East Sussex, Brighton and Hove Health Authority was concerned about optimum usage of places. This project aimed to ascertain the views of home owners and managers on their working relationship with the health authority, local hospitals and social services.Respondents felt that the incoming residents were generally frailer and more dependent than a few years ago, funding allocations were inadequate, given the standards now expected of care homes, and there were delays of up to a year in reaching agreement. Several indicated that they would no longer take publicly funded clients unless the families could top up the payments. Ten percent of the private residential homes surveyed were for sale or due to close. Between 40 and 50 older people were estimated to be awaiting transfer to EMI or nursing homes in East Sussex. Over 35% of homes complained about inappropriate discharges of their residents from hospital, and a poor standard of nursing care. Communication with hospitals was poor and relationships with the health authority and social services needed strengthening. Routine admissions were appropriate, but hospital discharges may have been premature. Home owners/managers were dissatisfied with their relationship with the NHS. Improvements are needed if partnership working is to be developed.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2008

Lori Weeks

This research examined how moving to a residential care home, a specific form of long‐term care facility, influences the quality of the relationship between seniors and…

Abstract

This research examined how moving to a residential care home, a specific form of long‐term care facility, influences the quality of the relationship between seniors and their family members and how policies in these homes can facilitate relationships between residents and their family members. In this exploratory study, a total of five non‐spousal family members participated in a focus group discussion, and an additional 10 family members participated in face‐to‐face interviews. The two main themes that emerged identified that admission to a long‐term care facility had no influence on family relationships, or it had a positive influence on family relationships. The respondents identified how policies in the home can maintain or enhance family relationships. In particular, they appreciated very flexible policies that included few restrictions on when and where they could interact with their relatives and appreciated facilities providing private spaces to accommodate family interaction. The results of this study, and future research, will aid administrators in long‐term care facilities to develop policies that most support and enhance the experience of seniors and their ongoing relationship with their family members.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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