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Article
Publication date: 26 August 2014

Rebecca Lindberg, Mark Lawrence, Lisa Gold and Sharon Friel

Food rescue is used in the emergency food sector internationally to reduce waste and improve food supplies to frontline providers and their clients. The purpose of this…

Abstract

Purpose

Food rescue is used in the emergency food sector internationally to reduce waste and improve food supplies to frontline providers and their clients. The purpose of this paper is to provide a perspective on why and how food rescue occurs in Australia. It also examines food rescue as a potential evolution within the emergency food setting.

Design/methodology/approach

A descriptive study of SecondBite, an Australian food rescue organisation, was conducted. Documents were reviewed, 14 weeks of participant observation occurred, and two focus group discussions were held. Framing analysis was used to design the research questions (why rescue food? and how?). The description of the organisation was then examined against critical literature to establish how food rescue conforms to and/or challenges the traditional limitations of emergency food.

Findings

Food rescue requires multiple resources within the emergency food space including surplus food, funding and labour. The frames used to justify this work provide an insight into the “problem” of food poverty in Australia and the “solution” of food rescue. The script for “people in need” requiring “fresh food” is well developed by SecondBite, with some tension around food waste reduction as a competing and yet complementary mission.

Originality/value

In light of the growing role of the not for profit sector in a “big society” political order, the rescuing of nutritious food for emergency parcels and meals, may provide some benefits for people already using emergency food. The opportunity for food rescue organisations to play a role in food poverty prevention requires further attention.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 116 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 21 June 2013

Shuo‐Yan Chou and Dayjian Chen

This study is an inquiry into practical solutions in the field of emergent disaster rescue methods and prevention management, and it focuses on planning, real‐time rescue

Abstract

Purpose

This study is an inquiry into practical solutions in the field of emergent disaster rescue methods and prevention management, and it focuses on planning, real‐time rescue, and emergency management. This study is a conventional writing style. Thus, the purpose of this study is to offer methods for governor reducing disaster losses in terms of human life and livelihoods.

Design/methodology/approach

The government should establish permanent disaster recovery institutions, such as disaster recovery coordinators, resource distributors at the provincial or state level, and nodes in districts to manage supplies, rescue activities. During the preparation stage of disaster responses, government offices must prepare the rescue plans and policies for future disasters, as well as create the documents for establishing part‐time civilian and volunteer agreements.

Findings

Even though residents suffer tremendous losses in terms of human life, regional administrators are usually and poorly organized at the preparation stage.

Practical implications

Disaster rescue activities depend heavily on civilians and organizations. A disaster rescue manager plays a key role, because he or she has received training in and has become familiar with emergent rescue operations.

Originality/value

Disaster rescue management is a valuable topic because it is a globally significant challenge to safeguard people's lives. A complex disaster of earthquakes and tsunamis occurring can give rise to nuclear radiation damage, for example, that occurred in Japan on March 11, 2011, is an illustrative case.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article
Publication date: 17 September 2019

Grzegorz Kunikowski, Anna Kosieradzka and Urszula Kąkol

The purpose of this paper is to present a proposal for the methodology of developing rescue plans and the concepts of applying recommended response schedules in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a proposal for the methodology of developing rescue plans and the concepts of applying recommended response schedules in the context of the State Fire Service’s planning responsibilities (preparation) and public administration (reconciliation and approval), according to the legal order in force in Poland. In the proposed concept, recommended schedules are built on the basis of the matches and successes identified according to the criteria, i.e. the best carried out rescue actions from the register of reports.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on the analysis of existing legal status and policy in Poland as well as the selected relevant academic literature.

Findings

The result is the formulation of a methodology for drawing up the rescue plans to the extent required by law and proposing a concept for the method of developing and applying recommended response schedules, supporting operational planning and conducting rescue operations.

Practical implications

The proposed methodology is to support the procedure of drawing up rescue plans by implying and implementing them into IT solutions. The suggested recommended response schedules, based on observations and conclusions from the analysis of the past rescue operations, may present circumstances and sequences of the use of forces and measures that have had beneficial effects in the past. An in-depth analysis of historical data from the conducted rescue operations may also be used to determine time indicators for the response phase.

Originality/value

The proposed solutions complement the methods currently used by public administration in Poland. The concept can also be inspiring for the State Fire Service (PSP) which has its own analytical tools in the form of a decision support system and registers of rescue operations carried out. The PSP may undertake the practical verification of the presented methodology for preparing rescue plans and recommended response schedules.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article
Publication date: 5 December 2016

Miranda Mirosa, Louise Mainvil, Hayley Horne and Ella Mangan-Walker

The purpose of this paper is to explore the social value food rescue enterprises can create for both their stakeholders and the wider community “in the meantime” whilst…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the social value food rescue enterprises can create for both their stakeholders and the wider community “in the meantime” whilst longer term solutions to the problems of insecurity and waste are sought.

Design/methodology/approach

FoodShare, a New Zealand urban-based social enterprise specialising in food redistribution, served as a case study for this research. Semi-structured interviews (n=13) were conducted with FoodShare staff and key stakeholder groups (food donors, financial donors, recipient agencies and volunteers). In addition, an anonymous online survey (n=40) was completed by the wider organisational volunteer network. The interview guides were structured around a new social value evaluation tool, Social Return on Investment, which is increasingly used to demonstrate the impact of such programmes. Deductive methods were used to code the resulting transcripts to identify key outcomes experienced by FoodShare’s stakeholders.

Findings

The outcomes of FoodShare’s work differed for the various stakeholders. For food donors, outcomes included “more involved relationships with community”, and “improved perceptions of corporate social responsibility”. Identified key outcomes for the financial donors included “key promotional opportunity” and “do something good”. For recipient agencies, important outcomes were “greater volume of food” and “increased reach”. Volunteers reported “meeting new people”, “a sense of accomplishment in helping others” and “learning new skills”. There were also a number of nutritional and environmental outcomes for the wider community.

Originality/value

Given the dearth of evidence on the societal value that is created in redistributing unsold food to people in need, this novel perspective makes a significant contribution to the literature in this area.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 118 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2006

Misa Sjöberg, Claes Wallenius and Gerry Larsson

To develop a theoretical understanding of leadership in stressful, complex rescue operations.

Abstract

Purpose

To develop a theoretical understanding of leadership in stressful, complex rescue operations.

Design/methodology/approach

A grounded theory approach was used. Twenty rescue operation commanders from four complex rescue operations in Sweden were interviewed.

Findings

A model was developed which suggests that leadership in stressful, complex rescue operations can be understood as a causal process consisting of three broad time‐related categories. The pre‐operation everyday working conditions affect the leadership during rescue operations, which in turn affects the post‐operation everyday working conditions, etc. Everyday working conditions include training and exercises, previous mission experiences, personal knowledge of co‐actors, and organisational climate. The leadership during a complex rescue operation is affected by the leader's appraisal of the balance between what is at stake, human lives in particular, and the manageability of the situation. Patterns of stress reactions among rescue commanders and their leadership behaviour and managerial routines, were identified. Three problem areas were noted: role shifts during long‐lasting operations, staff work, and practical routines. The post‐operation conditions include the leader's evaluation of the outcome, organisational climate, and post‐event stress reactions.

Research limitations/implication

Small sample, lack of representativeness, and lack of illumination of possible gender‐related aspects.

Practical implications

The model may be valuable in training and exercises with rescue operation commanders.

Originality/value

A new integrative, theoretical process model of leadership in complex, stressful rescue operations.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article
Publication date: 27 April 2010

Ali Unlu, Naim Kapucu and Bahadir Sahin

Crisis management has gained importance in the policy agendas of many countries around the world due to the increases in the number of natural disasters and terrorist…

Abstract

Purpose

Crisis management has gained importance in the policy agendas of many countries around the world due to the increases in the number of natural disasters and terrorist attacks. Thus, this paper has two purposes. The first is to illustrate how the Turkish Government's Disaster and Crisis Management System has been developed. The second purpose is to make a qualitative evaluation of the current disaster and crisis management systems.

Design/methodology/approach

Literature review shows that the disaster and crisis management system in Turkey has been developed after tragic events. The paper examines what kinds of initiatives were introduced and what is the trend in shift. After analyzing recent cases and exploring some government initiatives, alternative approaches and suggestions were included.

Findings

Turkey has developed its disaster and crisis management system since 1930, which mostly depended on experiences. The current disaster and crisis management system is governed by a centralized structure which is the responsibility of different ministries. Nonetheless, the system is very weak at local level. Furthermore, participation of non‐profit organizations is very limited at both national and local levels. Thus, coordination and management of first‐response operations during crises are problematic and ineffective. Particularly, the system is not designed for different types of crises such as terrorist attacks.

Practical implications

Crisis management in Turkey needs a more unified and flexible structure to deal with current problems effectively. Further suggestions for better implication are also provided

Originality/value

The effectiveness of the disaster and crisis management system is analyzed in natural and man‐made disasters. Findings show that centralized and decentralized systems have different functions in different situations.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article
Publication date: 30 April 2020

Lina Gyllencreutz, Monica Rådestad and Britt-Inger Saveman

The purpose of this study was from a Swedish perspective to map experts' opinions on theoretical statements of essential collaboration activities for management of mining…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was from a Swedish perspective to map experts' opinions on theoretical statements of essential collaboration activities for management of mining injury incidents.

Design/methodology/approach

A Delphi technique was performed, asking opinions from experts in iterative rounds to generate understanding and form consensus on group opinion around multi-agency management. The experts were personnel from emergency medical service, rescue service and mine industry, all with operative command positions.

Findings

Three iterative rounds were performed. The first round was conducted as a workshop to collect opinions about the most important multi-agency collaboration activities to optimize victim's outcome from an injury incident in an underground mine. This resulted in 63 statements and additional three were added during the second round. The statements were divided into one trajectory and seventh time phases and comprised, e.g. early alarm routines, support of early life-saving interventions, relevant resources and equipment for the assignment and command and control center and functions with predefined action plans for response. It also comprised shared and communicated decisions about each agency's responsibility and safety. All statements reached consensus among the experts in Round 3.

Research limitations/implications

The experts included in this study seem to be adequate but there could be other experts and different statements that other researchers might consider.

Practical implications

These statements could be used to evaluate collaboration in major incidents exercises. The statements can also be quality indicators for reporting results from multi-agency management.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the research field of collaboration and joint practices between and among personnel involved in rescue operations.

Details

International Journal of Emergency Services, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2047-0894

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 12 November 2018

Sebastian Drexel, Susanne Zimmermann-Janschitz and Robert J. Koester

A search and rescue incident is ultimately all about the location of the missing person; hence, geotechnical tools are critical in providing assistance to search planners…

Abstract

Purpose

A search and rescue incident is ultimately all about the location of the missing person; hence, geotechnical tools are critical in providing assistance to search planners. One critical role of Geographic Information Systems (GISs) is to define the boundaries that define the search area. The literature mostly focuses on ring- and area-based methods but lacks a linear/network approach. The purpose of this paper is to present a novel network approach that will benefit search planners by saving time, requires less data layers and provides better results.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper compares two existing models (Ring Model, Travel Time Cost Surface Model (TTCSM)) against a new network model (Travel Time Network Model) by using a case study from a mountainous area in Austria. Newest data from the International Search and Rescue Incident Database are used for all three models. Advantages and disadvantages of each model are evaluated.

Findings

Network analyses offer a fruitful alternative to the Ring Model and the TTCSM for estimating search areas, especially for regions with comprehensive trail/road networks. Furthermore, only few basic data are needed for quick calculation.

Practical implications

The paper supports GIS network analyses for wildland search and rescue operations to raise the survival chances of missing persons due to optimizing search area estimation.

Originality/value

The paper demonstrates the value of the novel network approach, which requires fewer GIS layers and less time to generate a solution. Furthermore, the paper provides a comparison between all three potential models.

Details

International Journal of Emergency Services, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2047-0894

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 24 December 2020

Amin Maghsoudi and Mohammad Moshtari

This paper identifies the challenges during a recent disaster relief operation in a developing country where the humanitarian response is dominated by national actors…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper identifies the challenges during a recent disaster relief operation in a developing country where the humanitarian response is dominated by national actors, with international actors having a minor role.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study design is used; the main data sources are semi-structured interviews with 43 informants involved in the 2017 Kermanshah earthquake relief operation.

Findings

The findings suggest that humanitarian practitioners deal with multiple challenges during disaster relief operations. One group of challenges relates to humanitarian logistics (HL) like needs assessment, procurement, warehousing, transportation and distribution, all widely discussed in the literature. Another involves the growing use of social media, legitimacy regulations and the engagement of new humanitarian actors (HAs) like social media activists and celebrities. These factors have not been extensively studied in the literature; given their growing influence, they require more scholarly attention.

Practical implications

The findings will help humanitarian practitioners and policymakers better understand the challenges involved in disaster relief operations conducted by multiple actors and thus help them improve their practices, including the creation of proper regulations, policies and logistics strategies.

Originality/value

The study uses primary data on a recent disaster to assess and extend the findings of previous studies regarding HL challenges. It also elaborates on the critical non-logistical challenges that influence aid delivery in emergency responses, including the growth of social media, regulations and the engagement of new HAs. The results may motivate future empirical and modelling studies to investigate the identified challenges and identify practices to mitigate them.

Details

Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6747

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Article
Publication date: 7 October 2014

Sofie Pilemalm, Dennis Andersson and Kayvan Yousefi Mojir

The purpose of this paper is to explore the re-development process of the Swedish Rescue Services Incident Reporting System from an organizational learning perspective…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the re-development process of the Swedish Rescue Services Incident Reporting System from an organizational learning perspective with the purpose to suggest what is needed to enable long-term learning from rescue operations.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is carried out as a case study relying on interviews, participant observation and workshop methods. The study case is the Swedish Incident Reporting System.

Findings

The objectives expressed by the central agency leading the studied process aimed at implementing double-loop learning objectives by revising the incident reports and to improve future operations accordingly. In practice this objective was lost along the way, with the agency focussing on cosmetic changes to the report such as terminology, attributes and labels. Meanwhile the local rescue services expressed different and concrete needs, requiring new system functionality, case/experience based learning, process improvements and organizational development. A number of suggestions of such measures are provided by the study, to be used by rescue services and other response organizations.

Originality/value

The case stands out because the re-development process is driven by one stakeholder, with the ambition to include multiple stakeholders’ needs. The study should be of specific interest to fire rescue services world-wide. However, considering that many tasks, learning and evaluation aspects of rescue operations are similar regardless of type of first responder involved (e.g. in firefighting, traffic accidents, and cardiac arrests), the results are also of interest to emergency management in general.

Details

International Journal of Emergency Services, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2047-0894

Keywords

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