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Article
Publication date: 15 May 2009

Mahalia Jackman, Roland Craigwell and Winston Moore

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the potential link between remittances and economic volatility in small island developing states.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the potential link between remittances and economic volatility in small island developing states.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper estimates a panel data model using a database containing 20 small island developing states (SIDS) observed over annual intervals between 1986 and 2005.

Findings

The results suggest that, in general, remittance flows have a stabilising influence on output and investment volatility. However, given the importance of these flows to SIDS, the volatility of remittances also has a significant and positive impact on both investment and consumption volatility.

Practical implications

The policy implications of the study's findings is that SIDS (similar to how oil‐producing nations take oil price fluctuations into account when considering policy changes) may have to monitor and forecast future remittance flows and take these projections into account when making changes to either their monetary or fiscal policy stance.

Originality/value

Workers' remittances have grown dramatically worldwide, particularly in SIDS, where they constitute one of the main sources of foreign exchange. Given the importance of these flows to economic growth and development in these countries, this study examines the potential link between remittances and economic volatility.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 September 2012

Syed Tehseen Jawaid and Syed Ali Raza

This purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between workers' remittances and economic growth in China and Korea.

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Abstract

Purpose

This purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between workers' remittances and economic growth in China and Korea.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper has employed annual time series data over the period of 1980 to 2009. Johansen and Jeuuselius's cointegration technique, error correction model, and sensitivity analysis have been performed to analyze the long‐run, short‐run relationships and robustness of the results, respectively.

Findings

Cointegration results confirm that there exists significant positive long‐run relationship between remittances and economic growth in Korea, while, significant negative relationship exist between remittances and economic growth in China. Error correction model confirms the significant positive short‐run relationship of workers' remittances with economic growth in Korea, while the results of China were insignificant in short run. Causality analysis confirms unidirectional causality runs from workers' remittances to economic growth, in both China and Korea. Sensitivity analysis confirms that the results are robust.

Practical implications

It is suggested that Korea should form friendly policies to ensure the continuous inflows of workers' remittances and their efficient utilization to ensure economic growth. On the other hand, China should keep an eye to reducing voluntary unemployment, which leads to decrease in productivity and growth in the country.

Originality/value

The paper provides some empirical evidence of whether workers' remittances have contributed significantly to large open economies.

Details

Journal of Chinese Economic and Foreign Trade Studies, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-4408

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 September 2022

Barbara Deladem Mensah and Abdallah Abdul-Mumuni

While several existing panel studies have focused on the linear specifications of the effect of remittances and financial development on carbon emissions, nonlinear panel…

Abstract

Purpose

While several existing panel studies have focused on the linear specifications of the effect of remittances and financial development on carbon emissions, nonlinear panel studies on this subject remain thin on the ground. The purpose of this paper is to examine the asymmetric effect of remittances and financial development on carbon emissions in 31 selected sub-Saharan African countries for the period spanning from 1996 to 2018.

Design/methodology/approach

The Kao, Pedroni and Johansen–Fisher co-integration tests were conducted to ascertain a long-run relationship among the studied variables, whereas the nonlinear panel autoregressive distributed lag approach was applied to account for asymmetries.

Findings

The study revealed, among other things, that remittances and financial development asymmetrically influence carbon emissions in the selected panel of sub-Saharan African countries. In the long run, the positive shock in remittances on carbon emissions is greater than in the negative shock in remittances. Additionally, both positive and negative shocks in financial development mitigate carbon emissions.

Research limitations/implications

The implications of this study include the need to provide tax incentives to remitters and encourage them to invest in clean technologies so as to maintain sustainable development and low carbon emissions in the environment. There is also the need for governments and policymakers to formulate policies aimed at improving the functioning of the financial sectors in sub-Saharan Africa.

Originality/value

The positive and negative shocks of remittances and financial development on carbon emissions are examined to ascertain their asymmetric relationships.

Details

International Journal of Energy Sector Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6220

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 September 2022

Wei-Lun Chang and Vladlena Benson

In the global migration crisis COVID 19 had devastating consequences. Workers were confined to their locations due to travel restrictions and working from home became…

Abstract

Purpose

In the global migration crisis COVID 19 had devastating consequences. Workers were confined to their locations due to travel restrictions and working from home became “working away from home” for millions of migrant workers. Mobile financial services emerged as key to livelihood of the mobile remittance recipients. It is essential for service providers to gain insights of users' motives to use mobile remittance services.

Design/methodology/approach

This study proposed the model by extending unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT) model and integrating by perceived cost (PC) and perceived security (PS). Based on the survey data (n = 344) the proposed model was tested using analysis of variance (ANOVA) analysis.

Findings

The findings reveal that performance expectancy, effort expectancy, PC and PS affect the users' behavioral intention (BI) to use mobile remittance applications. Social influence nonsignificantly affects the BI and there is no significant influence of facilitating conditions on user behavior.

Originality/value

The volume of migrant workers preCOVID 19 reached 3.5% of the global population, the shear number of unprotected workers plunged into devastation by the COVID-19 impact is huge to cause an economic meltdown. Under the pandemic crisis conditions, the findings provide several practical implications on how service providers could improve their products and services to increase mobile remittance applications usage.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 September 2022

Ronald Djeunankan and Honoré Tekam

This study aims to contribute to the growing literature on the effects of remittances and the determinants of health outcomes by analysing for the first time the effect of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to contribute to the growing literature on the effects of remittances and the determinants of health outcomes by analysing for the first time the effect of remittances on health outcomes in developing countries using a panel vector autoregression (PVAR) model.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses panel data from 107 developing countries over the period from 1990 to 2018 to examine the effect of remittances on health outcome in developing countries.

Findings

The main findings from study is that remittances improve health outcomes in developing countries. Another finding of this study is that income, trade, foreign direct investment and financial devlopment improve health outcome.

Originality/value

The contribution of this study is fourfold. Firstly, it adopts the PVAR methodology in a Generalized Method of Moments framework proposed by Abrigo and Love (2016). Secondly, it analyses the implications of remittances on health outcomes by relying on two comprehensive measures of health outcomes commonly used in the literature which are life expectancy at birth and the rate of under-five mortality rates. Thirdly, we identify governance and maternal education as the channels through which remittances improve health outcomes in developing countries. Finally, the current paper covers an extensive time span (29 years) and focuses on a large sample (107 countries).

Details

International Journal of Development Issues, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1446-8956

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 September 2022

Kaycea Campbell, Anupam Das, Leanora Brown and Adian McFarlane

It has been suggested that homicides in Jamaica are partly driven by conflicts among criminals over funds coming from international lottery scams; most of these funds are…

Abstract

Purpose

It has been suggested that homicides in Jamaica are partly driven by conflicts among criminals over funds coming from international lottery scams; most of these funds are channeled into the country via remittances. This study aims to determine the empirical relationship between remittances and homicides in Jamaica over the period 1985–2019.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors apply an error correction modelling framework while accounting for indicators of changes in socioeconomic conditions.

Findings

There are two. First, the authors find from impulse response analysis of the long-run dynamics that an increase in remittances is associated with an increase in homicides, and vice versa. Second, the authors find that there is bidirectional Granger causality between remittances and homicides in the short run.

Social implications

Two important implications are that policies should be strengthened to channel remittances to productive and legal investment opportunities and that greater efforts may be needed to stem the flow of funds coming from international lottery scamming and other illegal activities.

Originality/value

This is the first study that examines the dynamic relationship between remittances and homicides in Jamaica from a robust statistical perspective.

Details

Journal of Money Laundering Control, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-5201

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 31 December 2010

Yan Xing, Moshe Semyonov and Yitchak Haberfeld

Remittances sent by immigrants have long been viewed as a means to combat poverty, to improve consumption, and to raise standard of living. The present study examines the…

Abstract

Remittances sent by immigrants have long been viewed as a means to combat poverty, to improve consumption, and to raise standard of living. The present study examines the impact of remittances on the economic well-being of Indian households. The analysis is conducted on a randomly selected representative sample of households in Rajasthan. Three types of households are examined: 575 households having current labor migrants, 162 never having migrants, and 232 not having migrants at present but sent migrants in the past. Analysis of the data reveals meaningful differences between the three types of households. Specifically, those having labor migrants are characterized by the highest household income and standard of living. Further analyses suggest that although remittances are likely to improve economic well-being and to secure a higher standard of living they do not have long lasting effect on the economic well-being of the families when migration ends.

Details

Migration and Culture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-153-5

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 31 December 2010

Don DeVoretz and Florin Vadean

This chapter analyses the effect of cultural differences among ethnic groups on the remittance behaviour of native and immigrant households in Canada. In contrast to the…

Abstract

This chapter analyses the effect of cultural differences among ethnic groups on the remittance behaviour of native and immigrant households in Canada. In contrast to the New Economic of Labour Migration (NELM) literature that examines remittance motivation in the framework of extended family agreements, we embed remittances in a formal demand system, suggesting that they represent expenditures on social relations with relatives and/or friends and contribute to membership in social/religious organisations respectively. The results indicate strong ethnic group cultural differences in the remittance behaviour of recent Asian immigrant households and highlight the importance of differentiating with respect to cultural background when analysing the determinants of remittances.

Details

Migration and Culture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-153-5

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 2 May 2013

Steffen Dalsgaard

Purpose – The chapter discusses the importance of remittances for the way rural people in Manus Province, Papua New Guinea, engage with capitalism in the form of…

Abstract

Purpose – The chapter discusses the importance of remittances for the way rural people in Manus Province, Papua New Guinea, engage with capitalism in the form of development, wage labor, and the modern consumer economy.Methodology/approach – The chapter draws upon a combination of original ethnographic fieldwork conducted between 2002 and 2008 and readings of previous anthropological research about Manus.Findings – The chapter shows how the remittances of goods and money are part of the maintenance of long-term exchange relationships between emigrants and their rural kin, and how remittances are regarded as crucial in fostering local development. The remittances comprise a large proportion of the flow of money into Manus. They also form social ties between migrants and villagers, and may facilitate the return of migrants to their home village. The moral conflicts and evaluations of status and leadership tied into the remittance practices and the strategies employed by returning migrants are explained as the articulation of different values rather than one system supplanting the other.Originality/value – The aspect of remittances related to return migration is particularly under-theorized in anthropology. In this way the chapter has value to both researchers specializing in remittance-economies or local-level politics and development planners and practitioners.

Details

Engaging with Capitalism: Cases from Oceania
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-542-5

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 4 March 2015

Jakhongir Kakhkharov and Alexandr Akimov

Remittances in the former Soviet Union have increased rapidly over the past decade. In some countries of the former Soviet Union, remittances have reached staggering…

Abstract

Remittances in the former Soviet Union have increased rapidly over the past decade. In some countries of the former Soviet Union, remittances have reached staggering levels. For example, in Armenia, Kyrgyzstan, Moldova, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan remittances now account for over 10% of GDP, with Tajikistan leading the pack with annual remittances of approximately 40% of GDP. Remittances in this group of economies now exceed foreign direct investment and foreign assistance. Because this rapid rise in remittances is a relatively recent trend and obtaining reliable data is difficult, this area of research has been underexplored.

The aim of this paper is to provide a comprehensive review of existing remittance measurement methodologies. Moreover, we propose practical methods to adjust the Central Bank of Russia data to derive more accurate remittances estimates in selected countries of the former Soviet Union. These selected economies are major recipients of remittances among transition economies and account for as much as 10% of remittances worldwide. There have been attempts to provide this type of estimation in individual countries; however, there have been no studies, to our knowledge, that propose a general methodology for the region.

Details

Neo-Transitional Economics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-681-2

Keywords

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