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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1981

Rajan Chandran and Richard A. Lancioni

Product recalls are no longer in the realm of theoretical possibilities; it is a regular fact of business life among manufacturers of both industrial and consumer…

Abstract

Product recalls are no longer in the realm of theoretical possibilities; it is a regular fact of business life among manufacturers of both industrial and consumer products. Machine tools, automobiles, television sets, appliances, cosmetics, clothes — no product is immune and the list is virtually endless. The actual number of product units recalled every year among the various classes of products is mind‐boggling, and the cost of recalling them runs into millions of dollars. And as for the future, the prognostication from the evidence so far is that the number and types of products as well as the companies involved will continue to grow. The principal reasons for this prognostication are:

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Materials Management, vol. 11 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0269-8218

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2021

Maximilian Körber and Diogo Cotta

This study aims to investigate the extent to which the presence of chief supply chain officers (CSCOs) in top management teams (TMTs) helps firms to reduce the incidence…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the extent to which the presence of chief supply chain officers (CSCOs) in top management teams (TMTs) helps firms to reduce the incidence of product recalls.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors identified all recalls for the period 2010–2017 issued by publicly held firms regulated by the US Consumer Product Safety Commission. These data were subsequently combined with information on TMT composition from BoardEx and financial performance data from Compustat to create a unique data set.

Findings

The study identified a significant and negative association between CSCO presence and incidence of product recalls. The evidence also supports the conjecture that this association is stronger in larger firms, indicating that CSCOs are especially effective when operating within more complex supply chains.

Practical implications

The findings provide important insights into quality management in contemporary supply chains and indicate that assigning specific responsibility for supply chain management to a TMT member improves product reliability.

Originality/value

These findings contribute to the growing literature on the underlying causes of a product recall by identifying corporate governance antecedents of external quality failures of this kind.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 3 February 2021

Roman Schumacher, Rob Glew, Naoum Tsolakis and Mukesh Kumar

The purpose of this paper is to investigate strategies to manage product recalls where shortages are a critical threat, with impacts such as loss of life. The authors aim…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate strategies to manage product recalls where shortages are a critical threat, with impacts such as loss of life. The authors aim to identify key supply chain strategies and opportunities for theoretical advancement by taking a resilience perspective on temporary supply chain design.

Design/methodology/approach

First, the authors conducted an impact event analysis of product recalls by exploring the RAPEX database and official statements of individual country regulators. Second, the authors conducted an exploratory case study with the Cambridge University Hospitals on Personal Protective Equipment to explore product recall risks, utilising an action research methodology.

Findings

Additional processes, mainly testing, can compensate for the risks that may arise from temporary supply chains, where changes in location and product design are not possible due to the immediate nature of demand caused by COVID-19 pandemic. This finding reflects on the resilience of designing and implementing temporary supply chains from the perspective of product, process and location.

Research limitations/implications

This paper does not employ an in-depth multiple case study methodology. However, the authors argue that the role of institutional actors in global supply chains and its implications on product safety needs to be empirically studied in order to expand existing supply chain management theories to cover resilience in emerging, mature and temporary supply chain.

Practical implications

Managers can learn from the Cambridge University Hospitals case study that a downstream quality inspection system can be deployed to manage product quality and safety risks where recalls are not an option, such as during critical situations in the COVID-19 pandemic.

Social implications

The authors’ observations suggest that governments may be socially responsible for implementing rigorous mechanisms to manage product recall risks that compromise consumer safety.

Originality/value

The authors’ study is uniquely designed and studies various specific phenomena of product recalls risks in COVID-19. The unique design features include a dynamic and recent database analysis involving a product, process and location centric perspective complemented with a Cambridge University Hospitals case study.

Details

Continuity & Resilience Review, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2516-7502

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2021

Sascha Raithel, Alexander Mafael and Stefan J. Hock

There is limited insight concerning a firm’s remedy choice after a product recall. This study aims to propose that failure severity and brand equity are key antecedents of…

Abstract

Purpose

There is limited insight concerning a firm’s remedy choice after a product recall. This study aims to propose that failure severity and brand equity are key antecedents of remedy choice and provides empirical evidence for a non-linear relationship between pre-recall brand equity and the firm’s remedy offer that is moderated by severity.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses field data for 159 product recalls from 60 brands between January 2008 to February 2020 to estimate a probit model of the effects of failure severity, pre-recall brand equity and remedy choice.

Findings

Firms with higher and lower pre-recall brand equity are less likely to offer full (vs partial) remedy compared to medium level pre-recall brand equity firms. Failure severity moderates this relationship positively, i.e. firms with low and high brand equity are more sensitive to failure severity and then select full instead of partial remedy.

Research limitations/implications

This research reconciles contradictory arguments and research results about failure severity as an antecedent of remedy choice by introducing brand equity as another key variable. Future research could examine the psychological process of managerial decision-making through experiments.

Practical implications

This study increases the awareness of the importance of remedy choice during product-harm crises and can help firms and regulators to better understand managerial decision-making mechanisms (and fallacies) during a product-harm crisis.

Originality/value

This study theoretically and empirically advances the limited literature on managerial decision-making in response to product recalls.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Book part
Publication date: 13 July 2016

Matthew E. Brashears and Laura Aufderheide Brashears

Balance Theory has accumulated an impressive record of empirical confirmation at both the micro- and macro-levels. Yet, it is unclear why humans consistently prefer…

Abstract

Purpose

Balance Theory has accumulated an impressive record of empirical confirmation at both the micro- and macro-levels. Yet, it is unclear why humans consistently prefer balanced relations when imbalance offers the opportunity to reap material rewards. We argue that balance is preferred because it functions as a “compression heuristic,” allowing networks to be more easily encoded in, and recalled from, memory.

Methodology/approach

We present the results of a novel randomized laboratory experiment using nearly 300 subjects. We evaluate the independent and joint effects of degree of balance/imbalance and presence/absence of kin compression heuristics on network recall.

Findings

We find that memory for relationship valence is more accurate for balanced, rather than imbalanced, networks and that relationship existence and relationship valence are separable cognitive elements. We also use comparisons between kin and non-kin networks to suggest that humans are implicitly aware of the conditions under which imbalanced networks will be most durable.

Research limitations/implications

We show that the tension/strain postulated to generate mental and behavioral responses to increase balance likely stems from cognitive limitations. More broadly, this connects balance theory to models of human cognition and evolution and suggests that human general processing ability may have evolved in response to social, rather than physical, challenges.

Details

Advances in Group Processes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-041-1

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Book part
Publication date: 11 August 2014

Núria Rodríguez-Planas

This paper is the first to present empirical evidence consistent with models of signaling through unemployment and to uncover a new stylized fact using the 1988–2006…

Abstract

This paper is the first to present empirical evidence consistent with models of signaling through unemployment and to uncover a new stylized fact using the 1988–2006 Displaced Worker Supplement (DWS) of the Current Population Survey (CPS), namely that, among white-collar workers, post-displacement earnings fall less rapidly with unemployment spells for layoffs than for plant closings. Because high-productivity workers are more likely to be recalled than low-productivity ones, they may choose to signal their productivity though unemployment, in which case the duration of unemployment may be positively related to post-displacement wages. Identification is done using workers whose plant closed as they cannot be recalled, and no incentives to signal arise.

Details

New Analyses of Worker Well-Being
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-056-7

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2020

Dara Schniederjans and Mehrnaz Khalajhedayati

Product recalls have the potential to damage firm and consumer quality reputation. While globalization has brought about various economic benefits, expanding supply chain…

Abstract

Purpose

Product recalls have the potential to damage firm and consumer quality reputation. While globalization has brought about various economic benefits, expanding supply chain networks have also made it more difficult for downstream organizations to manage product recall strategy. This study aims to examine the role of culture on a manufacturer's initiation of a recall and the severity of the remedy chosen for the product recall.

Design/methodology/approach

Utilizing the culture-specific argument, this study uses an exploratory approach to assess how cultural variables impact recall strategy utilizing a large-scale data analysis with a cross-sectional time-series panel of 898 firms.

Findings

The results provide support for the expected utility hypothesis that the more severe the consequence, the more likely a manufacturer will decide to recall the product. Moreover, the more likely the manufacturer will provide greater returns to the consumer. However, these relationships are impacted to differing degrees by the manufacturer's cultural origin.

Originality/value

These results provide evidence to researchers about how culture impacts the expected utility hypothesis in the decision theory. The study examines how deeply embedded cultural variables impact the relationship between the foreseeable consequence of the product recall and the recall facilitator and remedy.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2020

Mahdi Zeynali Tazehkandi and Mohsen Nowkarizi

The purpose of this paper is to present a review on the use of the recall metric for evaluating information retrieval systems, especially search engines.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a review on the use of the recall metric for evaluating information retrieval systems, especially search engines.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper investigates different researchers’ views about recall metrics.

Findings

Five different definitions for recall were identified. For the first group, recall refers to completeness, but it does not specify where all the relevant documents are located. For the second group, recall refers to retrieving all the relevant documents from the collection. However, it seems that the term “collection” is ambiguous. For the third group (first approach), collection means the index of search engines and, for the fourth group (second approach), collection refers to the Web. For the fifth group (third approach), ranking of the retrieved documents should also be accounted for in calculating recall.

Practical implications

It can be said that in the first, second and third approaches, the components of the retrieval algorithm, the retrieval algorithm and crawler, and the retrieval algorithm and crawler and ranker, respectively, are evaluated. To determine the effectiveness of search engines for the use of users, it is better to use the third approach in recall measurement.

Originality/value

The value of this paper is to collect, identify and analyse literature that is used in recall. In addition, different views of researchers about recall are identified.

Details

The Electronic Library , vol. 38 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2019

Shereen Nassar, Tarek Kandil, Merve Er Kara and Abhijeet Ghadge

The purpose of this paper is to examine the automotive product recall risk in terms of social sustainability performance and to evaluate the role of buyer‒supplier…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the automotive product recall risk in terms of social sustainability performance and to evaluate the role of buyer‒supplier relationships in improving social sustainability during product recall crises.

Design/methodology/approach

A multi-methodology approach is used to empirically analyse the interrelationship between the proposed constructs and enablers of the buyer‒supplier relationship. Structural equation modelling and interpretive structural modelling are followed to analyse the data gathered thorough a questionnaire survey of 204 executives and interviews with 15 managers from the automotive industry.

Findings

The results of the study provide evidence regarding the impact of the responsible buyer‒supplier relationship on customer recall concerns and the social sustainability performance of supply chains (SCs). This study also leads to the development of a conceptual model, providing a relationship between the three key concepts used in this study.

Research limitations/implications

Following social sustainability principles, this study addresses the importance of developing strong, responsible relational ties with suppliers to reduce vehicle recalls or successfully recover from a product recall crisis.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature by providing theoretical and empirical insights for developing socially responsible SCs and confirming the role of the buyer‒supplier governance mechanism during product recalls in the context of the automotive industry.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 69 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1969

S.E. ROBERTSON

Some parameters and techniques in use for describing the results of tests on IR systems are analysed. Several considerations outside the scope of the usual 2 x 2 table are…

Abstract

Some parameters and techniques in use for describing the results of tests on IR systems are analysed. Several considerations outside the scope of the usual 2 x 2 table are relevant to the choice of parameters. In particular, a variable which produces a ‘performance curve’ of a system corresponds to an extension of the 2 x 2 table. Also, the statistical relationships between parameters are all‐important. It is considered that precision is not such a useful measure of performance (in conjunction with recall) as fallout. A more powerful alternative to Cleverdon's ‘inevitable inverse relationship between recall and precision’ is proposed and justified, namely that the recall‐fallout graph is convex.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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