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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2009

Dirk Lewandowski

The purpose of this paper is to discuss ranking factors suitable for library materials and to show that ranking in general is a complex process and that ranking for…

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1032

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss ranking factors suitable for library materials and to show that ranking in general is a complex process and that ranking for library materials requires a variety of techniques.

Design/methodology/approach

The relevant literature is reviewed to provide a systematic overview of suitable ranking factors. The discussion is based on an overview of ranking factors used in web search engines.

Findings

While there are a wide variety of ranking factors applicable to library materials, today's library systems use only some of them. When designing a ranking component for the library catalogue, an individual weighting of applicable factors is necessary.

Research limitations/implications

While the paper discusses different factors, no particular ranking formula is given. However, the paper presents the argument that such a formula must always be individual to a certain use case.

Practical implications

The factors presented can be considered when designing a ranking component for a library's search system or when discussing such a project with an ILS vendor.

Originality/value

The paper is original in that it is the first to systematically discuss ranking of library materials based on the main factors used by web search engines.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 1 September 2009

Diki, Susy Puspitasari, Jasrial and Agus Djaya

Universitas Terbuka (UT) aims at achieving a world class standard. As one of the criteria of a world class university is the world ranking, it is planned that the…

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1235

Abstract

Universitas Terbuka (UT) aims at achieving a world class standard. As one of the criteria of a world class university is the world ranking, it is planned that the university should achieve a high position within the ranking. At present, the ranking systems are the Shanghai Jiao Tong University (SJTU) and Times Higher Education Supplement (THES). Positions of open universities in world university ranking are in the lower tier, both according to the THES and SJTU. However, ranking have a positive impact toward universities. Hence, it is possible that through the effort of achieving a high ranking, UT will have the benefit of improving its quality of services toward its stakeholders. If it is possible that ranking system criteria also fits the achievement of quality, there should be an advantage of gaining a high position in world ranking for UT. Therefore the question is how to improve the position of an open university within the international university ranking. Although the main priority of UT mission is to provide access of quality education to those who for some reason cannot attend conventional education, UT has opportunities for improving its rank among world university ranking. The advantage of the ranking is that it can support the effort to become a world class university. UT should improve international cooperation, both in teaching and research, while the research activities should be improved, both in its quality and its publications in accredited international journals. Lastly, the effort for achieving a high position in world ranking should not ignore the main mission of UT to provide access to education.

Details

Asian Association of Open Universities Journal, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1858-3431

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Article
Publication date: 9 January 2007

Andrew J. Policano

The purpose of this paper is to assess the value of the media rankings of business schools from the perspective of students, business schools and the media.

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2702

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the value of the media rankings of business schools from the perspective of students, business schools and the media.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper analyses the rankings given to various schools by various publications.

Findings

The media rankings give the perception that there are more significant differences between similar MBA programs than actually exist. Indeed, many times it is the arbitrary weighting assigned by the media to the variables in the ranking rather than the quality of the school that accounts for differences across similar programs. A more accurate description of quality would be obtained by rating schools in groups of programs of similar quality.

Originality/value

Business school applicants can utilize media rankings to identify the top 100 MBA programs but should not base their decision between different programs on a specific ranking of one school relative to another. Rather, the applicant should examine the raw data behind the ranking, along with many other non‐quantitative factors, in assessing which is the program best matches their particular interests and aspirations.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2013

Vitaliy V. Tsyganok

– The paper's aim is to design and describe a new mathematical ware instrument allowing to facilitate group decision-making process with feedback.

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175

Abstract

Purpose

The paper's aim is to design and describe a new mathematical ware instrument allowing to facilitate group decision-making process with feedback.

Design/methodology/approach

The aim is achieved through the development of a method for achieving sufficient consistency of individual expert alternative rankings based on evolutionary algorithms. The method is targeted at minimizing the number of times the experts in the group are addressed.

Findings

The method developed and described in the paper allows to provide sufficient consistency level of individual expert rankings allowing to aggregate the rankings into a transitive preference relation.

Research limitations/implications

The method is targeted at small expert groups. The method is limited by psycho-physiological constraints of human (expert's) mind, which is unable to analyze more than seven objects simultaneously.

Practical implications

The method can be used in different scopes of human activity requiring ordinal expert estimation.

Originality/value

The method is based on an original approach to organising feedback with experts. Genetic algorithm is used to determine the optimal candidate among the experts to be addressed at every feedback step.

Details

Journal of Modelling in Management, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5664

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Article
Publication date: 9 January 2007

Della Bradshaw

The paper seeks to describe the rationale behind the Financial Times business school rankings and some of the problems inherent in developing and publishing them.

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3503

Abstract

Purpose

The paper seeks to describe the rationale behind the Financial Times business school rankings and some of the problems inherent in developing and publishing them.

Design/methodology/approach

The rationale behind the Financial Times business school rankings is discussed, as are the ways in which business schools use the rankings.

Findings

Business schools have an ambivalent relationship to business schools rankings, openly criticising them but using favourable aspects of the rankings in their schools' marketing.

Originality/value

Business school rankings are probably here to stay. Most business schools are developing ways of using them for their own purposes.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2014

Chih-Fong Tsai, Ya-Han Hu and Shih-Wen George Ke

Ranking relevant journals is very critical for researchers to choose their publication outlets, which can affect their research performance. In the management information…

Abstract

Purpose

Ranking relevant journals is very critical for researchers to choose their publication outlets, which can affect their research performance. In the management information systems (MIS) subject, many related studies conducted surveys as the subjective method for identifying MIS journal rankings. However, very few consider other objective methods, such as journals’ impact factors and h-indexes. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, top 50 ranked journals identified by researchers’ perceptions are examined in terms of the correlation to the rankings by their impact factors and h-indexes. Moreover, a hybrid method to combine these different rankings based on Borda count is used to produce new MIS journal rankings.

Findings

The results show that there are low correlations between the subjective and objective based MIS journal rankings. In addition, the new MIS journal rankings by the Borda count approach can also be considered for future researches.

Originality/value

The contribution of this paper is to apply the Borda count approach to combine different MIS journal rankings produced by subjective and objective methods. The new MIS journal rankings and previous studies can be complementary to allow researchers to determine the top-ranked journals for their publication outlets.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Article
Publication date: 9 September 2021

Yuan George Shan, Junru Zhang, Manzurul Alam and Phil Hancock

This study aims to investigate the relationship between university rankings and sustainability reporting among Australia and New Zealand universities. Even though…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the relationship between university rankings and sustainability reporting among Australia and New Zealand universities. Even though sustainability reporting is an established area of investigation, prior research has paid inadequate attention to the nexus of university ranking and sustainability reporting.

Design/methodology/approach

This study covers 46 Australian and New Zealand universities and uses a data set, which includes sustainability reports and disclosures from four reporting channels including university websites, and university archives, between 2005 and 2018. Ordinary least squares regression was used with Pearson and Spearman’s rank correlations to investigate the likelihood of multi-collinearity and the paper also calculated the variance inflation factor values. Finally, this study uses the generalized method of moments approach to test for endogeneity.

Findings

The findings suggest that sustainability reporting is significantly and positively associated with university ranking and confirm that the four reporting channels play a vital role when communicating with university stakeholders. Further, this paper documents that sustainability reporting through websites, in addition to the annual report and a separate environment report have a positive impact on the university ranking systems.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to extant knowledge on the link between university rankings and university sustainability reporting which is considered a vital communication vehicle to meet the expectation of the stakeholder in relevance with the university rankings.

Details

Meditari Accountancy Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-372X

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Book part
Publication date: 5 February 2016

Craig Tutterow and James A. Evans

University rankings and metrics have become an increasingly prominent basis of student decisions, generalized university reputation, and the resources university’s…

Abstract

University rankings and metrics have become an increasingly prominent basis of student decisions, generalized university reputation, and the resources university’s attract. We review the history of metrics in higher education and scholarship about the influence of ranking on the position and strategic behavior of universities and students. Most quantitative analyses on this topic estimate the influence of change in university rank on performance. These studies consistently identify a small, short-lived influence of rank shift on selectivity (e.g., one rank position corresponds to ≤1% more student applicants), comparable to ranking effects documented in other domains. This understates the larger system-level impact of metrification on universities, students, and the professions that surround them. We explore one system-level transformation likely influenced by the rise of rankings. Recent years have witnessed the rise of enrollment management and independent educational consultation. We illustrate a plausible pathway from ranking to this transformation: In an effort to improve rankings, universities solicit more applications from students to reduce their acceptance rate. Lower acceptance rates lead to more uncertainty for students about acceptance, leading them to apply to more schools, which decreases the probability that accepted students will attend. This leads to greater uncertainty about enrollment for students and universities and generates demand for new services to manage it. Because these and other system-level transformations are not as cleanly measured as rank position and performance, they have not received the same treatment or modeling attention in higher education scholarship, despite their importance for understanding and influencing education policy.

Details

The University Under Pressure
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-831-5

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Book part
Publication date: 7 October 2019

Kenneth Snead, Fred Coleman and Earl McKinney

This chapter presents findings from a recently conducted process for obtaining Accounting Advisory Board (AAB) input related to Master of Accountancy curriculum of one…

Abstract

This chapter presents findings from a recently conducted process for obtaining Accounting Advisory Board (AAB) input related to Master of Accountancy curriculum of one university. Board members represent both large and small public accounting firms as well as corporate offices of Fortune 500 companies and non-profit organizations. AAB input includes perceptions of the relative importance of over 160 candidate topics for the courses making up the program’s infrastructure, as well as written comments noting other potential topics and pedagogical approaches to consider. Comparisons of topic rankings reveal a strong level of consistency among Board member types for the traditional accounting courses with structured content, as opposed to those courses involving more systems-related topics or having a wider range of specialized topics. Furthermore, the authors compare Board perceptions regarding topic necessity to those of faculty and note faculty reactions. Specifically, the authors find that faculty ranking consistency with the Board is weak, illustrating the importance of seeking curricular Board input on an ongoing basis. To “close the loop,” faculty incorporated many curriculum changes, involving both the topics to be covered and the overall approach to the course.

Details

Advances in Accounting Education: Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-394-5

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Book part
Publication date: 7 August 2019

Afshin Mehrpouya and Rita Samiolo

Through the example of a “regulatory ranking” – an index produced with the aim to regulate the pharmaceutical market by pushing companies in the direction of providing…

Abstract

Through the example of a “regulatory ranking” – an index produced with the aim to regulate the pharmaceutical market by pushing companies in the direction of providing greater access to medicine in developing countries – this chapter focuses on indexing and ranking as infrastructural processes which inscribe global problem spaces as unfolding actionable territories for market intervention. It foregrounds the “Indexal thinking” which structures and informs regulatory rankings – their aspiration to align the interests of different stakeholders and to entice competition among the ranked companies. The authors detail the infrastructural work through which such ambitions are enacted, detailing processes of infrastructural layering/collage and patchwork through which analysts naturalize/denaturalize various contested categories in the ranking’s territory. They reflect on the consequences of such attempts at reconfiguring global topologies for the problems these governance initiatives seek to address.

Details

Thinking Infrastructures
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-558-0

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