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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2002

Alex Appleby and Ed Mitchell

A recent empirical study of over 300 manufacturing organisations in the North East of England supports the findings of previous studies by Hanson et al. and has identified…

Abstract

A recent empirical study of over 300 manufacturing organisations in the North East of England supports the findings of previous studies by Hanson et al. and has identified fewer “promising” and an even greater proportion of “vulnerable” companies. This paper reports on this new study and identifies significant statistical differences in a number of practices and performance areas. The paper attempts to answer a number of important questions such as, do vulnerable companies really get "something for nothing”? The findings are discussed along with future agendas for change in such organisations.

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Integrated Manufacturing Systems, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6061

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2001

Andrew Robson and Vas B. Prabhu

It is reasonable to assume that levels of business excellence will vary considerably amongst a group of organisations; two recent studies of organisations in north east…

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Abstract

It is reasonable to assume that levels of business excellence will vary considerably amongst a group of organisations; two recent studies of organisations in north east England support this hypothesis. Draws on these benchmarking data. Relates to 28 business excellence practices and 19 operational performance measures covering strategy, human resources, service delivery and quality, service design and innovation, service value and measurement and business performance. Identifies the extent of any significant differences in overall practice and performance attainment levels between service leaders and their counterparts. Also considers combinations of attributes that best discriminate between levels of attainment. Derives a subset of measures that have the potential to provide an insight into a service organisation’s level of practice adoption and corresponding performance. Also considers additional characteristics to ascertain what association, if any, they have with the level of practice adoption and operational performance amongst the service organisations. All significant differences are highlighted at the 5 per cent significance level unless otherwise stated.

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Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

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Book part
Publication date: 23 June 2020

Jessica Ostrow Michel

To date, higher education frameworks for teaching and learning are not designed to focus on interdisciplinary subject matters like sustainability. Consequently, based on…

Abstract

To date, higher education frameworks for teaching and learning are not designed to focus on interdisciplinary subject matters like sustainability. Consequently, based on an in-depth literature review, this chapter presents a theoretical framework for teaching and learning about sustainability. Within this framework, it is posited that opportunity to learn (OTL) about sustainability can directly influence promising practices of teaching and learning about sustainability (including both cognitively responsive teaching and teaching for sustainability) along with transformative sustainability learning outcomes. Additionally, it is posited that OTL can indirectly affect transformative sustainability learning outcomes by directly influencing promising practices of teaching and learning about sustainability. This in turn directly influences transformative sustainability learning outcomes. Implications from this framework offer a distinctive way to frame sustainability-specific subject matter and teaching practices. With respect to practice, this framework can provide critical information to instructors about how to teach sustainability. With regards to conceptual contributions, this framework can guide further research through this precise framing of discussions, as well as guiding data collection and analyses. Also, scholars can continue to examine the framework for facets that are most important, and continue to fine-tune it as it further develops and demonstrates its viability.

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Civil Society and Social Responsibility in Higher Education: International Perspectives on Curriculum and Teaching Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-464-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2008

Valerie Naquin, Spero Manson, Charles Curie, Shannon Sommer, Ray Daw, Carole Maraku, Nemu Lallu, Dale Meller, Cristy Willer and Edward Deaux

The demand for evidence‐based health practices has created a cultural challenge for Indigenous people around the world. This paper reports on the history and evolution of…

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229

Abstract

The demand for evidence‐based health practices has created a cultural challenge for Indigenous people around the world. This paper reports on the history and evolution of evidence‐based care into its mainstream status within the behavioural health field. Through the leadership of an Alaska Native tribal organisation, an international forum was convened to address the challenges of evidence‐based practice for Indigenous people. Forum participants developed a model for gathering evidence that integrates rigorous research with Indigenous knowledge and values. The model facilitates development of practices and programmes that are culturally congruent for Indigenous people, accepted and validated by the research community, and deemed supportable by private and governmental sponsors.

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International Journal of Leadership in Public Services, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9886

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Book part
Publication date: 6 December 2017

Stella Pfisterer

Partnerships with business involvement became a key trend in development cooperation since the late 1980s. Partnerships emerged as promising governance mechanism; however…

Abstract

Partnerships with business involvement became a key trend in development cooperation since the late 1980s. Partnerships emerged as promising governance mechanism; however, governing partnerships in practice remained challenging – promise and reality seem to diverge. This chapter scrutinizes the tension between the promises of partnerships as governance arrangements and their actual governance challenges. It disentangles the complexity of governing partnerships by developing a framework based on a continuum between efficiency- and participation-orientation. This chapter identifies partnering approaches and their governance orientations based on an extensive review of literature in diverse academic fields and grey literature on the emergence and evolution of partnerships in development cooperation since the 1980s. Examples from the Dutch development cooperation provide illustrations for each partnership approach. Efficiency- and participation-orientation highlight competing governance rationales, logics and partnership characteristics. Partnership approaches that aim to embrace both perspectives have to deal with the inherent governance paradox between control and collaboration. This chapter identifies three key implications for research and practice: exploring new governance approaches and practices, adapting development agencies towards partnering and coordinating partnership approaches at international level. Understanding the tension between the promises of partnerships as governance arrangements and their actual governance challenges does not only contribute to more nuanced conceptualizations of partnering approaches for development but has also implications on how to govern partnerships for development in practice.

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The Emerald Handbook of Public–Private Partnerships in Developing and Emerging Economies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-494-1

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Book part
Publication date: 30 September 2020

J. Helen Perkins, Crystal D. Cook and Casey D. Wright

Purpose: This chapter will examine and delineate the intersection of social, emotional, and cultural learning with literacy. Shared are promising practices, while…

Abstract

Purpose: This chapter will examine and delineate the intersection of social, emotional, and cultural learning with literacy. Shared are promising practices, while encouragement is offered to educators for implementing the discussed practices with fidelity and consistency.

Design: Examined is research to explain the significance and benefits of social, emotional, and cultural learning in literacy. Additionally, promising practices are also identified through the review of existing literature.

Findings: The findings in this chapter indicate that students benefit from curriculum that intersects social, emotional, and cultural learning with literacy.

Practical Implications: Educators should learn how to effectively implement social, emotional, and cultural learning in their literacy classrooms daily. Teacher education preparation programs must examine their curriculum and if needed, revise to include social, emotional, and cultural learning in literacy.

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What’s Hot in Literacy: Exemplar Models of Effective Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-874-1

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2007

Andrew Robson and Ed Mitchell

The purpose of this paper is to consider organisational performance relating to “sustainability and inclusion” and to assess four related indicators across the…

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2448

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider organisational performance relating to “sustainability and inclusion” and to assess four related indicators across the manufacturing and service sectors both in absolute performance terms and by level of TQM implementation and organisational size.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on two empirical studies (manufacturing and service) undertaken in North Eastern England, involving the application of a self‐assessed benchmarking tool. Data were collected from 128 manufacturers and 428 service organisations where performance measures relating to “sustainability and inclusion” were considered.

Findings

The findings presented in this paper indicate the level of performance in “sustainability and inclusion”, together with the impact of size, world‐class status and specific individual and aggregated TQM enablers for both sectors. Both manufacturing and service have some way to go in terms of their performance, whilst organisational size and world‐class appear to influence attainment, as do certain individual and aggregated measures of business practice and internal performance.

Research limitations/implications

The paper shows that further research may involve revisiting the participating organisations to identify the extent of any improvement in their performance relating to “sustainability and inclusion”.

Practical implications

The results in this paper indicate the extent of the room for improvement within both manufacturing and service, but indicate how a greater level of TQM maturity and subsequent internal performance puts an individual organisation in a better position to a certain extent to do this.

Originality/value

The findings in the paper are based on benchmarking data, where the implementation of certain TQM practices and measures of internal business performance have been measured alongside a limited number of measures relating to CSR performance across manufacturing and service as part of a wider regional study. Providing these data together has allowed the exploration of the association between the two sets of measures.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 24 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Book part
Publication date: 12 January 2021

Michael Lounsbury, Deborah A. Anderson and Paul Spee

Volumes 70 and 71 of Research in the Sociology of Organizations combine to comprise cutting edge theory and empirical scholarship at the interface of practice and…

Abstract

Volumes 70 and 71 of Research in the Sociology of Organizations combine to comprise cutting edge theory and empirical scholarship at the interface of practice and institution in organization studies. As we highlight, this interface has spurred particularly generative conversations with many open questions, and much to explore. We provide a review of scholarly developments in practice theory and organizational institutionalism that have given rise to this interest in building a bridge between scholarly communities. As signaled by recent efforts to construct a practice-driven institutionalism, we highlight how connecting practice theory with the institutional logics perspective provides a particularly attractive focal point for scholarship at this interface due to a variety of shared ontological and epistemological commitments, including the constitution of actors and their behavior. Collectively, the papers assembled unlock exciting opportunities to connect distinct, but related scholarly communities on practice and institution, seeding scholarship that can advance our understanding of organizational and societal dynamics.

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On Practice and Institution: New Empirical Directions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-416-5

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2010

Alexandros G. Psychogios

This paper aims to increase understanding of the application of total quality management (TQM) initiatives in business environments that differ from those where it…

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1141

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to increase understanding of the application of total quality management (TQM) initiatives in business environments that differ from those where it emerged. Organisations within such environments, which are often less developed, may wish to adopt relatively sophisticated initiatives such as TQM. The adoption of TQM programmes by a variety of private and public sector organisations in South Eastern Europe (SEE) is a prime example. Little has been said about the awareness and applicability of TQM in this region.

Design/methodology/approach

A combination of quantitative and qualitative research approaches was used. The quantitative results emerged from the investigation of 782 managers working in 123 service organisations in public and private sectors (51 and 72 respectively) in four major SEE countries, namely Romania, Serbia, Bulgaria, and Greece. Subsequently, for triangulation and to provide richer data, 34 follow‐up semi‐structured interviews were conducted with managers from these four countries.

Findings

After having carried out quantitative and qualitative analyses, a four‐fold model emerged, through which key features of the application of TQM practices in the SEE region could be explained. The components of the model are categorised in two major groups; first, the influences of the business/management culture and modernisation pressures, and second, two key aspects of the business systems – the education level of managers and the sector of employment.

Research limitations/implications

Both cultural and structural features of the business systems in SEE create pressures either promoting or retarding TQM adoption within organisations. The paper provides a four‐fold factors model that aims to explain key regional‐specific issues related to TQM adoption. This approach provides insights into the region studied, but also provides a prototype for similar studies in other regions.

Practical implications

In the SEE context, the tension between traditional business/management culture and modernisation logic is the key to the evolution of TQM. SEE managers adopt a more pragmatic view of TQM application through the use of “hard” quality management systems and practices, while placing less importance on concepts such as empowerment and employee involvement.

Originality/value

The study argues for the adoption of a regional‐specific view of TQM, applicable to particular regional business systems.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 27 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Book part
Publication date: 11 October 2017

Adrian Crookes

In the context of debates about the performance of Higher Education (HE) in which quantitative measures proliferate, this chapter reports the top line observations of an…

Abstract

In the context of debates about the performance of Higher Education (HE) in which quantitative measures proliferate, this chapter reports the top line observations of an initial exploration of the preparedness for practice of recent graduates of a Public Relations (PR) course at a post-1992 United Kingdom (UK) Higher Education Institution (HEI). Preparedness for practice is chosen as a conceptual lens (as preparedness for the uncertainty of practice) because HEIs frequently promise it. Using a Bourdieusian framework, preparedness is considered in relation to habitus-field match and HE performance as capital-added in habitus transformation. The chapter offers a complementary way of considering the dynamic between educator and recent graduate agency and how that might be applied when studying course and student performance, designing curricula and developing appropriate ‘signature pedagogies’, especially for those HE actors tasked with delivering against the ‘promise’ of graduate preparedness. In considering preparedness for practice as a performative function of HE, the chapter is located in wider societal debates about the ‘worth’ of HE and offers insight for educators of future PR practitioners.

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How Strategic Communication Shapes Value and Innovation in Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-716-4

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