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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2021

Janne J. Salovaara and Katriina Soini

The purpose of this paper is to expand the competence-led structuring and understanding of sustainability education by analysing the practices of professional individuals…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to expand the competence-led structuring and understanding of sustainability education by analysing the practices of professional individuals who have completed university education geared to the development of sustainability change-makers.

Design/methodology/approach

The research scope was initially on examining professional practices following the boundary work theory. Social practice theory was used as a methodological approach in conducting and analysing thematic interviews with 19 sustainability-focused master’s programme alumni. The interviews were analysed against the theoretical framework while also noting findings that fell outside of this framework.

Findings

A framework for understanding materials, competences and meanings of practices connected to the professional field of sustainability was introduced. The framework suggests that in the practices of sustainability-educated professionals, meanings emerge as a top priority and are conveyed using position-based materials and various complexes of competency.

Research limitations/implications

The authors suggest that boundary theory informs well the emergence of the professional field of sustainability, and the utilisation of a practice theory furthers the understanding of sustainability professionalism and its education.

Practical implications

The authors’ suggest that practice theory could thus provide deeper insights on how sustainability science alumni use their education after graduation, how they practice their profession and in return offer applicable reflections to sustainability education.

Originality/value

Research using practice theory in reflection on sustainability education and the professional practice of sustainability has not been widely conducted and in the authors’ opinion brings value to the education and practice of sustainability and to the research of sustainability education.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 22 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2021

Alirat Olayinka Agboola, Oluwasola Rebecca Jasper and Amamata Larai Zakari

This paper examines the effects of non-professionals' involvements in real estate service provision on real estate agency practice in Ibadan Nigeria, in order to provide…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper examines the effects of non-professionals' involvements in real estate service provision on real estate agency practice in Ibadan Nigeria, in order to provide information that could enhance real estate agency practice in the country.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were gathered through questionnaire administration on a total sample of 232 respondents comprising 82 estate surveyors and valuers, 100 non-professional estate agents and 25 real estate agency service consumers each from the respective clients of the two groups. A respondent-driven sampling (RDS) technique was adopted for data collection and was particularly useful in accessing non-professionals with characteristically less identifiable organizational structure. Data were analysed using mean scores on a Likert type scale while Spearman rank correlation was used to compare and establish if significant differences exist between the perceptions of clients of professionals and non-professionals on the services provided.

Findings

This study revealed that while the involvement of non-professionals in real estate agency practice deprives professionals of opportunities for legitimate earnings and is attributed to incidences of fraudulent transactions in the market, non-professionals often also serve as facilitators of transactions for the professionals. Hence, there seems to be a symbiotic relationship between the two groups and also a tacit validation of the involvement of the former by the latter.

Originality/value

This work contributes to and extends the body of knowledge on non-professionals' involvement in real estate professional practice by providing insights into the effects of activities of individuals who are not members of the real estate profession on real estate agency professional practice, particularly in the context of an emergent and less transparent market.

Details

Property Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article
Publication date: 23 October 2007

Stephen L. Mueller

The purpose of this study is to test two possible explanations for persistent income disparity between male and female self‐employed professionals. First, men are more…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to test two possible explanations for persistent income disparity between male and female self‐employed professionals. First, men are more likely than women to be motivated by the potential for high income to establish a professional practice. Second, men are more likely than women to adopt a thinking‐over‐feeling cognitive decision‐making style.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a gender role/career motivation model to develop a set of hypotheses that explain observed gender‐based income disparity among self‐employed professionals. Hypotheses were tested using multivariate regression analysis with data drawn from a large‐scale national survey of male and female veterinarians in private practice.

Findings

Male veterinarians showed less empathy toward their clients and were more likely to use a thinking‐over‐feeling decision‐making style than were female veterinarians. Also, practice income was greater for male veterinarians with high client empathy (CE) and feeling‐over‐thinking decision‐making style than for male veterinarians with low CE and thinking‐over‐feeling decision‐making style. However, there was no significant difference in practice income between female veterinarians with high CE and feeling‐over‐thinking decision‐making style and female veterinarians with low CE and thinking‐over‐feeling decision‐making style.

Research limitations/implications

While this study was limited to American veterinarians, future research on income disparity should be expanded to include other self‐employed professionals and/or other national settings.

Originality/value

This study contributes to research on gender‐based income disparity among self‐employed professionals by examining underlying factors that potentially contribute to these differences such as motives for establishing the practice and the practice owner's decision‐making style.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

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Article
Publication date: 15 February 2013

Bonnie Slade

This paper aims to examine the professional learning of rural police officers.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the professional learning of rural police officers.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative case study involved interviews and focus groups with 34 police officers in Northern Scotland. The interviews and focus groups were transcribed and analysed, drawing on practice‐based and sociomaterial learning theories, by members of the research team.

Findings

The two key skills for effective rural policing were mobilising available human and material resources in the moment, and learning how to police and live in a rural community. The professional learning of rural police is spatial, emergent, embodied and deeply enmeshed in specificities, and is developed through interactions between human and non‐human actors.

Practical implications

This paper argues that, in order to understand professional learning, it is imperative to examine how work practices are fully entangled in social and material relations.

Originality/value

Applying sociomaterial approaches to issues of professional learning can illuminate previously obscured actors and gives a fuller picture of how professional practice is developed, sustained and modified. Learning is conceived as attuning to available knowledge resources and drawing on the knowledge strategies that are the most productive in the moment. The issues raised in this paper pertain to other professionals working in rural areas, and more generally to the theoretical framing of professional practice.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 15 May 2019

Sara Smith, Uttara Karnik, Karen Kendall, Abigail Pugh, Kelvin Robson, Nabeel Salmons and Martin Khechara

Continual professional development is essential to foster and enhance professionals’ abilities. A wide variety of methods have been adopted to support professional

Abstract

Purpose

Continual professional development is essential to foster and enhance professionals’ abilities. A wide variety of methods have been adopted to support professional learning for healthcare professions but many still focus upon a need to update knowledge and the learning of isolated competencies for practice. The purpose of this paper is to report upon a collaborative partnership that enabled the reframing of a professional development course away from this objectivist epistemology to foster pedagogically appropriate approaches nurturing the development of the knowledge and skills required for extended practice in specimen dissection.

Design/methodology/approach

An action research approach informed this study which drew upon aspects of simulated learning, “creative play” and “hands-on” practice to nurture development of the knowledge and mastery of essential skills required for extended practice in dissection. A questionnaire allowed the gathering of quantitative and qualitative data from delegates. Open coding of delegate free-text responses enabled thematic analysis of the data.

Findings

Delegates reported upon a positive learning and teaching experience providing them with a unique opportunity to develop the essential skills and knowledge required to enhance their extended practice. Four key themes were identified from delegate feedback: legitimacy of learning experience; safe-space for learning; confidence as a practitioner; and professional and social interactions.

Originality/value

Research into skill development in this field is currently lacking. Findings highlight the value of a creative approach to professional development which enables individuals to master the skills required for practice. It also underlines the importance and value of collaborative partnerships. As allied health professionals advance and extend their roles professional development must move away from the didactic delivery of isolated topics and ensure that it offers legitimate learning experiences allowing skill development and technique mastery alongside knowledge enhancement.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2018

Brahm Norwich

The purpose of this paper is to examine variations within lesson study (LS) practices and their connections with related traditions: teacher research/enquiry approaches…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine variations within lesson study (LS) practices and their connections with related traditions: teacher research/enquiry approaches, professional development models, professional learning communities and group problem-solving approaches. Questions are addressed about the relationships between different professional learning approaches in terms of definitions and frameworks.

Design/methodology/approach

Academic databases and website sources were searched in a purposive way to identify 20 practices associated with these traditions for comparative analysis.

Findings

A conceptual framework consisting of eight dimensions was constructed to account for the variations within and between these professional learning traditions: for instance, about the settings in which the practices take place, the purposes of the practices and the specific procedures involved. By illustrating how specific practices fitted within this framework it is concluded that the variations within the LS tradition are wide enough to make it difficult to identify a set of necessary and sufficient features of LS to distinguish LS practices from the other non-LS professional learning practices. Reasons are also given for considering whether a polythetic type of definition of professional learning/development practices might be constructed.

Research limitations/implications

The possibility for a more systematic review of professional learning approaches for the construction of a conceptual framework is discussed.

Practical implications

Ways in which this kind of conceptualisation can be useful in promoting clarity about professional learning practices and in developing these practices are discussed.

Originality/value

The originality of this paper lies in the construction of a conceptual framework to analyse similarities and differences within and between various professional learning traditions.

Details

International Journal for Lesson and Learning Studies, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-8253

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Article
Publication date: 13 May 2014

Tom Bourner and Penny Simpson

This paper is about action learning and the pedagogy of professional doctorates. The purpose of this paper is to explore the pedagogical problems of the relatively new…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper is about action learning and the pedagogy of professional doctorates. The purpose of this paper is to explore the pedagogical problems of the relatively new professional doctorates and consider whether action learning offers potential solutions.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual paper seeks to answer the question: how good is the fit between the learning processes of action learning and the learning goals of professional doctorates?

Findings

The main conclusions of the paper are that action learning can support the learning of students enroled on professional doctorates by helping them realise the following three key learning outcomes, namely, the capacity to contribute to the advancement of knowledge, that is relevant to professional practice; their own personal and professional capabilities as practitioners; and their capacity to bring about change that directly enhances professional practice, i.e. they can make a direct contribution to professional practice, e.g. through some successful project that they undertake.

Research limitations/implications

While this paper is not based on research, the main implication is that action learning can offer a valuable pedagogic approach in supporting the learning of professional doctoral candidates towards their goal of making an original contribution to the advancement of professional practice.

Practical implications

A second implication is the need for many of those university academics responsible for leading and managing professional doctorates to become more familiar with the theory and practice of action learning. A third implication is the appreciation of the need to weigh up cost against the benefits of using action learning as a pedagogic process on professional doctorates.

Originality/value

This conceptual paper is original as it explores the fit of action learning with pedagogic issues of professional doctorates.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-based Learning, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

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Article
Publication date: 18 February 2021

Jenny Bronstein and Yosef Solomon

This study examines the information practices of Israeli lawyers highlighting the central role that information plays in professional communities of practice. Examining…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines the information practices of Israeli lawyers highlighting the central role that information plays in professional communities of practice. Examining the information practices of lawyers characterizes the information behavior of this community of practice.

Design/methodology/approach

Information practices are those recurrent practices related to actively seeking information for a variety of sources socially and contextually situated within members of a professional community. Twenty semi-structured interviews were carried out with lawyers in Israel that investigated the different ways by which lawyers interact with information in their professional work. Data collected in the interviews were analyzed using a grounded theory approach.

Findings

Findings from the content analysis of the interviews revealed three main themes: information assimilation, networking and self-promotion and content creation that encompass a wide variety of information practices related to seeking information related to a case, preparing and presenting a case, providing support for the client, collaborating with other members of the professional community and promoting their professional practice.

Originality/value

This study provides an innovating perspective of the ways by which an information-rich community of practice engages with information, solves problems, build social connections and creates new content.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 29 June 2020

Adebayo Serge Francois Koukpaki and Kweku Adams

The purpose of this paper is to explore ways in which learning and development (L&D) professionals use reflective practice to promote the function of L&D and their own…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore ways in which learning and development (L&D) professionals use reflective practice to promote the function of L&D and their own professional growth. The claim that L&D practitioners need to develop their reflective ability to make sense of their own practice is well-argued in the literature, but few studies focus on an in-depth individual self-reflection and its impact on professional growth.

Design/methodology/approach

An autoethnography and reflective practice design was deployed. The data was collected by sending a semi-structured, pre-set question as a ‘reflective conversation’ to an L&D manager and a 10-hour tape recording of personal reflection over three months.[AQ1] Data was sanitised, transcribed and edited, and a narrative data analysis method was used to analyse the data developed into reflective narratives.

Findings

The authors find that reflective practice emerges through gradual reflective patterns that define the circumstances surrounding the reflection, the content, exploration and interpretation and confirming the fulfilling of the reflection.

Originality/value

This paper offers the journey of an L&D manager working in the hotel industry in India. Through a set of reflective practices, including introspection and reflexivity, the manager considers the changes she has experienced. The paper contributes to the literature on reflective practice based on promoting the L&D function as an essential part of the horizontal integration of human resource management in organisations. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 44 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

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Article
Publication date: 26 September 2019

Helen Thacker, Ann Anka and Bridget Penhale

The purpose of this paper is to consider the importance of professional curiosity and partnership work in safeguarding adults from serious harm, abuse and neglect.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider the importance of professional curiosity and partnership work in safeguarding adults from serious harm, abuse and neglect.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on a range of materials including: review of published materials in relation to professional curiosity, reports from adult serious case reviews (SCRs) and safeguarding adult reviews (SARs); relevant materials drawn from the SAR Library, thematic reviews of SARs and Google searches; observations from practice and experience. It also refers to the relevant academic literature.

Findings

Lessons from SCRs and SARs show that a lack of professional curiosity and poor coordination of support can lead to poor assessments and intervention measures that can fail to support those at risk of harm and abuse. There are a number of barriers to professionals practicing with curiosity. Working in partnership enhances the likelihood that professional curiosity will flourish.

Practical implications

There are clear implications for improving practice by increasing professional curiosity amongst professionals. The authors argue that there is a scope to improve professional curiosity by utilising and developing existing partnerships, and ultimately to help reduce the number of deaths and incidents of serious harm.

Originality/value

The paper considers the importance of employing professional curiosity and partnership work in safeguarding adults’ practice, so enabling practitioners to better safeguard adults at risk of abuse and neglect.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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