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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2007

Steven P. Camicia

Banks (1994) names prejudice reduction as one of five dimensions of multicultural education. Although children develop prejudicial beliefs, attitudes, and values at young…

Abstract

Banks (1994) names prejudice reduction as one of five dimensions of multicultural education. Although children develop prejudicial beliefs, attitudes, and values at young ages, research demonstrates that when multicultural knowledge and values are combined with intergroup contact, prejudice is often reduced. In this article, I connect multiple literatures in order to present an overarching picture of prejudice and its reduction in classrooms. First, I describe some negative impacts of prejudice and how prejudice develops at very young ages. Second, utilizing another of Banks’s dimensions of multicultural education, I describe the knowledge construction process as a necessary factor in prejudice reduction. Finally, intergroup contact theory and complex instruction are described as a guide for reducing prejudice in classrooms.

Details

Social Studies Research and Practice, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1933-5415

Article
Publication date: 11 October 2022

Mary Hogue, Deborah Erdos Knapp, Jessica A. Peck and Velvet Weems-Landingham

Little research directly examines leader self-development among marginalized workers. The authors offer a framework to explain the role of internalized prejudice in…

Abstract

Purpose

Little research directly examines leader self-development among marginalized workers. The authors offer a framework to explain the role of internalized prejudice in limiting leader self-development, and the authors use that framework to suggest organizational interventions aimed at enhancing leader self-development among marginalized workers.

Design/methodology/approach

The framework is grounded in the incompleteness thesis with its attention to the mutual shaping of culture and mind, and the interventions are drawn from principles of social movements with their focus on changing culture and the minds of individuals. The framework and interventions address the role of status in internalized prejudice.

Findings

Status-related experiences in culture shape status-related thoughts in the mind, resulting in internalized prejudice. Internalized prejudice reduces the status-related behavior of leader self-development, which serves to shape status in the culture. This repeats in an ongoing, recursive process that can be disrupted through organizational interventions. The social movement principles of common purpose and networking can provide new status-related experiences to reduce internalized prejudice, and habit-breaking can stop automatic self-limiting behaviors that can arise from internalized prejudice.

Originality/value

By focusing on status, the authors provide a framework that allows integration of literature across marginalized groups, providing a guide for understanding both commonality and uniqueness of experience. The authors bring principles of social movement to the discussion of leader self-development among marginalized workers as a guide for developing organizational interventions.

Details

Management Decision, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 14 October 2011

Shannon K. Carter and Fernando I. Rivera

Previous research indicates that racial and ethnic prejudice continues to be prevalent in U.S. society; however, the social-psychological processes of prejudice are not…

Abstract

Previous research indicates that racial and ethnic prejudice continues to be prevalent in U.S. society; however, the social-psychological processes of prejudice are not fully understood. Furthermore, much research on prejudice focuses on white against black prejudice, at the exclusion of other minority groups. The purpose of this chapter is to explore white prejudice against Latinos using in-depth interview data with college students. Findings indicate that many participants describe instances in which they felt prejudice, yet they use creative mechanisms to justify their prejudice or construct it as something other than prejudice. Mostly, participants described their own prejudice as a “special type” of prejudice – including trait prejudice, situational prejudice, reciprocal prejudice, and recovered prejudice – that is distinct from ordinary prejudice. By describing their own prejudice as a “special type,” participants are able to construct themselves as nonprejudiced individuals while simultaneously acknowledging their prejudice.

Details

Studies in Symbolic Interaction
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-156-5

Article
Publication date: 23 August 2022

Helen LaVan and Yvette P. Lopez

This paper examines recent research on prejudice in the workplace by comparing the domains of management, psychology and sociology. It seeks to make recommendations…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper examines recent research on prejudice in the workplace by comparing the domains of management, psychology and sociology. It seeks to make recommendations regarding future research directions in light of significant social movements that impact on prejudice and discrimination.

Design/methodology/approach

The design is built on an interdisciplinary literature review, drawing from research in management, psychology and sociology. In total, 450 recent articles were examined. These factors related to the individual, group and organizational/societal level of analysis to determine what we know about prejudice and discrimination in the workplace and what we do not know.

Findings

This study’s findings show that each domain of management, psychology and sociology makes distinctive contributions, thus providing scholars with a holistic understanding of prejudice and discrimination in the workplace.

Research limitations/implications

The use of content analysis, using both automated and manual coding and chi-square analysis, allows for a deep understanding of the existing research in all three of the domains. This approach allows for reliability and replicability. Noted are the relative absence of intersectionality, immutability and salience.

Practical implications

Recommendations regarding future research directions in light of significant social movements that impact prejudicial attitudes and discriminatory behaviors at all three levels are provided.

Originality/value

The study utilized a novel approach in examining prejudice in the workplace taking a grounded theory perspective, allowing the existing literature to shape the focus and results of the study. Using NVivo allowed for drilling down into the content of the articles to identify minor and major points of discussion relating to prejudice.

Details

Management Decision, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 December 2020

Tala Abuhussein, Tamer Koburtay and Jawad Syed

This paper aims to use Ryff’s (1989) eudaimonic view to examine how prejudice toward female workers affects their psychological well-being.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to use Ryff’s (1989) eudaimonic view to examine how prejudice toward female workers affects their psychological well-being.

Design/methodology/approach

Responses were collected through face-to-face semi-structured interviews along with open-ended questions in a paper-based survey. In total, 24 female workers across various organizations in Jordan participated in this study.

Findings

The results show how prejudice against female workers can affect the six dimensions of their eudaimonic psychological well-being (Ryff, 1989). Specifically, the results show that prejudice may push women to work harder to prove they are capable of achieving their goals and, as a result, it may positively enhance their self-acceptance, sense of growth, purpose in life and autonomy. However, the study also shows that prejudice against women negatively affects their environmental mastery and relationships with others.

Practical implications

This study may help create greater sensitivity and awareness about gender prejudice and its effects on female workers’ psychological well-being. It also highlights women’s resilience which may be deemed valuable to develop women in leadership roles in organizations.

Originality/value

This study offers a fresh and nuanced understanding of the impact of gender prejudice on female workers’ psychological well-being.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal , vol. 36 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 July 2019

Michel Dion

The purpose of this paper is to see to what extent Hans-Georg Gadamer’s hermeneutic philosophy could be used to unveil how corporate discourse about financial crimes (in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to see to what extent Hans-Georg Gadamer’s hermeneutic philosophy could be used to unveil how corporate discourse about financial crimes (in codes of ethics) is closely linked to the process of understanding.

Design/methodology/approach

Corporate ethical discourse of 20 business corporations will be analyzed, as it is conveyed within their codes of ethics. The companies came from five countries (USA, Canada, France, Switzerland and Brazil). In the explanatory study, the following industries were represented (two companies by industry): aircrafts/trains, military, airlines, recreational vehicles, soft drinks, cigarettes, pharmaceuticals, beauty products, telecommunications and banks.

Findings

Historically-based prejudices in three basic narrative strategies (silence, chosen items and detailed discussion) about financial crimes are related to the mindset, to the basic outlook on corporate self-interest or to an absolutizing attitude.

Research limitations/implications

The historically-based prejudices that have been identified in this explanatory study should be analyzed in longitudinal studies.

Practical implications

The historically-based prejudices that have been identified in this explanatory study should be analyzed in longitudinal studies. Historically-based prejudices could be strengthened by the way corporate codes of ethics deal with financial crimes. They could, thus, have a deep impact on the organizational culture in the long-run.

Originality/value

The paper analyzes the way corporate codes of ethics use given narrative strategies to address financial crimes issues. It also unveils historically-based prejudices that follow from the choice of one or the other narrative strategy.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 June 2017

Hans-Joachim Wolfram

Modern prejudice was examined as a potential predictor of overestimating proportions of minority employees in gender-typed occupations. Strength of conjunction error was…

Abstract

Purpose

Modern prejudice was examined as a potential predictor of overestimating proportions of minority employees in gender-typed occupations. Strength of conjunction error was considered as an indicator of distorted perceptions of these proportions. Furthermore, the purpose of this paper is to investigate whether the association between modern prejudice and strength of conjunction error was weaker for gender-untypical than for gender-typical targets.

Design/methodology/approach

Modern prejudice was considered as a predictor of overestimations of black female employees in Study 1 (n=183) and black female older employees in Study 2 (n=409). Data were collected using internet-mediated questionnaires.

Findings

In Study 1, modern racism, but not modern sexism, was associated with greater strength of conjunction error when respondents were presented with gender-typical targets. In Study 2, using a sample scoring higher on modern prejudice than in Study 1, modern racism, but not modern sexism and modern ageism, was associated with greater strength of conjunction error, irrespective of target occupation. Furthermore, there was an unexpected association between lower sexism and greater strength of conjunction error for gender-typical targets, but not for gender-untypical targets.

Research limitations/implications

The findings lend support to the ethnic-prominence hypothesis in that modern racism, but not modern sexism or modern ageism, was associated with greater strength of conjunction error. Furthermore, empirical evidence suggests that target non-prototypicality can dilute the effect of modern prejudice on strength of conjunction error.

Originality/value

This is one of the rare studies examining attitudes and conjunction error in a work-relevant context, thereby bridging the gap between social cognition and applied psychology.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 36 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

Yuka Fujimoto and Charmine E.J. Härtel

The authors propose that the nature of prejudice differs across cultures. A model is introduced that proposes that the interpersonal perspective associated with…

2021

Abstract

The authors propose that the nature of prejudice differs across cultures. A model is introduced that proposes that the interpersonal perspective associated with individualist cultures (Westerners) leads to interpersonal prejudices, whereas the intergroup perspective associated with collectivist cultures (Easterners) leads to intergroup prejudices. These prejudices, in turn, are argued to impact on the outcomes of individuals working in intercultural teams. An organisational diversity climate of openness fostered by diversity oriented HRM and the combined use of individualist and collectivist HRM policies and practices is proposed to minimize the negative effects of such prejudices can be minimized.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Yuka Fujimoto and Charmine E.J. Härtel

Increasingly, organizations in the Asia‐Pacific region are recognizing the importance of cross‐cultural management to the sustainability of their competitive edge…

5194

Abstract

Purpose

Increasingly, organizations in the Asia‐Pacific region are recognizing the importance of cross‐cultural management to the sustainability of their competitive edge. Although the literature is replete with cross‐cultural studies of individualism and collectivism, little information is available on the factors that foster effective individualist–collectivist interaction (ICI) within organizations. This paper attempts to provide a theoretical description of individualists and collectivists at the individual level of analysis, which offers specific testable hypotheses about the effect of self‐representation on prejudice between individualists and collectivists (ICs).

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, a theoretical model is presented in which intergroup prejudices and interpersonal prejudices mediate the effects of ICI and bicultural orientation toward cross‐cultural experiences and, in which, the dissimilarity openness of the climate moderates the level and outcome of prejudices flowing from ICI.

Findings

The model depicts that the outcomes of ICI are mediated by the intergroup prejudices of collectivists and the interpersonal prejudices of individualists, which are moderated by the extent of diversity‐oriented HRM policies and practices and individuals’ orientation to cross‐cultural experiences. When workforces become culturally diverse, organizations should modify HRM practices to enable the full use of the range of skills and talents available from the diversity, and to ensure affective and behavioral costs are minimized. As globalization and international competition will continue to increase, organizations including those in the Asia‐Pacific region, should seriously re‐evaluate their HRM policies to adapt and take advantage of an increasingly culturally diverse workforce.

Originality/value

The model provides a useful basis upon which organization researchers and practitioners can base their respective agendas.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2013

Khurram Parvez Raja

The unfair prejudice remedy as contained in s.290 of the Companies Ordinance 1984 entitles a member with a shareholding of twenty percent or more to petition to the court…

Abstract

Purpose

The unfair prejudice remedy as contained in s.290 of the Companies Ordinance 1984 entitles a member with a shareholding of twenty percent or more to petition to the court for suitable and appropriate court orders in circumstances where the member has been unfairly prejudiced. The major difficulties and complexities emerging from the examination of s.290 relates to (but not limited to) locus standi, high cost of litigation due to the length and complexity of the unfair prejudice litigations, lacunas in share valuation, cumbersome court procedures, low quality of pleadings, unethical conduct of lawyers, etc. The purpose of this paper is to shed light on these topical questions. It is contended that the legislature and the courts will have a strong role to play in providing clarity and certainty to the law.

Design/methodology/approach

The first part provides a brief overview of the statutory unfair prejudice remedy contained in s.290. The second part discusses the concept of unfair prejudice in the United Kingdom and its difficulties. The third part provides a framework of the unfair prejudice remedies available under s.290 and discusses the inefficiencies and shortcomings of the remedy.

Findings

This article concludes that the statutory unfair prejudice remedy in Pakistan is inefficient and inadequate to redress personal and corporate wrongs in an unfair prejudice petition. The deficiencies of the statutory unfair prejudice remedy pose a challenge to the minority shareholders and the overall corporate governance and corporate law regime in Pakistan.

Originality/value

This article sheds light on the complexity and difficulty of the statutory unfair prejudice remedy, as contained in s.290 of the Companies Ordinance 1984 from a comparative law perspective.

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