Search results

1 – 10 of over 68000

Abstract

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Article
Publication date: 29 July 2010

Diane Crone, Phil Tyson and Jessica Holley

This paper provides a summary of the current state of knowledge on the use of physical activity as an adjunctive treatment in schizophrenia. There is a well documented…

414

Abstract

This paper provides a summary of the current state of knowledge on the use of physical activity as an adjunctive treatment in schizophrenia. There is a well documented relationship between physical activity and mental health, which is reflected in numerous health policy recommendations for practice, in both the promotion of mental health and in the treatment of mental health problems. In schizophrenia, this association is also recognised, and research has suggested that participation in physical activity regimes can have beneficial effects on positive and negative symptoms, psychological well‐being and anxiety and tension. However, a neglected area of research is in the potential for physical activity to remediate the cognitive deficits in schizophrenia. Physical activity has been shown to enhance cognitive function in a wide variety of clinical and non‐clinical populations, however this body of research has not yet extended to schizophrenia populations. The authors argue that this should be a future priority.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 14 December 2018

Julie M. Maier and Shannon L. Jette

To examine the exercise experiences of women with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) in order to highlight the complex relationship between mental illness and physical

Abstract

Purpose

To examine the exercise experiences of women with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) in order to highlight the complex relationship between mental illness and physical activity, as it intersects with other identities and social locations (e.g., gender and sexuality) as well as other mental health conditions (e.g., eating disorders and exercise addiction).

Method

Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 14 women who self-identify as having OCD. A thematic analysis was conducted to understand the role of physical activity in the participants’ lives.

Findings

The participants experience holistic benefits from being physically active. At the same time, however, their symptoms of OCD and related disorders (e.g., eating disorders) make it challenging to be physically active in meaningful and healthy ways.

Implications

Public health messages promoting exercise as a form of therapy must take into account the complex relationship between physical activity and mental illness. Additional research and programing is also needed in order to help women with mental health issues be physically active in safe and enjoyable ways.

Content available
Article
Publication date: 12 July 2022

Megan Jansen, Chloe Chapman, Thomas Richardson, Peter Elliott and Ron Roberts

Previous studies in the field have highlighted a bidirectional link between mental health and physical health. Students may be at a higher risk of both mental and physical

Abstract

Purpose

Previous studies in the field have highlighted a bidirectional link between mental health and physical health. Students may be at a higher risk of both mental and physical health problems because of unhealthy lifestyle behaviours and the commencement of university occurring at the same mean age of onset for many psychiatric disorders. This study aims to examine how physical health variables influence changes in mental health symptoms, and vice versa, over time, in a sample of British undergraduate students.

Design/methodology/approach

A longitudinal design over a one-year time period. A national sample of 430 British undergraduate students completed measures of mental health and physical health online at up to four time-points across their first two years of university.

Findings

General physical health and energy and fatigue predicted more severe depression, anxiety, stress and poorer general mental health over time. Depression and stress predicted poorer physical functioning over time. Greater anxiety predicted poorer general health and more severe pain over time. General mental health was not predictive of general physical health. Overall, poor general physical health appears to exacerbate mental health symptoms in students to a greater extent than mental health problems lead to a deterioration in physical health.

Originality/value

This study adds a longitudinal design to a field that is usually cross-sectional, as well as a lack of consideration of how this relationship may differ within student samples. Early interventions should integrate physical and mental well-being rather than focus on any single health-related behaviour.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2004

Martin Jones and Carol O'Beney

The physical health benefits of exercise are well established but there is also growing research evidence of links between physical activity and mental health benefits…

Abstract

The physical health benefits of exercise are well established but there is also growing research evidence of links between physical activity and mental health benefits, including mood elevation, better cognitive functioning and improved self‐perception, self‐esteem and selfefficacy. Physical activity has also been shown to enhance the effectiveness of psychological therapies and to have a role in improving quality of life and symptom management for people with a wide range of mental health problems. Physical activity has a double benefit, since people with mental health problems are also at increased risk of a range of physical health problems, including cardiovascular disease, endocrine disorders and obesity. However referral to a physical activity specialist is rarely available in psychiatric settings. This paper gives two examples of how provision of physical activity facilities and programmes staffed by qualified specialists can contribute towards improving mental health and quality of life for people with mental health problems.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Book part
Publication date: 16 June 2017

Dafna Merom and Robert Korycinski

The mid-1990s marked a paradigm shift in the way physical activity is promoted, and walking is now considered the most suitable type of physical activity for widespread…

Abstract

The mid-1990s marked a paradigm shift in the way physical activity is promoted, and walking is now considered the most suitable type of physical activity for widespread promotion. Accurate measurement underpins public health practice, hence the aims of this chapter are to: (1) provide a typology for the measurement of walking; (2) review methods to assess walking; (3) present challenges in defining walking measures; (4) identify issues in selecting instruments for the evaluation of walking and (5) discuss current efforts to overcome measurement challenges and methodological limitations. The taxonomy of walking indicates that secondary purpose walking is a more complex set of behaviours than primary purpose walks. It has many purposes and no specific domain or intensity, may lack regularity, and therefore poses greater measurement challenges. Objective measurement methods, such as accelerometers, pedometers, smartphones and other electronic devices, have shown good approximation for walking energy expenditure, but are indirect methods of walking assessment. Global Positioning System technology, the ‘Smartmat’ and radio-frequency identification tags are potential objective methods that can distinguish walkers, but also require complex analysis, are costly, and still need their measurement properties corroborated. Subjective direct methods, such as questionnaires, diaries and direct observation, provide the richest information on walking, especially short-term diaries, such as trip records and time use records, and are particularly useful for assessing secondary purpose walking. A unifying measure for health research, surveillance and health promotion would strongly advance the understanding of the impact of walking on health.

Details

Walking
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-628-0

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 May 2022

Shaoxiong Fu, Jie Fang, Zhao Cai, Eric Tze Kuan Lim, Chee-Wee Tan and Haiping Yang

Motivated by the need for research on the relationship between health app usage and health-related outcomes in the form of health status and life satisfaction, this study…

Abstract

Purpose

Motivated by the need for research on the relationship between health app usage and health-related outcomes in the form of health status and life satisfaction, this study builds on self-regulation theory to construct a research model for elucidating how health app quality affects health information literacy, health app usage and physical activity.

Design/methodology/approach

To empirically validate the proposed research model, a large-scale questionnaire survey on health app usage was administered on a sample of 6,948 respondents recruited from a university in China. Structural equation modeling was employed for data analysis.

Findings

Empirical findings demonstrate that health app quality positively affects self-regulation with respect to health app usage, health information literacy and physical activity. Taken together, these self-regulated behaviors drive health-related outcomes for health status and life satisfaction.

Originality/value

This study advances extant literature on health app usage through the application of self-regulation theory to investigate the effects of technological interventions in healthcare. Findings offer practical implications for how health apps can be leveraged to realize positive health-related outcomes.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2022

Victoria E. Warburton, Lee C. Beaumont and Krystal C.M. Bishop

The authors applied a multidimensional conceptual lens that incorporated physical, emotional, social, intellectual and spiritual health dimensions to explore…

Abstract

Purpose

The authors applied a multidimensional conceptual lens that incorporated physical, emotional, social, intellectual and spiritual health dimensions to explore pre-adolescent children's understanding of health and what it means to be healthy.

Design/methodology/approach

Forty-six children aged 9–11 years old completed a short questionnaire about their understanding of health and what it means to be healthy. Data analysis was completed through a deductive analysis applying a multidimensional conceptual lens and an inductive thematic analysis of the content of children's responses to each question.

Findings

The analysis of children's understandings of health and being healthy both revealed five common themes: Being well, physically active, fit and healthy; Healthy eating and body composition; Physical activity examples; Physical activity characteristics; and Unsure or ambiguous. Across both questions the majority of responses reflected the physical dimension of health, with only a few references to the social and emotional dimensions. There was no evidence of the intellectual or spiritual dimensions of health in children's responses to either question.

Practical implications

The authors’ data suggest that the plateau in adolescent UK children's trajectory of understandings originates earlier in childhood, with children aged 9–11 showing a similarly limited understanding of health and being healthy as UK adolescents. Moreover, this focus on the physical dimension is narrower than previously considered as it is restricted to the movement category of this dimension only.

Originality/value

The authors’ findings have implications for the timing and focus of health education interventions for children.

Details

Health Education, vol. 122 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 July 2021

Emily Samuels and Nicola Moran

Physical health inequalities and mortality rates are higher amongst individuals with severe mental illness (SMI), including among forensic populations, than the general…

Abstract

Purpose

Physical health inequalities and mortality rates are higher amongst individuals with severe mental illness (SMI), including among forensic populations, than the general population. This paper aims to explore the experiences of individuals accessing primary health care following discharge from secure services, and the practitioners who support them.

Design/methodology/approach

Face-to-face qualitative interviews were conducted with service users (n = 4) and mental health practitioners (n = 4) within a forensic community mental health team in one NHS Trust in England in 2019. Data were analysed using the Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis.

Findings

Four super-ordinate themes emerged: perceived importance of physical health, agency, responsibility and relationships. Service users mostly saw themselves as passive recipients of health care and prioritised their mental health over their physical health. Close working relationships meant that mental health practitioners were often the first contact for service users with any health issue and thus felt a sense of responsibility for their physical health care. Service users who did access primary care reported that consistency of professional, feeling understood and listened to without judgement or stigma were important.

Practical implications

Interventions for service users that include practicalities and strategies to facilitate independence in physical health care, and collaborative working between primary care and forensic mental health services, are encouraged.

Originality/value

This study highlights some of the unique challenges in forensics around improving physical health outcomes for individuals with SMI.

Details

The Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2003

Alfred Rütten, Heiko Ziemainz, Karim Abu‐Omar and Nicole Groth

Explores the relationships between the perceived quality of physical education lessons, the perceived quality of opportunities for physical activity in a residential area…

1654

Abstract

Explores the relationships between the perceived quality of physical education lessons, the perceived quality of opportunities for physical activity in a residential area, and the physical fitness and health of pupils attending Grades 5 and 9 in Germany. The data were collected from 300 pupils in a community in Saxony, using a standardized questionnaire and a standard test of sporting ability. Results indicated that girls evaluated the opportunities for physical activity in the residential area more critically than boys. Multivariate analysis showed that the subjective health status of pupils was associated with good physical fitness and a good perception of opportunities for physical activity in the residential area, but not with the perceived quality of physical education lessons. These results provide evidence that a relationship between the urban environment and physical activity exists, and that the promotion of physical activity for pupils can benefit from intersectoral approaches.

Details

Health Education, vol. 103 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 68000