Search results

1 – 10 of over 11000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 28 August 2021

Komal Nagar

Moving beyond the concept of congruence between celebrity image and brand image, this study explores a new domain in which to investigate the match-up hypothesis…

Abstract

Purpose

Moving beyond the concept of congruence between celebrity image and brand image, this study explores a new domain in which to investigate the match-up hypothesis. Specifically, this study aims to understand the extent to which consumers engage in more indulgent behavior when participants are primed with a celebrity with a certain perceived lifestyle.

Design/methodology/approach

Two independent experiments were undertaken to observe consumer reactions to advertisements using celebrities as priming stimulus. Experiment 1 featured a 2 (perceived celebrity lifestyle) × 3 (celebrity persuasion style) between-subjects design, while a follow-up study featured a 2 (celebrity’s on-screen portrayal) × 3 (celebrity persuasion style) between-subjects factorial design.

Findings

Results support the proposition that celebrities cause priming effects such that consumers’ attitude and willingness to spend (WTS) on the endorsed brand depends on their perception of the celebrity’s lifestyle. Participants exposed to a perceived high-flamboyant-lifestyle celebrity had a more positive attitude toward the endorsed brand and were more willing to spend money when the celebrity used a “spend money” persuasion style than when the celebrity used a “save money” persuasion style in endorsements. Findings of a follow-up study suggest that exposure to a celebrity playing a flamboyant character on-screen was seen to be associated with a positive attitude toward the brand and increased WTS, than exposure to a celebrity playing a less flamboyant character on-screen.

Originality/value

Although effects of person primes are evidenced in the literature, previous studies are silent on the impact of presenting celebrities as priming stimulus. This study extends the idea of priming using a social category that has not been explored before, namely, celebrities and explores the effect that celebrity priming has on activating specific consumer response behavior.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 38 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 21 June 2021

Ida Darmawan, Hao Xu and Jisu Huh

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the differential effects of help-seeking and product-claim direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) on consumers’ attitude toward the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the differential effects of help-seeking and product-claim direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) on consumers’ attitude toward the ad, intention to seek information and intention to see a doctor. This paper also seeks to examine the underlying mechanism of these effects and the moderating role of advertising literacy.

Design/methodology/approach

An online experiment was conducted with 130 adults who experienced narcolepsy symptoms and experimental stimuli promoting a fictitious drug for narcolepsy.

Findings

Help-seeking DTCA generated lower persuasion knowledge activation than product-claim DTCA, resulting in lower skepticism, more favorable attitude toward the ad and higher behavioral intentions. The effects of ad type were stronger among consumers with higher advertising literacy.

Originality/value

This is the first study that provides a thorough examination of the underlying mechanism of the differential effects of help-seeking vs product-claim DTCA as well as the roles of consumers’ advertising literacy on ad outcomes.

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 9 September 2019

Andrew E. Wilson and Peter R. Darke

The authors ask whether individuals tasked with persuading others have distinct and important concerns regarding their occupational stress and well-being. The authors…

Abstract

The authors ask whether individuals tasked with persuading others have distinct and important concerns regarding their occupational stress and well-being. The authors argue that a well-known model from the marketing literature – the persuasion knowledge model (PKM; Friestad & Wright, 1994) – illuminates a number of issues for future study. The authors further argue for a number of extensions to the PKM to account for the persuasion agent’s side of the interaction. Next, the authors consider potential stressors that are distinctive to the persuasion encounter, as well as the strategies that persuasion agents engage to cope. This discussion reveals a number of potential negative consequences for the agents themselves, as well as their employing firms and customers. Finally, the authors present some thoughts on what persuasion agents, their managers, and external regulators can do to mitigate these negative consequences.

Details

Examining the Role of Well-being in the Marketing Discipline
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-946-6

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 29 December 2016

Sophie C. Boerman and Eva A. van Reijmersdal

This chapter provides an overview of what is currently known in the scientific literature about the effects of disclosures of sponsored content on consumers’ responses.

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter provides an overview of what is currently known in the scientific literature about the effects of disclosures of sponsored content on consumers’ responses.

Methodology/approach

We provide a qualitative literature review of 21 empirical studies.

Findings

Awareness of disclosures is rather low, but when consumers are aware of a disclosure, it successfully activates persuasion knowledge and can increase brand memory. The literature shows inconclusive findings with respect to the effects of disclosures on attention paid to sponsored content, critical processing, brand attitudes, and purchase intentions. In addition, the literature shows that modality of the disclosure has no significant effects, but the content of the disclosure, its timing, its duration, receivers’ moods, and their perceptions of the sponsored content or the endorser are important moderators.

Research implications

More research is needed on differences in effects of disclosures in different media and on disclosures of online sponsored content online (e.g., sponsored tweets and vlogs).

Practical implications

This chapter provides advertisers with insights on how disclosures affect the persuasiveness of sponsored content in several media.

Social implications

For legislators, explicit guidelines on how to create effective disclosures of sponsored content are provided. For example, to increase persuasion knowledge, disclosures should be portrayed for at least 3 seconds and if logos are used, they should be accompanied by texts explaining the logo.

Originality/value

This overview is a valuable starting point for future academic research in the domain of disclosure effects and provides insights for advertisers and legislators.

Details

Advertising in New Formats and Media
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-312-9

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 January 2021

Ronit Yitshaki, Eli Gimmon and Susanna Khavul

This study aims to examine the extent to which board size, the use of power by venture capital investors and entrepreneurs’ interpersonal tactics such as persuasion to…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the extent to which board size, the use of power by venture capital investors and entrepreneurs’ interpersonal tactics such as persuasion to sway board decisions, influence the long-term survival of start-ups.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a mixed-methods approach. The quantitative part is based on data collected from 179 chief executive officers (CEOs) of high-tech start-ups community financed by venture capitalists (VCs) in Israel of which 59 did not survive. To achieve a better understanding of these findings, semi-structured interviews with 12 entrepreneurs were conducted.

Findings

Smaller boards were positively associated with venture survival. The use of power by VC investors positively influenced start-up survival. CEO persuasion had a negative effect on venture survival; however, its interaction with board size suggests that it had a lesser effect on very small boards.

Practical implications

Although investors’ control over decision-making contributes to long-term survival, entrepreneurs should be aware of the possible detrimental effects of exercising a high level of persuasion in board processes. The findings also suggest that a small board size is preferable for start-up survival.

Originality/value

Exploring the effect of board processes on venture survival is considered complex. A unique sample of high-technology start-ups consisting of both surviving and failed start-ups was analyzed to explore the effects of persuasion and power in board processes.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 December 2020

Keith S. Jones, Miriam E. Armstrong, McKenna K. Tornblad and Akbar Siami Namin

This study aims to examine how social engineers use persuasion principles during vishing attacks.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine how social engineers use persuasion principles during vishing attacks.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 86 examples of real-world vishing attacks were found in articles and videos. Each example was coded to determine which persuasion principles were present in that attack and how they were implemented, i.e. what specific elements of the attack contributed to the presence of each persuasion principle.

Findings

Authority (A), social proof (S) and distraction (D) were the most widely used persuasion principles in vishing attacks, followed by liking, similarity and deception (L). These four persuasion principles occurred in a majority of vishing attacks, while commitment, reciprocation and consistency (C) did not. Further, certain sets of persuasion principles (i.e. authority, distraction, liking, similarity, and deception and social proof; , authority, commitment, reciprocation, and consistency, distraction, liking, similarity and deception, and social proof; and authority, distraction and social proof) were used more than others. It was noteworthy that despite their similarities, those sets of persuasion principles were implemented in different ways, and certain specific ways of implementing certain persuasion principles (e.g. vishers claiming to have authority over the victim) were quite rare.

Originality/value

To the best of authors’ knowledge, this study is the first to investigate how social engineers use persuasion principles during vishing attacks. As such, it provides important insight into how social engineers implement vishing attacks and lays a critical foundation for future research investigating the psychological aspects of vishing attacks. The present results have important implications for vishing countermeasures and education.

Details

Information & Computer Security, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4961

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 28 December 2020

Nirma Sadamali Jayawardena

The purpose of this theoretical paper is to introduce a conceptual model to investigate e-learning persuasion through gamification elements using the social psychology…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this theoretical paper is to introduce a conceptual model to investigate e-learning persuasion through gamification elements using the social psychology theory of elaboration likelihood model (ELM).

Design/methodology/approach

The author systematically reviewed several theoretical and empirical papers which applied the ELM in various settings. Based on the literature, the author identified six research prepositions which facilitate to investigate e-learning persuasion through gamification.

Findings

This study contributes to the existing literature by identifying an ELM-based conceptual model which can be used to empirically investigate the e-learning persuasion using gamification elements. Accordingly, the central route persuasion could be conducted through argument quality, demographic differences and technology context facilitated through gamification elements. The peripheral route persuasion could be conducted through variables such as source credibility, social presence and message content.

Practical implications

This study contributes important findings to the e-learning research by introducing a conceptual model–based on the social psychology theory of ELM. Thereby, this study introduces a method for the future researchers, to investigate the e-learning persuasion using gamification elements. Further, future researchers can use this model to investigate the e-learning persuasion through gamification in different contexts including primary, secondary and tertiary educational levels.

Originality/value

To the best of the author’s knowledge, this study can be considered as the first theoretical paper which developed an ELM-based conceptual model to investigate the e-learning persuasion through gamification in education context.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 13 June 2020

Fayez Ahmad and Francisco Guzmán

This paper aims to investigate whether a message from a brand with stronger brand equity generates more trust than a message from a brand with lower brand equity, and thus…

Downloads
1003

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate whether a message from a brand with stronger brand equity generates more trust than a message from a brand with lower brand equity, and thus is more likely to encourage consumers to write online reviews. This paper also explores what happens when consumers become aware that brands are trying to persuade them to write a review.

Design/methodology/approach

Through three experimental studies, where participants were randomly assigned to a brand that has either a stronger or weaker brand equity, participants’ intention to write reviews was measured. Trust in the message was measured to study its mediating role, and persuasion knowledge of the participants was manipulated to investigate its moderating effect.

Findings

The findings confirm that consumers are more likely to write online reviews when a message comes from a brand that has stronger brand equity, trust in the message mediates the relationship between brand equity and consumer intention to write an online review, and persuasion knowledge has a differential effect on consumer intention to write reviews.

Originality/value

The study adds to the brand equity and online review literature by providing evidence that a higher level of consumer trust on brands that have stronger brand equity leads to an increased intention to write a review for the brand. It also shows that consumers’ awareness of the motive of the brand is more beneficial for brands with strong brand equity, contributing to persuasion knowledge literature.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 29 February 2020

Hsuan-Hsuan Ku and Mei-Ju Chen

As an alternative to straight rhetorical questions, questions using analogies that invite the reader to think about the frame of reference to answer the target have been…

Downloads
256

Abstract

Purpose

As an alternative to straight rhetorical questions, questions using analogies that invite the reader to think about the frame of reference to answer the target have been used in advertising to persuade. This paper aims to investigate consumer responses to the use of analogical questions in ads for incrementally new products and the important variables moderating those responses.

Design/methodology/approach

Four between-subjects experiments examined how product evaluations in response to analogical questions differ from non-analogical variants as a function of consumers’ persuasion awareness (Studies 1 and 2) and also tested if the effectiveness of an analogical question among potential consumers who are more aware of persuasion attempts might be enhanced only when it is proposed with a strong rather than a weak frame of reference (Study 3), and when the frame of reference and the target share underlying similarities (Study 4).

Findings

Analogical questions are more persuasive than non-analogical variants for participants who are more aware of persuasion attempts. Inferential fluency mediates the results. Furthermore, the positive impact of analogical questions for participants high in persuasion awareness is diminished when the frame of reference is weak or from a dissimilar domain. The same patterns are not evident for participants who are less aware of persuasion attempts.

Research limitations/implications

Drawing on the concepts of inferential fluency, this study offers an empirically-based view of how the analogical questions in advertising may bias the responses exhibited by individuals who demonstrate either a high or low level of persuasion awareness.

Practical implications

The inclusion of an analogy can lower consumers’ tendency to behave in a defensive manner by facilitating inferences about intended claims that are implicitly stated in a rhetorical question and achieve higher levels of persuasion.

Originality/value

This study contributes to prior study on rhetorical questions within a persuasion communication by adopting inferential fluency as an underlying mechanism for analyzing the impact of analogical questions and individual’s awareness of persuasion.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 54 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 22 September 2020

Nefike Gunden, Cristian Morosan and Agnes L. DeFranco

This study aims to develop and validate a conceptual model that explains consumers’ persuasion by the information available on online food delivery systems (OFDS). The…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to develop and validate a conceptual model that explains consumers’ persuasion by the information available on online food delivery systems (OFDS). The study validated consumers’ price savings orientation as an antecedent of two types of browsing behaviors (utilitarian and hedonic). Browsing and social influences were examined as predictors of persuasion.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review was conducted to determine constructs that constituted the best conceptual model for this study. To test the model, an online instrument was developed, and data were collected with the help of a global marketing panel company from 333 consumers who have used OFDS. Confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling were used to test the hypotheses of the model.

Findings

The study found that consumers’ price savings orientation strongly influenced both types of browsing. However, while utilitarian browsing did not influence consumers’ persuasion, hedonic browsing and social influence were strong predictors of persuasion.

Research limitations/implications

Given the uniqueness of the study that stems from its task-technology context and the type of product being purchased, this study advances the literature in hospitality information technology, especially in the relatively neglected foodservice information technology area. The study also provides implications for both restaurants and OFDS as critical stakeholders in this important area.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to examine consumers’ persuasion in a food-service online retail context. This study is also the first to examine both types of browsing as distinct constructs in hospitality and to explain their differential role in persuasion.

摘要

研究目的

本论文提出和验证了在线送餐系统(OFDS)解释顾客劝服的理论模型。本论文检测了顾客省钱心理作为两种浏览行为的动力(功利型和享乐型)。浏览行为和社会影响作为顾客劝服的因子在本文中进行了检验。.

研究设计/方法/途径

本论文通过审阅文献以找到最佳模型。通过在线采样的方式, 与全球营销公司合作, 搜集数据, 样本数量为333位使用过OFDS的顾客。分析方法为验证性因子分析和结构方程模式以验证假设模型。.

研究结果

研究发现顾客省钱心理对两种浏览模式有着重大影响。然而, 功利型浏览行为并不影响顾客劝服, 但是享乐型浏览和社会影响成为劝服的强烈动力。.

研究理论限制/意义

由于本论文的独特性在于其任务-科技背景和购买产品类别, 本论文对酒店信息科技的文献有着延展性贡献, 特别是在较少关注的餐饮服务信息技术领域。本论文还对饭店和OFDS, 两大在此领域重要利益相关者提供了启示。.

研究原创性/价值

本论文是首篇检测在线餐饮销售领域中的顾客劝服问题。此外, 本论文也是首篇检测两种类别浏览行为, 以及检验其行为对顾客劝服的特别作用。.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Technology, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-9880

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 11000