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Book part
Publication date: 30 September 2020

Shivinder Nijjer, Kumar Saurabh and Sahil Raj

The healthcare sector in India is witnessing phenomenal growth, such that by the year 2022, it will be a market worth trillions of INR. Increase in income levels…

Abstract

The healthcare sector in India is witnessing phenomenal growth, such that by the year 2022, it will be a market worth trillions of INR. Increase in income levels, awareness regarding personal health, the occurrence of lifestyle diseases, better insurance policies, low-cost healthcare services, and the emergence of newer technologies like telemedicine are driving this sector to new heights. Abundant quantities of healthcare data are being accumulated each day, which is difficult to analyze using traditional statistical and analytical tools, calling for the application of Big Data Analytics in the healthcare sector. Through provision of evidence-based decision-making and actions across healthcare networks, Big Data Analytics equips the sector with the ability to analyze a wide variety of data. Big Data Analytics includes both predictive and descriptive analytics. At present, about half of the healthcare organizations have adopted an analytical approach to decision-making, while a quarter of these firms are experienced in its application. This implies the lack of understanding prevalent in healthcare sector toward the value and the managerial, economic, and strategic impact of Big Data Analytics. In this context, this chapter on “Predictive Analytics in Healthcare” discusses sources, areas of application, possible future areas, advantages and limitations of the application of predictive Big Data Analytics in healthcare.

Details

Big Data Analytics and Intelligence: A Perspective for Health Care
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-099-8

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Book part
Publication date: 1 February 2021

Natalia Kucirkova

Abstract

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The Future of the Self: Understanding Personalization in Childhood and Beyond
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-945-0

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Article
Publication date: 31 December 2019

Ravi Sharma, Charcy Zhang, Stephen C. Wingreen, Nir Kshetri and Arnob Zahid

The purpose of this paper is to describe the application of soft systems methodology (SSM) to address the problematic situation of low opt-in rates for Precision Health-Care (PHC).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the application of soft systems methodology (SSM) to address the problematic situation of low opt-in rates for Precision Health-Care (PHC).

Design/methodology/approach

The design logic is that when trust is enhanced and compliance is better assured, participants such as patients and their doctors would be more likely to share their medical data and diagnosis for the purpose of precision modeling.

Findings

The authors present the findings of an empirical study that confronts the design challenge of increasing participant opt-in to a PHC repository of Electronic Medical Records and genetic sequencing. Guided by SSM, the authors formulate design rules for the establishment of a trust-less platform for PHC which incorporates key principles of transparency, traceability and immutability.

Research limitations/implications

The SSM approach has been criticized for its lack of “rigour” and “replicability”. This is a fallacy in understanding its purpose – theory exploration rather than theory confirmation. Moreover, it is unlikely that quantitative modeling yields any clearer an understanding of complex, socio-technical systems.

Practical implications

The application of Blockchain, a platform for distributed ledgers, and associated technologies present a feasible approach for resolving the problematic situation of low opt-in rates.

Social implications

A consequence of low participation is the weak recall and precision of descriptive, predictive and prescriptive analytic models. Factors such as cyber-crime, data violation and the potential for misuse of genetic and medical records have led to a lack of trust from key stakeholders – accessors, participants, miners and regulators – to varying degrees.

Originality/value

The application of Blockchain as a trust-enabling platform in the domain of an emerging eco-system such as precision health is novel and pioneering.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 120 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 23 November 2019

Tiziana Russo Spena and Mele Cristina

Over recent years, few industries have seen such dramatic changes as the healthcare industry. The potential connectivity of digital technologies is completely transforming…

Abstract

Purpose

Over recent years, few industries have seen such dramatic changes as the healthcare industry. The potential connectivity of digital technologies is completely transforming the healthcare ecosystem. This has resulted in companies increasingly investing in digital transformations to exploit data across channels, operations and patient outreach, by building on a practice approach and actor-network theory and being informed by service-dominant logic, this study aims to contribute by advancing the agential role of third-party actors to prompt innovation and shape service ecosystems.

Design/methodology/approach

This research is grounded in an epistemological contextualism. To gain situated knowledge and address the role of context in knowledge, understanding and meaning the authors adopted a qualitative methodology to study actors in their different contexts. The empirical research was based on case theory. The authors also took guidance from practice scholars about how to investigate actors’ practices. The unit of analysis moves from dyadic relationships to focus on practices across different networks of actors.

Findings

This study expands on the conceptualization of triad as proposed by Siltaloppi and Vargo (2017) by moving from the form of triadic relationships – brokerage, mediation and coalition – to the agency of e-health third-parties; and their practices to innovate in the healthcare ecosystem. This study focuses on the actors and the performativity of actions and grounding the conceptual view on an empirical base.

Practical implications

Third-party actors bring about innovative ways of doing business in the healthcare ecosystem. Their actions challenge the status quo and run counter to long-time practices. Third-parties support the complex set of interconnections between different healthcare actors for the provision of new service co-creation opportunities. Considering how these e-health third-parties performs has implications for health managers, patients and other actors.

Originality/value

This study focuses on the actors and the performativity of actions and grounding the conceptual view on an empirical base. The agency of third-party actors is their ability to act among others and to connect multiple social and material structures to boost innovation. They prompt innovation and shape service ecosystems by brokering, mediating and coalescing among a great variety of resources, practices and institutions.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 24 August 2010

Steve Gillard, Kati Turner, Kathleen Lovell, Kingsley Norton, Tom Clarke, Rachael Addicott, Gerry McGivern and Ewan Ferlie

The purpose of this paper is to describe a recent experiment in research coproduction in an evaluation of service planning at a London Mental Health NHS Trust. The paper…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe a recent experiment in research coproduction in an evaluation of service planning at a London Mental Health NHS Trust. The paper aims to consider whether members of the research team who have themselves been users of mental health services are able to contribute to the research process as “experts by experience”, or if their experiential knowledge is “colonized” within the academic research team.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative, comparative case study approach was adopted, using structured observations and semi‐structured interviews. Researchers' reflective accounts and a reflective focus group were employed to explore the process of coproduction.

Findings

The paper concludes that, far from “colonising” expertise by experience, the experiment builds local capacity in research coproduction and usefully informs a service planning process that reflects the priorities and concerns of a range of stakeholders.

Research limitations/implications

The paper describes a small, local experiment in research coproduction and so findings are limited in their scope. However, the study demonstrates an effective methodological approach to evaluating, empirically, the impact of coproduction on the health services research (HSR) process.

Practical implications

The paper demonstrates the potential for repeated exercises in coproduction to build capacity in collaborative approaches to both HSR and service planning.

Originality/value

The involvement of experts by experience is increasingly a policy requirement in the domains of both health service planning and HSR in the UK. There are very few empirical studies that evaluate the impact of that coproduction.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2013

Atanu Chaudhuri and Paul Lillrank

Purpose of this paper is to identify capabilities required for healthcare service providers to provide mass personalized services and to provide directions to conduct…

Abstract

Purpose

Purpose of this paper is to identify capabilities required for healthcare service providers to provide mass personalized services and to provide directions to conduct empirical studies to understand the phenomenon of mass personalization in Indian healthcare industry.

Methodology/approach

The research is conducted by undertaking a literature review followed by field visits and interviews conducted at a leading healthcare service provider in India.

Findings

There is limited empirical research on understanding the mass personalization capabilities in healthcare setting and empirical validation of the sand cone model and theory of competitive progression in the context of healthcare. Our interviews and field visits to Narayana Hrudayalaya (NH) indicate that it is attempting to provide personalized services to a large number and variety of patients. By doing so, it is expected to improve on both resource and flow efficiencies at the same time and hence break the trade‐offs between those. Literature review coupled with field visits and interviews help us in identifying key research questions related to mass personalization of healthcare in Indian healthcare industry.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first attempts to understand this trade‐off between resource and flow efficiency in the context of the Indian healthcare industry and to identify areas for future research. The unique characteristics of the Indian healthcare industry provide the ideal research setting to study this phenomenon. Literature review and our exploratory study have helped us in providing directions for future research in this unexplored area.

Details

Journal of Advances in Management Research, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0972-7981

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Article
Publication date: 9 April 2020

Philippa Hunter-Jones, Nathaniel Line, Jie J. Zhang, Edward C. Malthouse, Lars Witell and Brooke Hollis

This paper considers the question: what would happen if healthcare providers, like their counterparts in the hospitality industry, adopted the principles of customer…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper considers the question: what would happen if healthcare providers, like their counterparts in the hospitality industry, adopted the principles of customer experience management (CEM) in order to facilitate a more holistic and personalized patient experience? It proposes an alternative vision of the patient experience by adding to an emerging hospitality–healthcare literature base, this time focusing upon CEM. A hospitality-oriented patient experience (HOPE) framework is introduced, designed to enhance the patient experience across all the touchpoints of the healthcare journey.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a conceptual paper that draws upon three distinct literatures: hospitality literature; healthcare literature; and CEM literature. It utilizes this literature to develop a framework, the HOPE framework, designed to offer an alternative lens to understanding the patient experience. The paper utilizes descriptions of three unique patient experiences, one linked to chronic pain, a second to gastro issues and a third to orthopedic issues, to illustrate how adopting the principles of hospitality management, within a healthcare context, could promote an enhanced patient experience.

Findings

The main theoretical contribution is the development of the HOPE framework that brings together research on CEM with research on cocreative customer practices in health care. By selecting and connecting key ingredients of two separate research streams, this vision and paradigm provide an alternative lens into ways of addressing the key challenges in the implementation of person-centered care in healthcare services. The HOPE framework offers an actionable roadmap for healthcare organizations to realize greater understanding and to operationalize new ways of improving the patient experience.

Originality/value

This paper applies the principles of hospitality and CEM to the domain of health care. In so doing it adds value to a hospitality literature primarily focused upon extensive employee–customer relationships. To a healthcare literature seeking to more fully understand a person-centered care model typically delivered by a care team consisting of professionals and family/friends. And to a CEM literature in hospitality, which seeks to facilitate favorable employee–customer interactions. Connecting these separate literature streams enables an original conceptual framework, a HOPE framework, to be introduced.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

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Article
Publication date: 18 July 2008

Tom C.M. Joosten, Inge M.B. Bongers and Ir Bert R. Meijboom

The article discusses how care programmes and integrated care pathways can be linked, finding ways to improve healthcare process professional and logistical quality from a…

Abstract

Purpose

The article discusses how care programmes and integrated care pathways can be linked, finding ways to improve healthcare process professional and logistical quality from a supply chain and a network point‐of‐view.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors argue that owing to cost containment goals and increasing healthcare demand, healthcare services systems are challenged to improve service quality, whilst at the same time finding ways to improve delivery processes. It explores if the combination of two instruments, care programmes and integrated care pathways, can meet both goals. This combination is illustrated by an example from the Institute of Mental Health Care Eindhoven en de Kempen.

Findings

Analysis suggests that care programmes can be combined with integrated care pathways, leading to a situation where both quality and process improvement can be reached. These instruments are complementary.

Research limitations/implications

The article is largely conceptual; ideas are presented to stimulate thinking rather than to prove an argument.

Practical implications

Combining care programmes and integrated care pathways has implications for the way we think about and organise healthcare processes.

Originality/value

There have been few publications on instruments combining both a network and a supply chain approach to describe and understand healthcare processes.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Book part
Publication date: 1 February 2021

Natalia Kucirkova

Abstract

Details

The Future of the Self: Understanding Personalization in Childhood and Beyond
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-945-0

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Article
Publication date: 3 September 2018

Kurnianingsih Kurnianingsih, Lukito Edi Nugroho, Widyawan Widyawan, Lutfan Lazuardi, Anton Satria Prabuwono and Teddy Mantoro

The decline of the motoric and cognitive functions of the elderly and the high risk of changes in their vital signs lead to some disabilities that inconvenience them. This…

Abstract

Purpose

The decline of the motoric and cognitive functions of the elderly and the high risk of changes in their vital signs lead to some disabilities that inconvenience them. This paper aims to assist the elderly in their daily lives through personalized and seamless technologies.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors developed a personalized adaptive system for elderly care in a smart home using a fuzzy inference system (FIS), which consists of a predictive positioning system, reflexive alert system and adaptive conditioning system. Reflexive sensing is obtained from a body sensor and environmental sensor networks. Three methods comprising the FIS generation algorithm – fuzzy subtractive clustering (FSC), grid partitioning and fuzzy c-means clustering (FCM) – were compared to obtain the best prediction accuracy.

Findings

The results of the experiment showed that FSC produced the best F1-score (96 per cent positioning accuracy, 94 per cent reflexive alert accuracy, 96 per cent air conditioning accuracy and 95 per cent lighting conditioning accuracy), whereas others failed to predict some classes and had lower validation accuracy results. Therefore, it is concluded that FSC is the best FIS generation method for our proposed system.

Social implications

Personalized and seamless technologies for elderly implies life-share awareness, stakeholder awareness and community awareness.

Originality/value

This paper presents a model of personalized adaptive system based on their preferences and medical reference, which consists of a predictive positioning system, reflexive alert system and adaptive conditioning system.

Details

International Journal of Pervasive Computing and Communications, vol. 14 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-7371

Keywords

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