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Article
Publication date: 22 November 2022

Aarti and Ravin Kadian

Students’ performance in academic settings, to a great extent, is an outcome of personal determinants of individuals. So, it becomes necessary to understand the role of…

Abstract

Purpose

Students’ performance in academic settings, to a great extent, is an outcome of personal determinants of individuals. So, it becomes necessary to understand the role of personality traits in gaining desired academic outcomes. This investigation attempts to study some selected personality traits’ contribution to students’ self-efficacy and disaffection and the further impact of these two variables on academic performance.

Design/methodology/approach

To attain the target of the study, a sample of 455 university students from state-owned universities of Haryana, India, has been drawn based on the snowball sampling technique. The researcher used Google Forms to collect primary data. The structure equation modeling technique has been applied to analyze the relation between studied variables.

Findings

Findings of the study showed a significant positive association of personality traits named agreeableness, conscientiousness and extraversion with self-efficacy that further contributes to academic performance. Also, students’ agreeableness and conscientiousness were negatively associated with students’ disaffection, discouraging an individual’s academic performance. Extraversion did not show any significant association with students’ disaffection.

Originality/value

Studies are available exploring variables like personality traits, student disaffection and self-efficacy. This study attempts to study all these variables together to understand their impact on academic performance.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 December 2022

Muhammad Akhtar and Muhammad Umair Malik

The study aims to examine the relationship between personality traits and investor risk behavior of the individuals trading in stock markets. Furthermore, this study…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to examine the relationship between personality traits and investor risk behavior of the individuals trading in stock markets. Furthermore, this study establishes the association of financial literacy on the relationship between personality traits and investor risk behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors analyze cross-sectional survey method data by using moderated multiple regression analysis, a standard method of determining the moderation effect. PROCESS Model method has been used in this study to check the robustness of the results.

Findings

The findings reveal that personality traits significantly influence investor risk behavior and financial literacy modifies the fundamental relationships between personality traits and investor risk behavior. The findings also conclude that behavioral impact was predetermined by individuals' genetic traits and is influenced by financial literacy.

Research limitations/implications

The current study provides valuable insights for investors and adamant grounds for future research. The two-fold role of individuals' personalities in case of gains and losses can be of interest to the researchers in future.

Practical implications

Investors currently facing the complex financial choices which are far beyond the day-to-day financial advice. This study guides rational investment behavior for portfolio managers and investors for advanced investment options.

Social implications

Most of the prior literature is based on developed markets, whereas the current study focuses on less literate society (i.e. Pakistan) to protect the investors from scams and fraud. The current study supports the vital role of investors in the socio-economic development of emerging markets.

Originality/value

The authors believe this study expands the boundaries of personality theories, especially in the context of risk behavior and financial literacy. The study also contributes to advancing the personality theory trimmed with financial literacy and investor behavior while making important theoretical inroads for future research.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 November 2022

Majid Ghasemy

This longitudinal study aims at assessing the impact of openness to experience and neuroticism on affective states experienced by the academics from the Malaysian public…

Abstract

Purpose

This longitudinal study aims at assessing the impact of openness to experience and neuroticism on affective states experienced by the academics from the Malaysian public universities during the first strict COVID-19 lockdown in 2020.

Design/methodology/approach

The author collected data for openness to experience and neuroticism at the beginning of the lockdown, and for positive and negative affect, when the lockdown ended. The author used the efficient partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLSe2-SEM) methodology to fit the model to the screened data (N = 291).

Findings

The results showed that openness to experience had a negative effect on negative affect and a positive effect on positive affect. The author also observed that neuroticism had a positive effect on negative affect and a negative effect on positive affect. These findings provided support for the proposition of the impact of personality traits on affective states amidst the COVID-19 pandemic in academic settings.

Practical implications

The study shows that careful assessment of lecturers' personality traits should be considered during the process of selection and recruitment since these factors, theoretically and empirically, trigger affective states which, in turn, lead to behaviors and attitudes.

Originality/value

This is the first study on examining the impact of academics' personality traits on their affective states. Also, it is amongst the few longitudinal studies on evaluating personality traits during the COVID-19 pandemic. As a methodological novelty, the author used the PLSe2 methodology to test the model and compared the results with maximum likelihood (ML) results.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Rick Howard

This paper reviews the medico‐legal background to the development of the pilot programme for treatment and assessment of dangerous individuals with severe personality

Abstract

This paper reviews the medico‐legal background to the development of the pilot programme for treatment and assessment of dangerous individuals with severe personality disorder. It raises the question: is personality disorder related to dangerousness, and (if so) what mediates the relationship? It then reviews recent findings suggesting that patients deemed to be dangerous and severely personality disordered are characterised by a combination of antisocial and borderline traits, and as such are a source of distress both to themselves and to others. It remains for future research to determine how this particular constellation of personality disorders is functionally linked to dangerousness, and whether the link is mediated by neuropsychological impairment resulting from early‐onset alcohol abuse, as recently proposed by Howard (2006). It is recommended that the current criteria for ‘dangerous and severe personality disorder’ be dispensed with.

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2008

Jenny Torr

This article reviews the literature on personality disorder in offenders with learning disabilities, using Medline, PsychoInfo and CINAHL databases, and search terms…

386

Abstract

This article reviews the literature on personality disorder in offenders with learning disabilities, using Medline, PsychoInfo and CINAHL databases, and search terms ‘offending’, ‘personality disorder and intellectual disabilities’, ‘learning disabilities’ and related terms. Methods of defining offending population, personality disorder and learning disabilities vary greatly, and few studies focus specifically on personality disorder, learning disability and offending. The definition of learning disability often encompasses both borderline learning disability and low average intelligence. Personality disorder, especially anti‐social personality disorder, is prevalent in offenders with learning disabilities, but less than in the general population, and is associated with higher levels of security and poorer outcomes. The study concludes that there is a continuum of offenders with borderline and mild learning disabilities, reflected in learning disability forensic services.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-0180

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 September 2009

Sarah Davidson and Carol Ireland

This study examined an individual's drug use in relation to their coping styles, personality traits and attachment style. A total of 98 participants (46 females and 52…

Abstract

This study examined an individual's drug use in relation to their coping styles, personality traits and attachment style. A total of 98 participants (46 females and 52 males) took part in the study. Analysis did not show a significant difference in insecure/ambivalent attachment in the drug‐using group. Yet, there was evidence to suggest that the drug‐using group exhibited higher levels of personality disorder traits, based only on self‐report. Individuals with more personality disorder traits had a more insecure attachment style. Participants who use drugs had a more avoidant coping style. The results are discussed with reference to previous research and the implications of the current research on attachment theory and personality disorder etiology, as well as implications for drug treatment.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 September 2022

George Balabanis and Aleksandra Karpova

This paper aims to examine whether brands derive their personalities from their culture of origin, the stereotypes about their cultures of their origin or the cultures of…

238

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine whether brands derive their personalities from their culture of origin, the stereotypes about their cultures of their origin or the cultures of their buyers. It also examines which of a culture’s personality traits are more transmittable to brand personalities (BPs), as well as the consequences of the BP resemblance to the personalities of the brand’s culture of origin and consumers’ culture on BP’s clarity and consumer attachment to the brand.

Design/methodology/approach

Hypotheses were developed and tested on survey data from a sample figure of 1,116 US consumers of luxury brands on 23 luxury brands originating from France, the USA, Britain, Italy and Germany. Trait by trait and personality profile analyses were performed using hierarchical model analysis (linear mixed effects models) and Cattell’s (1969) pattern similarity coefficient.

Findings

The culture of a brand’s origin accounts for differences of different brands personalities. The personality profiles of a country’s brands are distinct from the BP profiles of brands from other countries. The conscientiousness trait of a culture is the most transmittable to BPs. BPs derive their characteristics from stereotypes of a culture’s personality than the actual personality of the culture. The assimilation of a brand’s personality to consumer’s culture is not supported. The similarity of a BP to both real and stereotypical personality of the culture of the brand’s origin enhance perceived clarity of the BP.

Research limitations/implications

The study’s focus is limited to established luxury brands coming from countries that are the traditional producers of luxuries. Empirical evidence also comes only from American consumers of luxury brands. New luxury brands from countries that have recently emerged as luxury producers need to be included.

Practical implications

Brands retain a significant space to differentiate their personalities beyond the influence of their culture of origin on BPs. With the exception of conscientiousness, personality traits of culture are not automatically inherited or transmitted to the brands. Cultural stereotypes find their way into BPs easier than real personality traits and managers should focus on them. BP matching with the personality of a culture is a good way for managers to increase the perceived clarity of their brands’ personality.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first to examine the culture’s influence on BP using a compatible to the BP construct cultural framework, McCrae and Terracciano’s (2005a) personality of a culture framework. Three cultural meaning transfer processes are examined (cultural inheritance, cultural stereotyping and acculturation to the consumer’s culture) within the same study from a trait-by-trait and a configurational (i.e. personality profile) perspective. The consequences of BP similarity to the brand’s culture of origin as well as consumer’s culture on the BP’s appeal are also assessed.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 56 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 December 2010

Adebowale

Personality disorders manifest themselves in a variety of ways and there is also debate about the extent to which these conditions can be treated. The author debates the…

Abstract

Personality disorders manifest themselves in a variety of ways and there is also debate about the extent to which these conditions can be treated. The author debates the definition of personality disorder and considers the stigma that this diagnosis can attach to individuals. A new approach to the treatment of people with personality disorders is proposed, using the person‐centred approach and placing the individual at the centre of services. With regards to personality disorder, this person‐centred approach is able to treat the condition as well as addressing the negative effects of how it manifests itself.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 March 2016

Saikat Banerjee

The relationship between brand personality and consumer personality has become a researched issue in recent years. It is viewed that marketers start the dialogue with…

9681

Abstract

Purpose

The relationship between brand personality and consumer personality has become a researched issue in recent years. It is viewed that marketers start the dialogue with consumers through personality route by building brand personality in line with consumers’ own personality traits. Moreover, in the midst of stiff competition, role of corporate personality, as a component of corporate identity, has been considered instrumental behind the success of the organization. As a result, there might be a possibility that other than his/her own personality traits, a consumer’s brand preference may be influenced by both brand personality and corporate personality of the said brand marketer. So, the predictive roles of individual personality, brand personality and corporate personality on consumer brand preference formation need to be empirically investigated so that the same may be addressed strategically. However, as per knowledge of the researcher, no empirical study has been made to investigate the predictive role of consumer personality, brand personality and corporate personality on brand preference. In this back drop, to the best of our knowledge, this study is the first attempt to fill this research gap by investigating firstly, the direct effects of individual personality of consumer, brand personality and corporate personality on consumer brand preference and secondly the impact of interaction effects of those variables on brand preference in the context of the emerging economies.

Design/methodology/approach

This study includes Indian four-wheeler passenger car market as the focal point of the study. As the product category is predominantly linked with symbolic benefits to the consumers, this target segment may be motivated to express their personality through the brands they prefer. As a result it may be an appropriate sector to study the influence of individual, brand and corporate personality behind brand preference. In this study, we have used an anonymous self-administered structured questionnaire. Part A captured respondent’s brand preference. Part B used The Big Five Model personality scale. Part C used the ‘Brand Personality Scale’ proposed by Aaker (1997) as a measure of brand personality. Part D comprised ‘Corporate Personality Scale’ developed by Davies et al. (2001). Part E recorded demographic data, including age, income, educational qualification and occupation. For Part B, C and D, Respondents were asked to rate each of the dimensions, using a five-point Likert scale, ranging from 5=Most descriptive to 1=Least Descriptive. The validity of the theoretical model is tested through Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA). In the first stage, main effects of the proposed model are tested. In the next stage, we have tested interaction effects of constructs on band preference. To test the hypotheses multiple regression method has been used.

Findings

The result of main effects shows that individual and brand personality has significant impact on brand preference for the considered brand by the consumers. This implies that at the time of brand preference, consumers give due importance to individual personality and personality of the considered brand of SUV. A strong and clear brand personality indicates a favorable view about the brand. Further, the result shows at the time of buying decision, personalities of both product and corporate brand are influencing their preferences. Here, consumers might be making strong association between corporate and brand personalities. In addition, interaction effects among individual, brand and corporate personality are also significant. One may view from the result that consumers do not encourage compartmentalize thinking at the time of brand choice. In place of considering his/her own personality and brand and corporate personality as a standalone entity, they think in totality and interaction effects have significant influence on their brand preference.

Research limitations/implications

The paper has mentioned limitations: the restriction on selecting industry, company and brand, the restraint of sampling coverage and lack of generalization of the study findings. The implications should be interpreted with care. In this study we have not compared different brands from same industry or brands from different industries; there is a scope to do so. Moreover, this study considers results from one national context and, consequently, cross-national study may be conducted to extend the validity of the findings.

Practical implications

The findings from this study may enlighten brand marketers about the degree of influence of brand personality, corporate personality, and consumer personality on brand preference. This study advocates interaction effects of individual, brand and corporate on consumer brand preference. From this study perspective, we may say, brand personality and corporate personality provide significant opportunity for creation of uniqueness and have the potential to significantly influence brand preference.

Originality/value

This paper makes two contributions to the brand management literature. First, it provides new empirical evidence of the positive main effect of individual and brand personality on brand preference. Second, this paper first investigates interaction effects of individual personality, brand personality and corporate personality on brand preference. This is a very unique contribution of the paper. The results provide new insights for academic and practitioners into the relationship among individual personality, brand personality and corporate personality. This study is the first attempt to fill this research gap by investigating the impact of consumer personality, brand personality and corporate personality on brand preference.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Alice L. Bennett

The purpose of this paper is to explore the range of personality disorder diagnoses and levels of psychopathy as assessed by the Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the range of personality disorder diagnoses and levels of psychopathy as assessed by the Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R) associated with treatment discontinuation in a sample of adult male prisoners.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from 92 male offenders in a high secure prison personality disorder treatment unit was analysed. PCL-R and personality disorder diagnoses were predicted as being related to increased treatment dropout.

Findings

Having a diagnosis of narcissistic personality disorder was related to treatment dropout, but PCL-R total scores were not. There was a trend for a diagnosis of antisocial personality disorder being associated with remaining in treatment.

Research limitations/implications

The current study highlights that narcissistic personality disorder can be associated with treatment dropout, warranting further exploration as to why this is the case.

Practical implications

Managing responsivity issues for those presenting with a personality disorder diagnosis could be effective in maximising treatment engagement from this specific offender group.

Originality/value

Although treatment dropout has been explored previously, this is the first study to explore treatment dropout at a specialised unit designed specifically to provide treatment for this client group.

Details

Journal of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3841

Keywords

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