Search results

1 – 10 of over 1000
Article
Publication date: 20 March 2009

Ross D. Petty

This paper aims to assert that rather than challenging brand parodies, brand owners should consider allowing them in order to expand brand equity to convey a brand…

1890

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to assert that rather than challenging brand parodies, brand owners should consider allowing them in order to expand brand equity to convey a brand personality that includes a sense of humor.

Design/methodology/approach

The article analyzes recent brand product parody lawsuits.

Findings

Recent court decisions are more likely to allow product parodies than earlier court decisions.

Practical implications

Rather than expensive litigation that may lead to unfavorable public opinion, brand owners should consider licensing parody products to exercise some control over product quality and parody themes.

Originality/value

The article proposes tactical change for brand owners to further build brand equity.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 September 2020

Lindsay R.L. Larson and Jordan Salvador

While universities and colleges engage in marketing their brands through official communications, there also exists the unique case of social media accounts created by and…

Abstract

Purpose

While universities and colleges engage in marketing their brands through official communications, there also exists the unique case of social media accounts created by and for university students, which have the sole purpose of disseminating humorous parody content about the university. These accounts and their content are neither managed nor sanctioned by the university. While user-generated satire has been studied in the areas of politics and popular culture, it has not often been considered within the realm of universities and their student stakeholders.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 200 undergraduates at a large public university in the southeastern United States were surveyed regarding their engagement with and thoughts about parody accounts associated with their school.

Findings

All students surveyed were aware of these parody accounts associated with their university; however, results suggest that enjoyment of and engagement with these accounts varies. Those students engaged with university parody accounts experience heightened identification with, but reduced concern over this satirical (and often unprofessional) community, which could be harmful to their university's image.

Practical implications

Although educational institutions aim to convey an outward-facing message of academic excellence and professionalism, their student population may create, engage with and disseminate alternative messaging that must be considered.

Originality/value

While this unique form of online brand engagement is potentially harmful to the university image due to its humorous nature, it also can be seen as a form of brand community, lending to feelings of group identification for students. Brand parody within social media remains a largely ignored topic within higher education marketing.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

Stuart Hannabuss

Parodies live off the things they imitate. They also exist as literary works in their own right. They raise important legal and ethical issues for people in literary…

1955

Abstract

Parodies live off the things they imitate. They also exist as literary works in their own right. They raise important legal and ethical issues for people in literary, publishing, and information work. There may be infringement, use in a misleading context, the exercise of fair use, plagiarism, and free speech. At best there may be theft of the text, at worst theft of authorship itself. The postmodern interest in pastiche removes the oppositionality of parody but paradoxically reveals how perennial a form it is and its consequences are.

Details

Library Review, vol. 51 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 January 2011

Sylvie Jean

The use of aggressive media campaigns to parody a competitor is a relatively recent development. The aim of this study is to gauge the consequences of parody on attitudes…

8183

Abstract

Purpose

The use of aggressive media campaigns to parody a competitor is a relatively recent development. The aim of this study is to gauge the consequences of parody on attitudes towards the brand that is the victim of the parody.

Design/methodology/approach

The data collection was carried out in an experiment design in two steps (before and after brand parody exposure) in order to measure the effects of a parody exposition on brand‐parodied attitude.

Findings

The results show that average level of attitude toward the brand parodied is significantly different after exposure to the advertisement that parodies it. Thus, the average level of attitude toward the brand parodied is significantly different in accordance with the degree to which those exposed to parodies are subject to feelings of anti‐commercial rebellion.

Practical implications

This study shows that a brand parody communication by playing negative humour with an anti‐commercial style represents a real threat for the brand parodied.

Originality/value

This research measured the effect of parody on attitude toward the brand parodied by its competitor. For this, the original materials were used (iPod advertising and iPod parody advertising made by its competitor).

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 June 2010

Jae‐Young Moon and Jun‐Sik Kwak

The purpose of this paper is to verify the difference in the effect of art‐parody and art‐infusion advertisements depending on the product type and regulatory focus, and…

767

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to verify the difference in the effect of art‐parody and art‐infusion advertisements depending on the product type and regulatory focus, and to expand the boundary of research in the field.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper examines their effect depending on product type and regulatory focus through two experiments. One is the effect of art‐parody and art‐infusion advertisements by product type and the other is the effect of art‐parody and art‐infusion advertisements by regulatory focus.

Findings

Art‐infusion is more effective than art‐parody for utilitarian products in terms of message credibility and brand attitude except for purchase intention although there is no difference between the two types for hedonic products. Participants with promotion focus favor art‐parody advertisement, while participants with prevention focus favor art‐infusion advertisement in terms of cognitive attitude toward advertisement.

Research limitations/implications

This study is conducted as a part of research on art infusion, which is in the primitive stage of development. Therefore, it shall be possible to extend the boundary of research by applying a variety of marketing theories in the future.

Originality/value

The results of this paper imply that the advertising technique must vary depending on the type of focus the target customer values.

Details

Asian Journal on Quality, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1598-2688

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 13 March 2019

Joseph Brennan

This chapter considers the influence of horror on the production of commercial gay pornography. I see this influence reflected especially in the production and popularity…

Abstract

This chapter considers the influence of horror on the production of commercial gay pornography. I see this influence reflected especially in the production and popularity of gay pornographic films inspired by horror franchises from the slasher and ‘torture porn’ cycles that have been remade in recent decades. Nine texts are selected for analysis – from the slasher genre: Bryan Kenny’s 2010 A Nightmare on Twink Street (inspired by the A Nightmare on Elm Street series), Andy Kay’s 2012 Black XXXmas (inspired by Black Christmas), Frank Fuder and Angel Skye’s 2009 Halloweiner: Friday the Fuckteenth and Chi Chi LaRue’s 2016 Scared Stiff (both inspired by the Friday the 13th series), Bromo’s 2017 Cream for Me (Scream series); and from the torture porn genre: Jett Blakk’s 2006 Bonesaw, John Bruno’s 2006 Rammer and Bryan Kenny’s 2010 Raw I and 2011 (with Andy Kay) Raw II (inspired by the Saw franchise). The specificity of the horror genre is addressed, as is the importance of gender. But particular focus is directed toward the structural aspects of gay porn parodies and the degree to which horror parodies in particular have the potential to blend pornographic homosex with graphic violence, perhaps most extreme in the slasher and torture porn horror variants. Other potentialities are also explored, such as for the easing of narrative/sex porn tensions.

Article
Publication date: 23 March 2020

Sweta Thota and Ricardo Villarreal

What happens when an ad parody is created with subtle, professional changes to text and imagery, making it almost indistinguishable from the original corporate brand ad…

Abstract

Purpose

What happens when an ad parody is created with subtle, professional changes to text and imagery, making it almost indistinguishable from the original corporate brand ad? This paper labels this limiting condition of ad parodies as hijacked advertising. Can viewers of such ads recognize whether the ad is hijacked or not? Also, what are the effects of using the dimensions of disparaging humor and offensiveness, commonly used in hijacked ads, on attitudes toward the brands in these ads and a propensity to engage in negative word-of-mouth (WOM) behavior? Results show that ad hijacking recognition moderates the effect of disparaging humor and offensiveness dimensions in hijacked ads on the dependent variables, with adverse attitudes toward the brand and increased intentions to engage in negative WOM behavior only when consumers can recognize that a hijacked ad is indeed hijacked. Further, the moderating effect of ad hijacking recognition on the dependent variables is attributable only to the dimension of offensiveness but not to disparaging humor. Finally, results show that attitudes toward the brand in the hijacked ads completely mediate the effect of offensiveness and the recognition that an ad is hijacked on intentions to engage in negative WOM behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper investigates these questions through an empirical examination using an original corporate brand ad, a hijacked version of the original ad using a disparaging humor dimension and another hijacked version of the original ad using the offensiveness dimension.

Findings

Results show that ad hijacking recognition moderates the effect of disparaging humor and offensiveness dimensions in hijacked ads on the dependent variables, with adverse attitudes toward the brand and increased intentions to engage in negative WOM behavior only when consumers can recognize that a hijacked ad is indeed hijacked. Further, the moderating effect of ad hijacking recognition on the dependent variables was attributable only to the dimension of offensiveness but not to disparaging humor. Finally, results show that attitudes toward the brand in the hijacked ads completely mediates the effect of the recognition that an ad is hijacked and the dimension of offensiveness on intentions to engage in negative WOM behavior. The result, that a fairly high percentage of respondents attribute the original corporate brand as the source of the hijacked ads, points to a potentially damaging and out-of-control threat to marketers.

Originality/value

Through an empirical study, converging results around the effects of hijacking ads with disparaging humor and offensive dimensions on consumers’ attitudes toward the advertised brand and a propensity to engage in negative WOM behavior were gathered.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 37 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 2 May 2012

Carl Rhodes and Peter Bloom

Bureaucratic hierarchy, as the hallmark of the modern organization, has been remarkably resilient in the face of increasingly pervasive attacks on its fundamental value…

Abstract

Bureaucratic hierarchy, as the hallmark of the modern organization, has been remarkably resilient in the face of increasingly pervasive attacks on its fundamental value and usefulness. We investigate the reasons for this from a cultural, particularly psychoanalytic, perspective – one that sees hierarchy's perpetuation not in terms of the efficacy of its instrumental potential, but rather in the values that are culturally sedimented within it. We argue that hierarchy reflects longings for a pure heavenly order that can never be attained yet remains appealing as a cultural fantasy psychologically gripping individuals in its beatific vision. To tease out this cultural logic we examine two representations of it in popular culture – the U.S. television comedy The Office (2005–) and comedian Will Farrell's impersonation of George W. Bush (2009). These examples illustrate the strength of bureaucratic hierarchy as an affective cultural ideal that retains its appeal even whilst being continually the subject of derision. We suggest that this cultural ideal is structured through a ‘fantasmatic narrative’ revolving around the desire for a spiritualized sense of sovereignty; a desire that is always undermined yet reinforced by its failures to manifest itself concretely in practice. Our central contribution is in relating hierarchy to sovereignty, suggesting that hierarchy persists because of an unquenched and unquenchable desire for spiritual perfection not only amongst leaders, but also amongst those they lead.

Details

Reinventing Hierarchy and Bureaucracy – from the Bureau to Network Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-783-3

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 18 December 2020

Karl Farrugia

Comedy and parody in rock and metal music have been around since the genre's inception. The Italian comedic music genre known as rock demenziale employs the use of…

Abstract

Comedy and parody in rock and metal music have been around since the genre's inception. The Italian comedic music genre known as rock demenziale employs the use of nonsense and surrealism which turns conventions upside down. The demenziale has also attracted a slew of bands that employ this humour within the heavy metal genre, most famous of which is the Roman band Nanowar of Steel. With their jabs at Manowar and power metal bands, they place mundane activities and characters into the grandiose medievalist and fantasy worlds commonly used by those bands to the point of absurdity. However, with humour being deeply culture-specific, jokes that draw from a country's pop culture and makes extensive use of puns may be lost to an audience not familiar with that culture. Nanowar of Steel's unique position of having songs written in seven languages, primarily English and Italian, allows us to take a deeper look at how language and humour interfaces with the local and global metal scenes.

Details

Multilingual Metal Music: Sociocultural, Linguistic and Literary Perspectives on Heavy Metal Lyrics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-948-9

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Tamara Eisenschitz

To explore moral rights laws in Europe and their effects on publication contents.

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Abstract

Purpose

To explore moral rights laws in Europe and their effects on publication contents.

Design/methodology/approach

Conceptual analysis of legislation, cases and information resources which illustrate effects of law.

Findings

There are three main types of moral right. They effect: authorship and reputation concerning correction of errors and history of ideas; elucidation of ideas through parody: is a reputation being unduly attacked?; the creative extension of cultural content by its readership/audience: when is this legitimate?

Practical implications

These features link the property concept of knowledge with a human‐rights construct of content defined via personality.

Originality/value

Choices of regulation affect the balance between property and personality approaches which determine access to knowledge and culture. The IS community needs awareness of its choices.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 58 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Keywords

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