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Book part
Publication date: 22 August 2006

Richard C. Hunter

Parent involvement is a major component of several school reform initiatives, including the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 commonly referred to as Title I…

Abstract

Parent involvement is a major component of several school reform initiatives, including the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 commonly referred to as Title I. Parent involvement is also an important provision in the latest reauthorization of the Leave No Child Behind Act (NCLB) of 2001, PL 107-110. Important research on parent involvement is presented in this chapter. Also, a brief discussion of the role parent involvement has played in several important school reform initiatives, such as decentralization, community control, and compensatory education are discussed. Finally, specific recommendations are given for school leaders, superintendents, and principals, on how to use parent involvement to help schools and students make Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP), a requirement of NCLB.

Details

No Child Left Behind and other Federal Programs for Urban School Districts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-299-3

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Article
Publication date: 5 November 2020

Lana Lučić, Tihana Brkljačić and Andreja Brajša-Žganec

Social distancing and school closures have changed the lives of many parents around the globe. In addition to these problems, parents of children with developmental…

Abstract

Purpose

Social distancing and school closures have changed the lives of many parents around the globe. In addition to these problems, parents of children with developmental difficulties (DD) have faced additional stressors that make them even more susceptible to higher stress levels and the onset or worsening of anxiety or depression. Consequentially, these stressors may have an indirect effect on parental functioning and children with DD owing to the spillover effect.

Design/methodology/approach

The purpose of this paper is to draw attention to parents of children with DD through an overview of possible additional stressors that have appeared during the coronavirus pandemic in Croatia. In writing this viewpoint paper, three sources were consulted: official state documents, communication with professionals (e.g. speech therapists) and online support groups for parents of children with DD.

Findings

Restrictive measures during the lockdown led to a lack of both formal and informal support for parents of children with DD. Moreover, the possibility of infection led to higher levels of fear among these parents; children with DD also encountered problems coping with both the restrictive measures and the demands of distance learning.

Practical implications

This paper may present a good starting point for both governments and NGOs when discussing and planning further advancement in the quality of response to the COVID-19 pandemic and a “recovery” response after the crisis. This overview may provide better insight into COVID-19–related consequences among parents of children with DD, which is vital to increasing the effectiveness of future measures and actions.

Originality/value

Although some negative effects of the pandemic on children have already been discussed by several authors, little attention has been paid to parents, and even less so to parents of children with DD. This paper may even represent a pioneering work in exploring the consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic on this population group.

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Journal of Children's Services, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

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Article
Publication date: 23 September 2021

Kristin Stewart, Glen Brodowsky and Donald Sciglimpaglia

This paper aims to identify the factors that motivate parents to adopt internet monitoring software (aka parental control software [PCS]) to curb problematic internet…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify the factors that motivate parents to adopt internet monitoring software (aka parental control software [PCS]) to curb problematic internet usage and safeguard their children online. By doing so, the authors are able to curb problematic internet usage and keep children safe online.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was conducted using a representative sample of 330 parents in the USA with children ages 10 to 15. Results were analyzed using structural equation modeling.

Findings

This research combines two theories, namely, technology acceptance model (TAM) and protection motivation theory (PMT) to factors that motivate parents to adopt internet monitoring software to help their children. Perceived severity, perceived vulnerability from PMT and personal innovativeness (PI) from TAM, which is related to self-efficacy and the belief that future technologies will require less effort to adopt, are key factors that influence parents’ perceived usefulness of PCS. Perceived usefulness and PI both positively predict parents’ purchase intention for internet monitoring software.

Practical implications

The study establishes that there are personal, technology and situational factors that motivate the adoption of PCS. These determinants have implications for how marketers identify potential users and how they might improve the promotion of internet monitoring technologies.

Originality/value

The paper extends the application of the technology acceptance model and PMT to predict technology adoption aimed at helping others. Findings show that personal and perceptual factors motivate parents’ adoption of internet monitoring software to curb problematic internet usage and keep children safe online. This paper is the first to combine the technology acceptance model and PMT to explain the adoption of software solutions to protect others online. By doing so, a more thorough account of parents’ technology adoption to protect their children is offered.

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Young Consumers, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

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Article
Publication date: 16 September 2021

Yu Chih Chiang, Che-Jen Su, Hsin-Hsing Liao, Monica Chaudhary and Yi-Fang Lan

This paper aims to explore adolescents’ perceptions of child-parent dominance in family vacation decision-making (FVDM) by investigating child-parent relative influence…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore adolescents’ perceptions of child-parent dominance in family vacation decision-making (FVDM) by investigating child-parent relative influence (CPRI) and responsibility-sharing (RS) within the family in regard to 15 vacation issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper adopts Davis and Rigaux’s (1974) framework for identifying adolescents’ perceptions of child-parent dominance across a set of subjects concerning FVDM, by inspecting the distribution of family decision roles across 25 nations. This study then segments the issues regarding family vacations and nations, judging by CPRI and RS within the family. In addition, this paper introduces Hofstede’s cultural dimensions and diverse indices of development for each surveyed nation and compares their respective correlations with CPRI and RS at the national level.

Findings

The results, derived from data collected in 25 countries or territories, illustrate a climate of a parent-dominant-to-autonomous style of FVDM for all decision issues and all nations. Overall, both information availability and economizing attribute of issues are related to the democratization of FVDM. The relationship between the child-parent role distribution and national clusters varied across issue clusters. In addition, the paper found the national effectiveness more effective than the cultural dimension in explaining the dispersal of CPRI-RS profiles.

Originality/value

The data collected from 25 nations provide strong evidence for profiling child-parent dominance in FVDM. The data also serve as a basis for analyzing the role of sociocultural and ideological influences on child-parent dominance in FVDM, which was not established in previous research.

子女在家庭渡假决策中的主导地位:多国分析研究

中文摘要

目的

我们针对15个度假决策项目,调查青少年子女与父母的相对影响力(CPRI)和责任分担(RS),以探讨青少年在家庭渡假决策(FVDM)中相对于父母的支配地位的看法。

设计/方法/流程

我们应用戴维斯(Davis)和里加(Rigaux)发表于1974 年的理论架构,调查25国中家庭决策角色的分配情况,从而确定青少年在家庭渡假决策相关决策项目中,子女-父母主导地位之看法。此外,我们根据”相对影响力”和”责任分担”来分别区隔决策项目与国家。我们也应用霍夫斯泰德的文化维度和多元社会发展指数,比较它们与”相对影响力”和”责任分担”的相关性。

结果

从25个国家或地区收集的数据得出的结果表明,对于所有决策问题和所有国家来说,家庭渡假决策属于父母主导或自治风格的氛围。总体而言,资讯的可用性和问题的节约属性都与家庭渡假决策的民主化有关。子女-父母角色分布与国家集群之间的关系因决策项目集群而异。此外,我们发现,在解释”相对影响力-责任分担”侧像的分散方面,国家效能比文化维度更具影响力。

创意/价值

我们从25个国家/地区收集的数据为分析家庭渡假决策中子女-父母的主导地位提供了有力的证据。并分析社会文化和意识形态影响对家庭渡假决策中子女-父母主导地位的基础,在现有的文献中尚未被建立。

Propósito del articulo

Nosotros exploramos las percepciones adolescentes sobre la predominancia de padre e hijo en la toma de decisiones vacaciones en familiares (FVDM) mediante la investigación de la influencia relativa entre padres e hijos (CPRI) y la responsabilidad compartida (RS) dentro de la familia en relación con 15 temas de vacaciones.

Diseño/ metodología/enfoque

Adaptamos el sistema de David and Rigaux para identificar las percepciones de adolescentes sobre el dominio padre e Hijo en un conjunto de temas relacionados con la FVDM, mediante la inspección de la distribución de los roles de decisión familiar a través de 25 países. Luego, segmentamos los problemas relacionados con las vacaciones familiares y naciones, juzgando por CPRI y RS con la familia. Además, presentamos las dimensiones culturales de Hofstede y los diversos índices de desarrollo para cada sociedad encuestada y comparamos sus respectivas correlaciones con CPRI y RS a nivel nacional.

Resultados

Los resultados obtenidos de los casos recopilados en 25 países o territorios, ilustran un clima de estilo de FVDM de los padres en predominio autónomo para todos los temas de decisión y naciones. En general, tanto en los temas de disponibilidad de información como el atributo economizador están relacionadas con la democratización de la FVDM. La relación entre la distribución de roles de padres e hijos y los grupos nacionales vario entre los grupos temáticos. Además, encontramos que la eficacia nacional es más eficaz que la dimensión cultural para explicar la dispersión de los perfiles CPRI-RS.

Originalidad/valor

Nuestros datos recopilados de 25 países proporcionan pruebas sólidas para perfilar el dominio de padres e hijos en la FVDM. Los datos también sirven como base para analizar el papel de la influencias socioculturales e ideológicas en el predominio de padres e hijos en la FVDM, que no se estableció en investigaciones anteriores.

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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2021

Brenda Brand, Mary Alice Barksdale, Tamara Wallace and Yolanda Latrice Avent

Literature indicates African American parents can feel real or perceived discrimination that strains their interactions with teachers, resulting in them feeling alienated…

Abstract

Purpose

Literature indicates African American parents can feel real or perceived discrimination that strains their interactions with teachers, resulting in them feeling alienated from their children’s school.

Design/methodology/approach

This is an exploratory case study of two African American parents, who although guarded in their relationships with teachers, exposed their vulnerabilities to Project ESTEEM faculty as they requested support in resolving behavioral and academic challenges with their children. It is an exploratory case study in that the field notes were taken prior to defining the research question, positioning it as research that sets the stage for a future more comprehensive study. The researchers, as participant observers recorded field notes of events and interactions that occurred. The research question was, “What were the factors that influenced the relationships between the Project ESTEEM faculty and African American Parents? The subquestions were “What were the distinctions of alienation that challenged the parents’ relationships in the schools? and "How were the factors that challenged the parents’ relationships with teachers mitigated in Project ESTEEM faculty’s relationships with the parents?” A constant comparative method was used beginning with open coding, followed by identifying patterns, themes and subthemes reflecting the specific needs of the parents in relationship to the overall theme.

Findings

The stories highlight sociocultural contexts influencing the alienation of some African American parents in their children’s education through an analysis of the relationships fostered with Project ESTEEM faculty.

Research limitations/implications

This case study reports the experiences of two parents from one community and school, participating in a specialized program.

Originality/value

The significance resides in the representation of alternate viewpoints in understanding the alienation experiences of African American parents from schools.

Details

Journal for Multicultural Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-535X

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Article
Publication date: 30 August 2021

Behice Humeyra Kara and Jaimee Stuart

Understanding the effects trauma has on refugee parents and consequently, their children, is the first step in interrupting the intergenerational transmission of trauma…

Abstract

Purpose

Understanding the effects trauma has on refugee parents and consequently, their children, is the first step in interrupting the intergenerational transmission of trauma. This study aims to investigate the impacts of parental exposure to trauma pre-settlement on parent and child reports of developmental difficulties as mediated by parental post-traumatic stress symptomology and harsh parenting.

Design/methodology/approach

The study included 414 refugee children (age M = 14.04, SD = 2.00; 48.3% female) and their caregivers (age M = 41.78, SD = 5.24, 77% female). The sample was drawn from the Building a New Life in Australia study, a large, representative cohort study of resettled refugees in Australia. Only data collected where both parents and their children could be matched were used in this study.

Findings

Results indicated that trauma was significantly associated with increased parental post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in all models and was negatively, albeit weakly, associated with lower levels of harsh parenting in the overall model which combined parent and child reports. Trauma also had a weak, positive indirect effect on developmental difficulties via parental PTSD in both the overall model and the model assessing parent-rated developmental difficulties. In all models, harsh parenting was associated with increased developmental difficulties, although harsh parenting did not act as a significant mediator of the effects of trauma or parental PTSD.

Originality/value

Results suggest that prior traumas had less of an adverse effect on parenting and child adjustment as was expected. Parenting, however, was strongly associated with poor child adjustment, indicating that this may be a key factor to encourage positive adjustment for refugee children.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2021

Emel Avçin and Şeyda Can

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between the stress experienced by parents during the pandemic and their cyberchondria. The research was carried…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between the stress experienced by parents during the pandemic and their cyberchondria. The research was carried out in a descriptive and cross-sectional manner.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample of the research: living in Turkey and has created 432 parents with at least one child between the ages of 6 and 15. Participant information form, parental stress scale and cyberchondria scale were used in the study. Data were collected through online surveys between July 1, 2020, and August 31, 2020.

Findings

In the study, when the scores obtained from the Parental Stress Scale and the Cyberchondria Scale were compared with the demographic characteristics, a significant difference was found between gender, age, marital status, education level, economic status, number of children and presence of chronic diseases (p < 0.05). It was determined that there is a significant difference between the responses of the parents regarding the pandemic process and the Parental Stress Scale and the Cyberchondria Scale (p < 0.05). A positive significant correlation was found between the Parental Stress Scale and the total and subdimensions of the Cyberchondria Scale (p < 0.05).

Research limitations/implications

The research was carried out with only parents with children between the ages of 6 and 15, but it reveals the stress and cyberchondria of the parents during the pandemic.

Originality/value

The results obtained reflect the factors affecting the stress and cyberchondria levels experienced by parents during the pandemic process. Also, as the stress of the parent's increases, it has seen that the level of cyberchondria increases in parallel.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1996

Virginia Blakey and Jane Frankland

Finds research shows that while parents are potentially an important source of information and support to their children on sexual issues, in practice many parents feel…

Abstract

Finds research shows that while parents are potentially an important source of information and support to their children on sexual issues, in practice many parents feel that they lack the skills and confidence to play a direct role in these matters. Presents findings from a pilot project undertaken by Health Promotion Wales and FPA Cymru to enhance parents’ sex education skills. Details a series of workshops which were run for groups of parents with differing needs in relation to their children’s sex education. Describes how participants took part in pre‐workshop interviews to identify their concerns and in post‐workshop interviews to assess the impact of the workshops. Presents findings from the workshop evaluations, together with some lessons learned from the project. Advises that the long‐term outcome of the project, a resource pack on sex education for parents, is now available.

Details

Health Education, vol. 96 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 8 July 2021

Huifeng Bai, Weijing He, Jin Shi, Julie McColl and Christopher Moore

This empirical research, adopting an international retailing perspective, aims to examine the parenting advantages offered by emerging market multinationals (EMNCs) in…

Abstract

Purpose

This empirical research, adopting an international retailing perspective, aims to examine the parenting advantages offered by emerging market multinationals (EMNCs) in luxury fashion retail sector.

Design/methodology/approach

The researchers adopted a qualitative case study, and the qualitative data were collected through ten semi-structured interviews with senior managers.

Findings

It is a win–win situation for the EMNCs as parent groups of Western luxury fashion brands, as the EMNCs can access critical assets including advanced brand management expertise, retailing know-how, and the services skills needed for higher income consumers. Meanwhile, the subsidiary brands benefit from a high degree of autonomy, intra-group resource utilisation, a competitive brand portfolio and most importantly economies of scales in the value chain, particularly in production. The perceived risks of EMNCs ownership include potentially restricted autonomy and the uncertainty over corporate development activities in the future, as well as the risks of diluting brand image caused by the inconsistency between country of origin and country of ownership.

Research limitations/implications

Very few EMNCs have moved into luxury fashion retailing to date, which means that the sampling frame was small. The findings were generated from China, which is perceived to be of considerable psychic distance in terms of culture and policies compared to other emerging markets that have been heavily influenced by colonialism.

Practical implications

This paper suggests that practitioners, particularly EMNCs, support their subsidiary luxury fashion brands through parenting advantages and develop their own high-end fashion brands through internationalisation.

Originality/value

This empirical study contributes to the current international retailing literature by offering in depth insights of parenting advantages offered by EMNCs in luxury fashion retailing. It also enriches the EMNC literature, which has mainly adopted an international business scope, by extending this understanding into luxury fashion retailing.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 9 April 2019

Timothy Galpin

The gap between management theory and practice has been much criticized. To help bridge the divide, a synthesis of empirical, theoretical and practice literature is…

Abstract

Purpose

The gap between management theory and practice has been much criticized. To help bridge the divide, a synthesis of empirical, theoretical and practice literature is offered, along with an application of the widely used VRIO framework, to contend that developing a focused corporate parenting approach as a core competence serves as a source of competitive advantage for diversified companies.

Design/methodology/approach

A synthesis of empirical, theoretical and practice literature is presented, beginning with a discussion of why and how firms diversify; the relative performance of firms that pursue related and unrelated diversification; an application of the resource-based view, core competencies and the VRIO framework; a description of focused corporate parenting as a core competency; a prescription for how diversified firms can implement a focused corporate parenting approach; and implications for research.

Findings

Developing a focused corporate parenting approach as a core competence serves as a source of competitive advantage for diversified companies.

Research limitations/implications

The synthesis of empirical, theoretical and practice literature presented provides a foundation for future research into the impact of focused corporate parenting on diversified firm performance.

Practical implications

The paper includes a prescription for how diversified firms can implement a focused corporate parenting approach.

Originality/value

The application of the resource-based view and core competency theories to corporate parenting provides managers with the rationale for and methodology to focus their corporate parenting activities.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 40 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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