Search results

1 – 10 of 120
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2015

Hülya Turgut and Emel Cantürk

Although the design studio has formally been the locus for design education, informal education approach has gained more and more acceptance in the world. Informal…

Abstract

Although the design studio has formally been the locus for design education, informal education approach has gained more and more acceptance in the world. Informal education, which is the education outside the confines of curricula, includes the acquisition of knowledge and skills through experience, reading, social contact, etc. Workshops cover the essential weight of this informal education. Although the role of the design workshops in architectural design education has been very limited through overall design education’s past, many schools of architecture have taken steps to consider workshops as the part of informal learning and education.

“Culture and Space in the Build environment” (CSBE) Network of IAPS have been organizing “culture and design workshop series” for graduate and post graduate students in Turkey since 2001. In these workshops, a design teaching approach based on the conceptual framework of culture and space interactions is applied. The conceptual framework developed for the architectural design education, takes three fundamental starting points for workshops as the part of informal design education: as a tool for informal design education (method), as a tool for learning & understanding culture-environment relations (content), and as a tool for awareness of different environments/contexts (scale/place). The foundation of the conceptual framework is based on the general approach that discusses the “architectural design process” with regards to environmental context and content.

Within this context the aim of the paper is to discuss and evaluate the importance and the contribution of workshops as tool for informal architectural design education. These discussions will be held on the case of IAPS-CBSE Network’s last workshop “Istanbul as a Palimpsest City and Imperfection”. In the paper, the process, the method, the content and the results of workshop studies will be discussed and evaluated.

Details

Open House International, vol. 40 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 5 November 2016

Fernando Manuel Rocha da Cruz

The organization of events in public spaces in the cities of Oporto, Vila Nova de Gaia (both in Portugal), and Barcelona (Spain) led us to propose a classification of…

Abstract

The organization of events in public spaces in the cities of Oporto, Vila Nova de Gaia (both in Portugal), and Barcelona (Spain) led us to propose a classification of thematic cities. The conclusions are the result of social representations of organizers and sponsors in the three cities and, thus, it is a qualitative study carried out in research Ph.D. in Sociology at the Faculty of Letters of the University of Oporto. We propose the presentation of some events organized in three public spaces – Aliados Avenue in Oporto, Cais de Gaia’s waterfront in Vila Nova de Gaia, and Ramblas in Barcelona – to make its framing in terms of objectives, motivations, and public. We also appealed to the social representations of interviewees to evaluate the quality and structure of public spaces in the two cities in the metropolitan area of Oporto in comparison with the Catalan city. Finally, we propose the typification of the three cities according to the features presented throughout the chapter.

Details

Public Spaces: Times of Crisis and Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-463-1

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2011

Bob Brown

A new urban paradigm, the global city, emerged in the late 20th Century finding acceptance in discussions of urban development. Tied into a global network of exchange, it…

Abstract

A new urban paradigm, the global city, emerged in the late 20th Century finding acceptance in discussions of urban development. Tied into a global network of exchange, it exists principally as a place of financial speculation and transaction. It is marked by a parallel economy of culture, which underpins a re-conceptualisation and spatial re-formation of the city. Despite its widespread currency, criticisms have challenged its economic sustainability. Further questions have contested its tendency to impose a singular, homogenized space prioritizing consumption while marginalising other concerns.

Post-independence Riga's recent experience provides a platform from which to critique the global city paradigm, which the city embraced as it sought to embed itself in the West not only politically but culturally and economically as well. In opposition to this model's intrinsic singular emphasis and exclusionary tendencies, this text will explore the concept of palimpsest; this proposition understands the city as a multiplicity of layers, within which convergences and divergences offer a site from which to generate synergies. This will be framed in reference to recent discourse on the sustainable city and development practice. Recent design-led inquiry situated in the context of Riga will then provide a lens on palimpsest as an alternative form of praxis.

Details

Open House International, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

Keywords

Abstract

Details

The Lived Experience of Work and City Rhythms: A Rhythmanalysis of London's Square Mile
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-759-4

Article
Publication date: 10 May 2022

Evangelia Tsilika and Ioannis Vardopoulos

This study aims to examine the rehabilitation project of the iconic urban industrial building in Athens, “FIX” brewery, and the practices followed, so as to initiate a…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the rehabilitation project of the iconic urban industrial building in Athens, “FIX” brewery, and the practices followed, so as to initiate a discussion on the role of the façades in such a process. In particular, this study suggests that by choosing to restore just two of the façades out of the whole building, while placing emphasis on creating a new face for the new use, frontality is promoted against the pre-existing homogeneity approach, and façadism is introduced. However, both façadism and frontality distance this project from the rationale behind the adaptive reuse and redevelopment of built heritage.

Design/methodology/approach

A thorough architectural analysis of the FIX brewery building's long history and its consecutive transformations, besides providing adequate evidence for the hypothesis set, provided the opportunity to broaden the scope of this research and explore the role of the façades in adaptive reuse practice. Methodology-wise, this research was further strengthened by a comparative analysis of the Weverij De Ploeg adaptive reuse project in Bergeijk.

Findings

In the light of this critical analysis, the current study first highlights the importance of a building's façades in shaping public perception and establishing a connection to the city, by transmitting information and meanings about the building's structure, function, character and era. Accordingly, it stretches the need for façades' retention when adapting an industrial building of cultural heritage to a new use. Second, it emphasizes the need of fostering a holistic perspective toward a historic industrial building of such merit, respecting the building as a whole and in all its depth.

Originality/value

This in-depth analysis provides a solid ground for rethinking adaptive reuse, concretizing the appropriate approaches to industrial buildings of cultural heritage from parties involved (inter alia government leaders, legislators, property developers, historians, urban planners, architects and other engineers), to ensure both the building's continuity and longevity, and an efficient and sustainable urban regeneration.

Details

Archnet-IJAR: International Journal of Architectural Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2631-6862

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2011

Yurdanur Dulgeroglu-Yuksel

This editorial deals with the issue of sustainability in relation to the development of the city in the 21st century. The main goal is to make an inquiry into Piecemeal vs…

Abstract

This editorial deals with the issue of sustainability in relation to the development of the city in the 21st century. The main goal is to make an inquiry into Piecemeal vs Grand Planning Approaches to generating sustainable cities. The focus of the city is the human settlements. The issue of sustainability has been a concern for many planners, architects, urban geographers and social scientists. “Sustainability” is an old concept but has become a new solution criteria for generating liveable cities. The role of the professional is crucial in the development of cities to become more sustainable. It seems that development of cities, especially those in developing countries, in the post-modern age require a critical evaluation and updating of their existing housing and settlement policies and practices. They seem to neglect the development dynamics in fast-growing metropoles sometimes. While the natural phenomenon of urbanisation require piecemeal approach to spatial planning and development in Developing countries, their governments tend to adopt Grand policies of developed countries. Implementation of such policies with fujrthern use of high-tech often results in large wipe-outs in the city and social disintegration, following the replacement of existing neighborhoods. Physical and social integrity, as well as slow growth of settlements is a crucial start towards sustainable cities.

Details

Open House International, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

Book part
Publication date: 1 March 2021

Lorenzo Campagna

The ancient monuments of Taormina represent one of the richest archaeological heritage of Sicily. Some of them, such as the Hellenistic-Roman Theatre, the odeum, the…

Abstract

The ancient monuments of Taormina represent one of the richest archaeological heritage of Sicily. Some of them, such as the Hellenistic-Roman Theatre, the odeum, the so-called Naumachia, are annually frequented by thousands of tourists, while others remain practically unknown to the general public. The urban fabric of the Hellenistic-Roman period of which these monuments were part was profoundly modified by the transformations that the town has known, having grown on itself almost without interruption until today. For these reasons, as in many other cases of cities with continuity of occupation, ancient monuments are perceived by the visitor as decontextualized relics, immersed in a very suggestive landscape, but very different from the original one. Usually the didactic apparatus available to visitors is not able to give knowledge of the original relations between monument and city. Decades of topographical and archaeological research have allowed us to identify the ancient urban layout of Taormina, and it is therefore possible today to take up the challenge of offering the public a deeper and more complete knowledge of its archaeological monuments in their ancient context. In fact, thanks to modern technologies, it is now possible to share the results of archaeological research with a wider public and to virtually recreate the ancient urban landscape. This contribution intends to present the solutions made available by these technologies to define a new strategy to enhance the city's archaeological heritage and to offer the public a truly immersive experience in its history.

Article
Publication date: 9 April 2020

Luis D. Rivero Moreno

In the past years, the importance of the cultural economy has led urbanism to a new perspective. Simultaneously, the main international institutions have pointed out the…

Abstract

Purpose

In the past years, the importance of the cultural economy has led urbanism to a new perspective. Simultaneously, the main international institutions have pointed out the need to shift the urban economy into a sustainable one, green and energy efficient. The confluence of both flows explains why the imaginaries of the urban future are related to the concept of creative cities. Hence, the new economic engine of the cities should be founded on art, creativity and culture, all of them understood as clean energies. This study aims to show the crucial role of cultural heritage as a propeller of a new kind of urban development, more flexible and democratic, based on the construction of the city as a communicational, collective and open effort. Therefore, the city is conceived as a cultural heritage platform where tangible and intangible, social and creative interactions happen. Within this context, urban narratives appear as a dynamic material drawn on the possibilities offered by the heritage received from the past as a resource to be used for re-thinking and re-shaping the future.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach of this paper is based on a profound analysis of historical cities, mainly in the European context, supported by the work carried out within the H2020 ROCK project. The cities within the project are: Athens, Bologna, Cluj-Napoca, Eindhoven, Lisbon, Liverpool, Lyon, Torino, Skopje and Vilnius. A wide variety of case studies coming mainly from these cities have been considered to understand better the theoretical point of view on the role of heritage, urban development and city branding. The information about cultural heritage projects used as case studies has been collected and selected coming from the direct work made on the field and the communication open with institutions and cultural stakeholders in every city. Even more, parallel seminars on cultural heritage and city branding organized within the project have allowed the authors to gather very valuable, updated and fresh information on these issues in every particular case.

Findings

The study proves that cultural heritage has been traditionally underrated as a mechanism for developing the future of the city and its communicative strategy. Cultural heritage appears as a practical tool for constructing more cohesive urban communities based on the use of public space and shared memories as storytelling platforms. The capacity of resiliency and sustainability revealed by cultural heritage through the time is, as well, a clear reference to construct a potential sustainable city, socially, culturally and environmentally.

Social implications

Cultural heritage projects are shown as a perfect way to build stronger communities. Through the engagement and participation of citizens, urban storytelling reinforces a more open, real and sustainable city able to face the challenges of contemporary life (gentrification, pollution, mobility, etc.). Like that, heritage appears as a feasible tool for including citizens coming from all ages and backgrounds in the construction of a collective narrative of the city, based on the past and looking at the foreseen.

Originality/value

This study tries to relate fields that traditionally have remained not well connected: urban development, city branding and cultural heritage. The study demonstrates that cultural heritage is crucial as an urban narrative tool and consequently, as a planning/branding mechanism. Moreover, cultural institutions and cultural projects are very relevant platforms for social interaction, inviting citizens to have a more active role in the construction of the city as a collective communicational effort based on a network of social and cultural relations. Storytelling turns up as a new key element for communicating the city from grassroots, in a sustainable, democratic and inclusive manner, far away from the traditional top-down official perspective. Crowdsourcing methods are very powerful for establishing a shared and cohesive city brand, now rooted in its cultural and social foundations and not the marketing campaign clichés. Finally, storytelling emerges as a creative resource that enhances the social, cultural and economic layout of the city, forcing urbanists to include a greener, fairer and more democratic perspective in the future of cities.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2008

Suzanne M. Hall

This paper explores the documentation of social and spatial transformation in the Walworth area, South London. Spatial narratives are the entry point for my exploration…

Abstract

This paper explores the documentation of social and spatial transformation in the Walworth area, South London. Spatial narratives are the entry point for my exploration, where official and ‘unofficial’ representations of history are aligned to capture the nature of urban change. Looking at the city from street level provides a worldly view of social encounter and spaces that are expressive of how citizens experience and shape the city. A more distanced view of the city accessed from official data reveals different constructs. In overlaying near and far views and data and experience, correlations and contestations emerge. As a method of research, the narrative is the potential palimpsest, incorporating fragments of the immediate and historic without representing a comprehensive whole. In this paper Walworth is documented as a local and Inner City context where remnants and insertions are juxtaposed, where white working class culture and diverse ethnicities experience difference and change. A primary aim is to consider the diverse experiences of groups and individuals over time, through their relationship with their street, neighbourhood and city. In relating the Walworth area to London I use three spatial narratives to articulate the contemporary and historic relationship of people to place: the other side examines the physical discrimination between north and south London, the other half looks at distinctions of class and race and other histories explores the histories displaced from official accounts.

Details

Open House International, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 August 2012

Jason Bengtson

The purpose of this paper is to define and stimulate interest in a potential new specialty within the information science field.

855

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to define and stimulate interest in a potential new specialty within the information science field.

Design/methodology/approach

Sources on digital forensics and digital archeology are discussed, and the topic is examined critically from a librarian perspective. The author examines the possibility of an information science specialty pursuing the reconstruction of “digital palimpsests”, where data that later becomes historically significant has been deleted or partially overwritten on digital media.

Findings

The author identifies at least one key incident (the NASA moon landing tapes) where this potential field has already started to be defined. Examination of the literature indicates that emphasis in data recovery to this point has centered on the needs of law enforcement and disaster recovery rather than on the considerations of manuscript preservation, recovery, and curation. The author emphasizes the need for librarians to bring together the skills of multiple fields, especially that of information technology, in order to shape the tools needed to take the lead in “digital palimpsest” recovery.

Originality/value

The author asserts that the recovery of “digital palimpsests” will become important as digital archives age and society's position on what has historical value inevitably shifts. The author further asserts that members of the information science field must actively work to take ownership of the field before it is subsumed by information technology or another discipline less equipped to manage its nebulous considerations effectively.

1 – 10 of 120