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Book part
Publication date: 1 May 2019

Gregg A. Stevens, Martin Morris, Tony Nguyen and Emily Vardell

Health science librarians occupy a unique place in librarianship, guiding healthcare professionals and the public to quality sources of medical research and consumer…

Abstract

Health science librarians occupy a unique place in librarianship, guiding healthcare professionals and the public to quality sources of medical research and consumer health information in order to improve patient outcomes and quality of life. A broader impact of health sciences librarianship is its advocacy for improvements in public health. In recent years, health science librarians have been actively involved in advocating for adequate, responsive, and culturally competent health care for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ+) individuals. Health sciences librarians have advocated for LGBTQ+ individuals through a variety of specialized outreach projects to address health disparities found in the LGBTQ+ community such as HIV/AIDS, women’s health, or substance abuse, have collaborated with public health agencies and community-based organizations to identify health disparities and needs, and have implemented outreach to address these needs.

This chapter maps the landscape of health sciences librarian outreach to LGBTQ+ people. The authors develop this theme through case studies of health science librarians providing health information to the LGBTQ+ community and healthcare professionals. Following an overview of advocacy for LGBTQ+ health by the US National Network of Libraries of Medicine and professional information organizations, they conclude the chapter by discussing the “pioneering” nature of these projects and the common threads uniting them, and by identifying the next steps for continued successful outreach through the development of an evidence base and tailoring of outreach and resources to address other demographic aspects of the members of the LGBTQ+ community.

Details

LGBTQ+ Librarianship in the 21st Century: Emerging Directions of Advocacy and Community Engagement in Diverse Information Environments
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-474-9

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Book part
Publication date: 16 July 2015

Laura Senier, Matthew Kearney and Jason Orne

This mixed-methods study reports on an outreach clinics program designed to deliver genetic services to medically underserved communities in Wisconsin.

Abstract

Purpose

This mixed-methods study reports on an outreach clinics program designed to deliver genetic services to medically underserved communities in Wisconsin.

Methodology/approach

We show the geographic distribution, funding patterns, and utilization trends for outreach clinics over a 20-year period. Interviews with program planners and outreach clinic staff show how external and internal constraints limited the program’s capacity. We compare clinic operations to the conceptual models guiding program design.

Findings

Our findings show that state health officials had to scale back financial support for outreach clinic activities while healthcare providers faced increasing pressure from administrators to reduce investments in charity care. These external and internal constraints led to a decline in the overall number of patients served. We also find that redistribution of clinics to the Milwaukee area increased utilization among Hispanics but not among African-Americans. Our interviews suggest that these patterns may be a function of shortcomings embedded in the planning models.

Research/Policy Implications

Planning models have three shortcomings. First, they do not identify the mitigation of health disparities as a specific goal. Second, they fail to acknowledge that partners face escalating profit-seeking mandates that may limit their capacity to provide charity services. Finally, they underemphasize the importance of seeking trusted partners, especially in working with communities that have been historically marginalized.

Originality/Value

There has been little discussion about equitably leveraging genetic advances that improve healthcare quality and efficacy. The role of State Health Agencies in mitigating disparities in access to genetic services has been largely ignored in the sociological literature.

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Article
Publication date: 4 June 2020

Atthaphon Mumi, George Joseph and Shakil Quayes

Microfinance institutions (MFIs) play an important role in economic development, with the dual objectives of social outreach and financial self-sufficiency. The purpose of…

Abstract

Purpose

Microfinance institutions (MFIs) play an important role in economic development, with the dual objectives of social outreach and financial self-sufficiency. The purpose of this study is to examine the influence of organizational structure and variations in legal systems on the MFI dual performance goals.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a sample that includes 1,518 MFIs from 105 different countries over a period of 20 years, this study analyzes the data by applying a model that includes six categories of organizational structures and variations of legal systems, including both civil and common law, with accounting performance measures for the dependent variables.

Findings

The analyses provide robust results indicating that MFIs structured as non-governmental organizations (NGOs) have better social outreach than all other types of MFIs and exhibit better financial performance than MFIs registered as commercial banks or credit unions. Legal systems also played a role in MFI effectiveness.

Research limitations/implications

Given the increasing importance of MFIs on economic development globally, this study has relevance on how the impact of MFI structural characteristics and macro-level influences on their dual performance criteria can be translated into management approaches and governance policies that can increase the effectiveness of these dual (i.e. social and financial) goals.

Originality/value

This study is more comprehensive than prior research in addressing the influence of organizational structures of MFIs and legal systems on MFI dual mission, namely, its financial performance and social outreach, thereby increasing our understanding of policy implications in sustaining the MFI’s developmental role.

Details

Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1832-5912

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Article
Publication date: 14 July 2020

Mohammad Zainuddin, Masnun Mahi, Shabiha Akter and Ida Md. Yasin

This study investigates the role of national culture between outreach and sustainability of microfinance institutions (MFIs). Despite microfinance's deep embeddedness in…

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigates the role of national culture between outreach and sustainability of microfinance institutions (MFIs). Despite microfinance's deep embeddedness in cultural contexts, research on the influence of national culture on MFI performance is rather sparse. This paper seeks to fill this gap and, based on cross-country microfinance data, attempts to explain the outreach-sustainability relationship in reference to cultural factors.

Design/methodology/approach

An unbalanced panel, consisting of 5,741 MFI-year observations of 1,232 MFIs from 43 countries in six regions, is drawn from the Microfinance Information Exchange (MIX) Market database. Two different econometric models are tested. Model 1 estimates the direct effect of outreach on sustainability, using a fixed-effects estimator. Model 2 examines the moderation effect of national culture on outreach-sustainability relationship, employing correlated random effects approach.

Findings

The results show that depth of outreach and financial sustainability of MFIs are negatively related, and the relationship is moderated by national culture. Power distance and uncertainty avoidance positively moderate the outreach-sustainability relationship, whereas individualism and masculinity negatively moderate the relationship.

Originality/value

The findings suggest that the national culture where MFIs are located plays an important contingent role in their performance and that the magnitude of the trade-off effect varies from culture to culture. The research thus provides further insight in the trade-off debate and contributes to literatures of both microfinance and cross-cultural management.

Details

Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5794

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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2011

Saibal Ghosh

Employing data on 14 major Indian states during 1973‐2004, this paper aims to investigate the hypothesis that economic growth is affected by financial outreach.

Abstract

Purpose

Employing data on 14 major Indian states during 1973‐2004, this paper aims to investigate the hypothesis that economic growth is affected by financial outreach.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper employs univariate tests as well as advanced panel regression techniques to examine whether financial outreach matters for state‐level economic growth.

Findings

The analysis suggests that improvements in financial outreach led to a perceptible rise in per capita growth. In terms of magnitudes, a rise in demographic outreach by 10 percent raises state per capita growth by 0.3 percent; in case of geographic outreach, the increase is lower. Finally, the analysis supports the hypotheses that states with higher manufacturing share tend to grow faster and the quality of state‐level institutions and infrastructure exert a significant bearing on growth.

Research limitations/implications

Although the definitions of financial outreach are based on international best practice, they focus only on banks and are driven by the availability of data on relevant variables.

Practical implications

The article belongs to the broad strand of literature which examines the finance‐growth nexus.

Social implications

Financial outreach is presently an avowed objective of policymakers, both in India and elsewhere. The article examines which sets of economic/policy variables impact financial outreach. The analysis can provide policymakers with feedback as regards the feasibility of the strategies pursued to improve financial outreach and thereby, how best to redesign and fine‐tune them.

Originality/value

To the author's knowledge, this is presumably the first study in India to examine the financial outreach‐growth nexus in a systematic manner at the sub‐national level.

Details

Journal of Indian Business Research, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4195

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Anne Berlin Blackman and Jack Luskin

The purpose of this paper is to explore the efficacy of a community‐based outreach initiative, piloted in Worcester, Massachusetts, to reduce children's exposure to toxic…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the efficacy of a community‐based outreach initiative, piloted in Worcester, Massachusetts, to reduce children's exposure to toxic chemicals in common household products by changing parental behavior regarding product purchase and use.

Design/methodology/approach

The program model was based on the premise that community health workers have the potential to deliver health education messages with particular effectiveness. Community health workers in Worcester received customized training to learn about the impact of toxic chemicals on children's health and strategies to reduce children's exposure to toxics in household products. The health workers then delivered this information to low‐income parents in English or Spanish. Through follow‐up interviews, the health workers used short surveys to collect data regarding the effect, if any, of the outreach on parental behavior regarding household product purchase and use.

Findings

Parents were receptive to receiving technical information about toxics and household products from outreach workers who could convey the message at an appropriate comprehension level. Parents' responses to the survey questions suggest that the outreach efforts increased their awareness and understanding of how toxics affect their children's health.

Research limitations/implications

Design and implementation aspects of the initiative – notably the size of the cohort recruited to the project – make it difficult to draw robust conclusions from the survey data. Nevertheless, the data do reflect at least a modest degree of parental behavior change regarding household product purchase and use.

Practical implications

Outreach efforts that reach parents individually in their homes are effective at communicating targeted information but do not necessarily result in parental behavior change. As consumers, many parents need to hear the message more than once before they will change their behavior regarding product use and purchase.

Originality/value

This paper describes a health education model that addresses an important but often overlooked area of risk to children's health: their exposure to toxics in common household products.

Details

Health Education, vol. 106 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

Lisa Martin and Will Martin

The purpose of this paper is to discuss how to use a web-based library game as an outreach tool at events. Games in higher education are a trend that libraries have used…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss how to use a web-based library game as an outreach tool at events. Games in higher education are a trend that libraries have used for information literacy but less frequently for outreach. Although there are relatively few examples of the use of games in academic library outreach events, games have the potential to be excellent outreach tools by engaging students and presenting them with the opportunity to change their perceptions of the library.

Design/methodology/approach

The University of North Dakota (UND) Libraries successfully connected with students at an outreach event by using a modified version of the Information Literacy Game originally developed by the University of North Carolina Greensboro (UNCG). UND Librarians created specific technical modifications and an event workflow, highlighted here, that other academic libraries can adapt for use at outreach events to attract both students who are and those who are not typically users of the library.

Findings

The information literacy game, with some specific technical changes, is customizable in relatively inexpensive ways that allow librarians from institutions of all sizes to engage students with a game at outreach events.

Originality/value

Games, especially Web-based games, have not previously been used in outreach events. The literature on the use of games in information literacy sessions but outreach is an even more logical fit for gaming. This paper presents a practical, value-oriented method for academic libraries to modify an information literacy game for use in outreach.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 43 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2012

Melissa Dennis

With outreach responsibilities on the rise in academic libraries and budgets declining or remaining stagnant, finding outreach initiatives that support the university in…

Abstract

Purpose

With outreach responsibilities on the rise in academic libraries and budgets declining or remaining stagnant, finding outreach initiatives that support the university in creative ways are on the rise. This study seeks to compare outreach initiatives by academic librarians to a project conducted by the author.

Design/methodology/approach

Academic librarians with responsibilities in outreach, marketing, and promotion were targeted in a survey sent to listervs in the Summer of 2011. A total of 21 academic librarians described successful outreach initiatives. A small response rate reflects the target audience.

Findings

The survey revealed a wide range of outreach initiatives that compare funding: library, university, grant, and other. The author's project greatly exceeded the cost of all other initiatives.

Research limitations/implications

The research identifies survey flaws and a small reach to the targeted audience. Suggestions for future research include a modified survey to the Association of Library Communications and Outreach Professionals.

Practical implications

Technology advancements and budget restraints have put pressure on outreach librarians to provide successful programs with less funding. Many colleges and universities across the nation have inserted outreach into public services positions.

Originality/value

The literature produces limited research about successful outreach initiatives over the past five years where economic duress has been nationwide. Outreach librarians will find inspiration in the collected outreach projects undertaken at 21 colleges and universities across America to create projects with limited funding.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 40 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 6 September 2011

Peter Willett and Rebecca Broadley

The purpose of this paper is to identify good practice in conducting outreach for homeless people, and hence to provide recommendations for future library outreach projects.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify good practice in conducting outreach for homeless people, and hence to provide recommendations for future library outreach projects.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors examine of four case studies taken from the library literature, and conduct six semi‐structured interviews with outreach and/or inclusion librarians from library authorities in South and West Yorkshire.

Findings

The recommendations include: developing partnerships with relevant organisations; removing proof‐of‐identity requirements for joining the library; disseminating the results obtained in projects; using book deposits and mobile library stops; training library staff to ensure that they are aware of relevant issues; building trust in the target audience; ensuring that outreach is tailored to the specific needs of different groups of homeless people; and using a range of methods to evaluate project effectiveness.

Originality/value

Identification of themes common to the published case studies and to the interviews provides a reasoned basis for the recommendations that are presented. These recommendations provide, for the first time in the UK, clear guidelines for future outreach projects for homeless people.

Details

Library Review, vol. 60 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2015

Stephen Korutaro Nkundabanyanga, Julius Opiso, Waswa Balunywa and Isaac Nabeeta Nkote

The purpose of this paper is to establish the relationship between managerial competence, managerial risk-taking behaviour and financial service outreach of microfinance…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to establish the relationship between managerial competence, managerial risk-taking behaviour and financial service outreach of microfinance institutions (MFIs).

Design/methodology/approach

In this cross-sectional and correlational study, the authors surveyed 52 branches of MFIs from a population of 60 branches of 20 MFIs in eastern Uganda. Two respondents, a branch manager and a senior loan officer, were the units of enquiry for each branch. The authors put forward and tested four hypotheses relating to the significance of the relationship between perceived managerial competence, risk-taking behaviour and financial service outreach using SPSS version 20. The authors established the hypothesized relationships using Pearson correlation coefficients and obtain a mediating effect of risk-taking behaviour using partial corrections and regression analysis.

Findings

The results suggest positive and significant relationships between perceived managerial competence, risk-taking behaviour and financial service outreach. However, while the direct relationship between managerial competence and financial service outreach without the mediation effect of risk-taking behaviour of managers was found to be significant, its magnitude reduces when mediation of risk-taking behaviour is allowed. Thus the entire effect does not only go through managerial competence but majorly also, through risk-taking behaviour of managers.

Research limitations/implications

This study did not control for environmental factors such as laws and regulations. As such the model may have been under fitted. Nevertheless, the study has introduced a clearer understanding that outreach performance in MFIs rests with competent managers in strategic positions operating in synergy with their risk-taking behaviour. The study informs policy makers that outreach performance of the MFIs depends on the quality of the competence managers have in addition to their risk-taking propensities.

Practical implications

Efforts by the stakeholders to improve financial service outreach must be matched with appropriate competences and risk-taking behaviour of managers.

Originality/value

The results contribute to extant literature by investigating two explanatory variables for financial service outreach and provide initial evidence of the mediating effect of intrinsic high risk-taking behaviour of managers. Results add to the conceptual improvement in risk-taking behaviour and lend considerable support for the behavioural perspective in the study of financial service outreach of MFIs.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 42 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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