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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1996

Cameron M. Ford and dt ogilvie

Organizational learning is depicted most frequently as an intra‐organizational information processing activity, but the role that experience plays in the development of…

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4469

Abstract

Organizational learning is depicted most frequently as an intra‐organizational information processing activity, but the role that experience plays in the development of organizational knowledge has recently become a more central focus of learning theories. The two primary perspectives on organizational learning present strikingly different depictions of the relationship between action and learning: systems‐structural models based on positivist epistemological assumptions emphasize internally‐directed information collection and distribution activities aimed at reducing uncertainty; interpretive models utilize an interpretivist epistemology that emphasizes the necessity of taking action in ambiguous circumstances as a means of creating knowledge. Proposes that neither of these alternative views of organizational learning describe how learning outcomes vary as a consequence of different types of action and that, specifically, previous models of organizational learning have not emphasized the critical role that creative actions play in the development of organizational knowledge. Delineates assumptions which serve to legitimize creative action taking within organizational contexts, and describes the learning outcomes which result from creative and routine actions. Extends previous models of organizational learning which emphasize cognition and communication processes by distinguishing the varied influences that different actions have on the production of knowledge.

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Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 17 February 2012

Kevin Ions and Ann Minton

The idea of the learning organisation as an aspiration for a continuous process of learning has become widely accepted by many organisations. The purpose of this paper is…

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1148

Abstract

Purpose

The idea of the learning organisation as an aspiration for a continuous process of learning has become widely accepted by many organisations. The purpose of this paper is to examine whether demand‐led higher education work‐based learning programmes can help nurture a supportive culture of learning and continuous improvement that helps companies to become learning organisations.

Design/methodology/approach

An analysis of students’ work‐based negotiated projects was undertaken to determine the extent to which their projects facilitated organisational learning. The analysis was carried out using an organisational learning checklist, developed through reference to the literature and research on organisational learning and learning organisations.

Findings

The study highlights the fact that although work‐based learning programmes can facilitate some aspects of organisational learning, the principles of organisational learning are not necessarily embedded in work‐based programme design.

Research limitations/implications

Although the results cannot be considered generalisable because they are based on a single case, further analysis of a greater range of work‐based learning programmes could establish external validity of the findings. Further research could include the development of an organisational learning taxonomy or action research to develop a work‐based programme that embeds organisational learning principles.

Practical implications

The principles of organisational learning should be considered when designing work‐based learning programmes.

Originality/value

The study highlights the importance of considering organisational learning when designing demand‐led, higher education work‐based learning programmes and outlines a method for analysing the extent to which existing programmes embed organisational learning principles.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1997

Thomas Robinson, Barry Clemson and Charles Keating

Establishes our perspective for shared organizational learning processes, cycles, and systems. These learning phenomena are usually tacit, i.e. the organization is only…

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2631

Abstract

Establishes our perspective for shared organizational learning processes, cycles, and systems. These learning phenomena are usually tacit, i.e. the organization is only dimly aware of them. These tacit phenomena drive both decision and action and, because they are tacit, they are self‐organizing and are normally not analysed. In order to develop effective learning systems, the organization must explicitly articulate and design these learning processes, cycles, and systems. The “learning unit” is introduced as the essential element where learning development must focus for improved organizational performance. Begins to develop the implications of this perspective for organization theory, organizational practice, and the art of management. Organizational learning can drive organizational transformation if these phenomena are properly planned, designed, and facilitated.

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The Learning Organization, vol. 4 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

Steven W. Pool

An organizational development model is developed to measure the constructs of a learning organization. A descriptive study was conducted investigating the relationships of…

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9920

Abstract

An organizational development model is developed to measure the constructs of a learning organization. A descriptive study was conducted investigating the relationships of total quality management, organizational culture and their impact upon a learning organization. The study investigated the attributes of a learning organization and its influence upon employee motivation. A total of 307 executives participated in the survey. The survey revealed that many executives had pursued professional development programs in TQM principles and/or in Senge’s organizational learning principles over the last four years. The executives completed a questionnaire measuring their perceptions involving the principles of a learning organization, TQM attributes, and their organizational culture. The results indicate a corporation implementing TQM principles in a supportive organizational culture has a positive and significant relationship with organizational learning compared to those executives not exposed to these constructs. Also, the findings revealed a positive and significant relationship between a learning organization and the motivational level of its business executives.

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Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 21 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2008

Roland K. Yeo

The purpose of this paper is to discuss several organizational learning frameworks based on Peter Senge's “fifth discipline”. It further explains the antecedent conditions…

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2102

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss several organizational learning frameworks based on Peter Senge's “fifth discipline”. It further explains the antecedent conditions of learning and their relationship with performance outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

Lessons were primarily drawn from a case study of a Singapore manufacturing firm that had gone through a five‐year organizational learning strategic plan.

Findings

Shared vision, flexible systems and team dynamics are key characteristics of organizational learning in which leadership is a crucial enabling agent. Contrary to general perception, systems development would be considered the most significant change brought about by organizational learning.

Research limitations/implications

Organizational learning is not entirely driven by people, process and/or structure. In fact, the direction and degree of organizational learning are dependent on the strategic purpose of the organization. In addition, dialogue and reflection have been found to be the embedded unifiers that link the various facets of learning.

Practical implications

Strategies on organizational learning implementation are based on organizational infrastructures and capacities with a focus on efficiency, effectiveness and transformation. Several immediate concerns are the eradication of learning impediments, improvement on work processes and institutionalization of learning as integral to work practices.

Originality/value

Organizational learning is not simply a buzzword that resides in the minds of leaders. It can be successfully implemented with strong leadership and a shared vision. Most importantly, employees must be prepared for continuous changes and renewal.

Details

Business Strategy Series, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-5637

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Atul Gupta and Glen Thomas

Organization learning has assumed a major role in modern management as a tool for coping with change and uncertainty. Organizations must adapt to shifting demands in an…

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1605

Abstract

Organization learning has assumed a major role in modern management as a tool for coping with change and uncertainty. Organizations must adapt to shifting demands in an environment where chaos is common. The organizations which can make such changes and thrive are those which embrace the philosophy of organizational learning. This paper is an attempt to assess the application of organization learning concepts using a real organization.

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Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 101 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 2 February 2015

Ulrik Brandi and Rosa Lisa Iannone

This contribution highlights opportunities for new insights into organizational learning processes through the use of practice-based innovative organizational learning

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1477

Abstract

Purpose

This contribution highlights opportunities for new insights into organizational learning processes through the use of practice-based innovative organizational learning technologies (iOLTs). The article explores the varied possibilities and application of learning technologies in terms of organizational learning perspectives.

Design/methodology/approach

Given this is a relatively new field of practice and research, the three organizational learning theoretical perspectives – behavioural, action and practice – form a base upon which we can conceptualise learning as mediated through iOLTs and how we can leverage these technologies, particularly for practice-based organizational learning, which focuses more on the intangibles of learning.

Findings

Due to the pervasive and ubiquitous potential of organizational learning technologies, new avenues for analysing the mediating effect of technologies on learning enable our research and practice attention to shift from formal learning to the informal; from top-down learning management to bottom-up learning creation; from cognitive and behavioural approaches to social, spontaneous and contextual learning – helping us decipher the “language” of learning in concrete ways.

Originality/value

The iOLTs are emerging and at an ever-increasing pace. Practice-based iOLTs can help trace and decipher the “language” of learning in concrete ways, which is a key aspect in our being able to leverage our organizational learning capacities.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2021

Bijaya Mishra and Jagan Mohan Reddy

This paper aims to provide an overview of the Organization Learning and Learning Organization concepts obtaining the perspectives of Professor Mary M. Crossan and presents…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide an overview of the Organization Learning and Learning Organization concepts obtaining the perspectives of Professor Mary M. Crossan and presents an evolution of her immense contribution to the field over the past two decades.

Design/methodology/approach

A conversation with thought-leader, Professor Mary M. Crossan.

Findings

How different “character configurations” and “processes” enhance organization learning across levels in the organization.

Originality/value

The discussion with Professor Mary M. Crossan reveals her take on the evolution of the organizational learning framework and the significant role of the “Leader’s Character” in shaping organizational learning. Exploring this evolution provides the context and impetus to researchers and practice leaders to verify.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2015

Mariia Molodchik and Carlos Jardon

The paper aims to identify particular traits of the Russian context which condition two key enablers of organizational learning: organizational culture and…

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1310

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to identify particular traits of the Russian context which condition two key enablers of organizational learning: organizational culture and transformational leadership.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on a literature review, the study determines management challenges by implementation of organizational learning in the Russian business context. Taking this into account, the authors suggest specific model of organizational learning which contains organizational learning processes, organizational culture oriented towards learning and transformational leadership. Empirical justification of this model is provided using a sample of more than 100 respondents. Partial least squares-analysis is applied to define structural relationships between the elements of proposed model.

Findings

The study reveals the positive and significant influence of transformational leadership and an organizational culture on organizational learning processes. Moreover, transformational leadership is shown to have a positive impact on an organizational culture, confirming the hypothesis regarding the pivotal role of leaders in the Russian business context.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of this study can assist managers doing business in Russia to improve organizational learning processes. The size of the sample appears to be the main limitation of this study. Questions that might also be addressed in additional research concern the influence of organizational learning on the performance of Russian companies.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to a better understanding of the barriers and stimuli exacted on organizational learning and provides empirical evidence of organizational learning practices of Russian companies.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 22 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1999

Claire Massey and Robyn Walker

Suggests that interaction between managers and consultants may be a way for learning organisations to continue learning and developing. Looks at a study into the…

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3646

Abstract

Suggests that interaction between managers and consultants may be a way for learning organisations to continue learning and developing. Looks at a study into the relationship between professional consultants and their clients to identify two leading factors in influencing whether organisational learning occurs. These imply that the consultant is central for the achievement of organisational development and success. Examines two specific cases and concludes that within this context, there are a number of factors that influence whether organisational learning can be achieved, including role assignment and linking individual development to organisational development.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

Keywords

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