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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2005

Maaike Kleinsmann and Rianne Valkenburg

In an empirical study learning opportunities were identified. Learning opportunities are enablers or disablers for the achievement of shared understanding.

Abstract

Purpose

In an empirical study learning opportunities were identified. Learning opportunities are enablers or disablers for the achievement of shared understanding.

Design/methodology/approach

Actors were interviewed about their communication process. The learning history method was used to analyze and structure the data. From the learning histories learning opportunities were derived. Finally, the learning opportunities were categorized.

Findings

Learning opportunities were found on three levels: the actor, project and company level. They were also joined in six themes. Combining these two patterns showed that learning opportunities are interrelated.

Research limitations/implications

The case study done was retrospective for the actors involved. Therefore, only conclusions could be drawn on the achievement of shared understanding. To be able to say more about the creation of shared understanding, following a NPD project real time would be desirable, in future research.

Practical implications

This study shows the importance for managers of looking across boundaries. Only solving problems integrally within the organization will help to solve problems successfully. Knowing the learning opportunities of a NPD project finished, will help them to improve future projects. The explicit use of storytelling during a NPD project may help to create a learning organization with shared understanding between the actors.

Originality/value

Previous research showed, shared understanding is important, to be able to manage the integration of different knowledge domains. However, these studies do not describe learning opportunities for the achievement of shared understanding, which was done in this study.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

David Rae

This paper describes an approach called opportunity centred learning that has been developed by the author and applied in the field of enterprise education. The…

Abstract

This paper describes an approach called opportunity centred learning that has been developed by the author and applied in the field of enterprise education. The relationship between opportunity centred learning and existing theory and practice in learning and education is outlined in comparison with problem‐based learning and action learning, and the process for using it is described. An example of the type of mind‐maps adopted and a short case study illustrate the approach. The conclusions and implications for educational practice including the benefits and limitations of opportunity centred learning are outlined, together with proposed recommendations for further development in emerging areas of enterprise education.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 45 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2020

Andrea Valéria Steil, Denise de Cuffa, Gabriel Horn Iwaya and Roberto Carlos dos Santos Pacheco

This study aims to identify the relation between perceived learning opportunities, behavioral intentions to voluntarily stay or leave technology organizations and employee…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to identify the relation between perceived learning opportunities, behavioral intentions to voluntarily stay or leave technology organizations and employee retention within these organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a survey of 440 employees of a technology organization.

Findings

Learning opportunities perceived by managers and technicians presented significant positive correlations with the intention to stay and significant negative correlations with the intention to leave the organization. No relation was identified between perceived learning opportunities and manager retention. Among technicians, the correlation between perceived learning opportunities and retention was near zero.

Practical implications

If the organization wants to guarantee the intention of professionals to stay in the organization, the “perceived learning opportunities” indicator should have a similar level of importance as other objective indicators, such as performance and achievement.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to identify relations between perceived learning opportunities and behavioral intention to stay and leave of professionals that work in technology organizations.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2018

Chantal Boomaars, Lyle Yorks and Rajna Shetty

This paper aims to examine whether employability activities are driven by employee learning motives and their perception of learning opportunities.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine whether employability activities are driven by employee learning motives and their perception of learning opportunities.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using a closed questionnaire survey from three different profit organizations (N = 405). Hypotheses were tested through hierarchical multiple regression analysis.

Findings

Hierarchical regressions showed that the learning motive “personal development” had a positive relationship with “perceived learning opportunities” and “employability activities,” as hypothesized. “Perceived learning opportunities” did not mediate the relationship between the learning motive “personal development” and “employability activities.” No relationships were found among the learning motives “social pressure,” “perceived learning opportunities” and “employability activities”.

Originality Value

This study is among the first to investigate the motives that employees must engage in individual learning paths. It attempts to predict their self-reported employability activities based on these motives and on the learning opportunities that employees perceive.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2018

Jae Young Lee and Michele C. Welliver

The purpose of this study was to examine the indirect effects of strategic leadership for learning between sales employees’ perceived learning opportunities and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to examine the indirect effects of strategic leadership for learning between sales employees’ perceived learning opportunities and organizational commitment and job performance.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 204 responses from sales employees in a South Korean company were analyzed using path analysis to test the hypothesized model and hypotheses.

Findings

Results of the analysis showed that strategic leadership has a significant indirect effect on the relationship between perceived learning opportunities and job performance and organizational commitment.

Originality/value

The results of this study challenge the belief that providing learning opportunities improves salesperson performance and organizational commitment. The results indicate that the relationship between continuous learning opportunities and performance, as well as between opportunities and organizational commitment, is statistically nonsignificant. However, the authors did find that providing continuous learning opportunities via strategic leadership because learning increases performance and organizational commitment.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 42 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

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Article
Publication date: 25 October 2018

Kelly Dutton

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

Employees are increasingly becoming facilitators of their own professional career path and development. A highly motivated employee wanting to learn and train for their own personal development will be more aware of potential learning opportunities available to them, and will be more inclined to engage in them. For improved productivity and success, organizations need both engaged and committed employees and to offer a range of learning opportunities.

Practical implications

The paper provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world’s leading organizations.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy-to-digest format.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

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Article
Publication date: 21 September 2010

Katja Brundiers, Arnim Wiek and Charles L. Redman

Academic sustainability programs aim to develop key competencies in sustainability, including problem‐solving skills and the ability to collaborate successfully with…

Abstract

Purpose

Academic sustainability programs aim to develop key competencies in sustainability, including problem‐solving skills and the ability to collaborate successfully with experts and stakeholders. These key competencies may be most fully developed in new teaching and learning situations. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the kind of, and extent to which, these key competencies can be acquired in real‐world learning opportunities.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper summarizes key competencies in sustainability, identifies criteria for real‐world learning opportunities in sustainability programs, and draws on dominant real‐world learning models including project‐ and problem‐based learning, service learning, and internships in communities, businesses, and governments. These components are integrated into a framework to design real‐world learning opportunities.

Findings

A “functional and progressive” model of real‐world learning opportunities seems most conducive to introduce students (as well as faculty and community partners) to collaborative research between academic researchers and practitioners. The stepwise process combined with additional principles allows building competencies such as problem solving, linking knowledge to action, and collaborative work, while applying concepts and methods from the field of sustainability.

Practical implications

The paper offers examples of real‐world learning opportunities at the School of Sustainability at Arizona State University, discusses general challenges of implementation and organizational learning, and draws attention to critical success factors such as collaborative design, coordination, and integration in general introductory courses for undergraduate students.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to sustainability education by clarifying how real‐world learning opportunities contribute to the acquisition of key competencies in sustainability. It proposes a functional and progressive model to be integrated into the (undergraduate) curriculum and suggests strategies for its implementation.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Book part
Publication date: 26 October 2015

Karen Hammerness and Kirsti Klette

In the United States, policy discussions of teacher education in relationship to teacher quality have tended to focus more closely around debates about the nature of…

Abstract

In the United States, policy discussions of teacher education in relationship to teacher quality have tended to focus more closely around debates about the nature of teacher preparation and the need for quality teachers to possess advanced degrees or certification. The field is in need of an array of indicators – a set of powerful, well-researched indicators that can be applied to large public universities as well as small regional private colleges, from university-based programs to “alternative” programs and to more “hybrid” programs. These indicators need to be relevant for teacher certification across a variety of age-ranges and developmental stages. In this chapter, we build on a growing conversation about practice in teacher education and efforts on the part of researchers to identify key features of powerful teacher education. We propose that quality teacher education is designed around a clear and shared vision of good teaching; it is coherent in that it links theory with practice and offers opportunities to learn that are aligned with the vision of good teaching; and it offers opportunities to enact teaching. While these features are supported for the most part by growing consensus in the literature (National Research Council, 2010; NCATE, 2010), there is also an emerging empirical base that provides support for the value of these features as well.

Details

Promoting and Sustaining a Quality Teacher Workforce
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-016-2

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2020

Shingairai Grace Masango and Paul Lassalle

There is a growing interest in exploring the interface between international marketing and entrepreneurial opportunities. This paper contributes by defining and…

Abstract

Purpose

There is a growing interest in exploring the interface between international marketing and entrepreneurial opportunities. This paper contributes by defining and elucidating entrepreneurial action in early internationalising software firms and the corresponding emergent international marketing activities. Entrepreneurial action in early internationalising software firms is explored through the operationalisation of a reconceptualised entrepreneurial opportunity construct and the associated entrepreneurial learning processes.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper adopts an inductive approach, which traces the evolution of five early internationalising propriety software South African firms; from the new venture idea to the establishment of the international entrepreneurial opportunity.

Findings

The findings provide support for entrepreneurial action guided by: prior industry experience, entrepreneurial alertness, opportunity confidence and two levels of entrepreneurial learning; experiential and double-loop learning. Learning by doing allows for the continuous evaluation of the new venture idea leading to the international entrepreneurial opportunity. Market responsiveness and continuous product development resulting in the emergence of the firm's inward international marketing activities constitute the key outcomes of entrepreneurial action.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited to a specific technology context, which is young software firms whose inward directed internationalisation activities coalesce around the development of their proprietary software technology.

Originality/value

Based on an original dataset of early internationalising software firms from South Africa, this paper inductively operationalises and conceptualises entrepreneurial action as the combined interaction of four key constructs: contingent effects, attitudes to opportunities, learning by doing and entrepreneurial activities leading to the firm's inward international marketing activities and a diversified international client and end-user base.

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Article
Publication date: 16 January 2017

Rebecca Lowenhaupt and Todd D. Reeves

Changing immigration patterns in the USA have led to a growing number of “new immigrant destinations.” In these contexts, opportunities for teacher learning are crucial…

Abstract

Purpose

Changing immigration patterns in the USA have led to a growing number of “new immigrant destinations.” In these contexts, opportunities for teacher learning are crucial for developing the school capacity to serve the academic, linguistic and socio-cultural needs of immigrant students. In response, the purpose of this paper is to examine how schools in Wisconsin provided both formal and informal teacher learning opportunities to develop the instructional capacity to support recent immigrants, specifically Spanish-speaking English language learners (ELLs).

Design/methodology/approach

Using descriptive analyses of teacher and administrator survey and interview data, this study examined the focus and within-school distribution of formal professional development, as well as teacher collaboration as a mechanism for informal learning.

Findings

Most commonly, professional development focused on concrete strategies teachers might enact in their classrooms, rather than developing broader understandings of the needs of immigrant students. In addition, formal professional development commonly targeted particular groups of teachers, rather than faculty as a whole. Finally, general education-ELL teacher collaboration was most often deployed “as needed” and focused on particular student needs, rather than systematically.

Research limitations/implications

Future work might address the limitations of this study by examining teacher learning opportunities in new immigrant destinations in other locales, the quality and effectiveness of such opportunities, and other mechanisms for the distribution of expertise.

Originality/value

Findings suggest the need for more systematic and integrated approaches to teacher learning in new immigrant destinations, with an emphasis on pushing beyond the short-term need for instructional strategies to develop more holistic, collaborative approaches to integrating ELLs into schools and classrooms.

Details

Journal of Professional Capital and Community, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-9548

Keywords

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