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1 – 10 of over 74000
Article
Publication date: 14 December 2020

Jay Andrew Cohen

As online learning becomes more ubiquitous and particularly in consideration of the current need to move classroom based teaching online given Covid-19, it seems opportune…

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Abstract

Purpose

As online learning becomes more ubiquitous and particularly in consideration of the current need to move classroom based teaching online given Covid-19, it seems opportune to address the pedagogical differences between online and face-to-face teaching, so that online delivery moves beyond the paradigms of its face-to-face counterpart, such as the lecture. This paper explores the need for a fit for purpose pedagogical approach for online learning, as opposed to one in which a classroom based pedagogy is applied, often rather clumsily to an online learning environment.

Design/methodology/approach

The engagement of students in an online learning environment is closely associated with student success. The argument is that students who are actively engaged are more likely to learn and to achieve greater success. Student engagement is facilitated through the design and arrangement of the learning material, and by the presence, attitude and the facilitation of learning by the online teacher or trainer.

Findings

Rather than presenting any research findings this paper simply explores concepts relating to online learning design and online teaching.

Practical implications

The practical implication of this paper are better alignment between teaching/training interventions and learning design.

Originality/value

This paper is a viewpoint paper and is original. This paper has not been submitted elsewhere. 10; 10;This paper would be a valuable resource for those new to online learning or those looking to establish a fit for purpose approach to online learning.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 35 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 November 2009

Allan H.K. Yuen, Liping Deng and Robert Fox

The purpose of this paper is to compare the use of WebCT in support of online and blended learning in the Faculty of Architecture of a Hong Kong university.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare the use of WebCT in support of online and blended learning in the Faculty of Architecture of a Hong Kong university.

Design/methodology/approach

Paper questionnaires are used to collect students' experiences, perceptions and attitudes towards the online course they have undertaken. Focus group interviews are conducted with two groups of students at the end of the semester. In addition, both formal and informal interviews are conducted with the instructor to understand his perceptions and perspectives.

Findings

In general, students prefer to have course management systems (CMS) as a supplement to face‐to‐face lectures rather than as its replacement. They perceive WebCT as mainly a platform for downloading materials and submitting assignments rather than a platform for teaching and learning. Learning fully online is perceived as self‐learning. The traditional lecture is considered more effective and efficient by many students to grasp concepts and principles.

Research limitations/implications

This is an exploratory study at a Hong Kong university. However, it provides initial evidence to shed light on issues concerning the use of CMS in support of online and blended learning.

Practical implications

In order to ensure a more engaging and rewarding online learning experience, teacher's online presence should be strengthened. Other than teacher presence, the cognitive presence could be fostered through engineering the student‐to‐student interaction in co‐located settings.

Originality/value

The paper usefully demonstrates how the blended mode of learning that combines face‐to‐face and online learning has become increasingly popular, while the courses conducted entirely online are comparatively rare at universities in Hong Kong.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 November 2009

Judith McNamara and Catherine Brown

The purpose of this paper is to examine how online discussion can be used in work‐integrated learning as a vehicle for students to demonstrate their learning in the…

1244

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how online discussion can be used in work‐integrated learning as a vehicle for students to demonstrate their learning in the workplace and to facilitate collaborative learning where face‐to‐face classes are not feasible.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper evaluates the use of assessable online discussion in facilitating collaborative learning and scaffolding reflection in work placement subjects. It reviews the literature regarding the use of online discussion, particularly for work placement subjects, and evaluates the use of an online discussion forum in a case study subject in the Queensland University of Technology (QUT) undergraduate law course.

Findings

The paper suggests that assessable online discussion forums are appropriate to facilitate student collaboration and collaborative learning in work placement subjects.

Originality/value

The paper is original in its examination of the assessment of online discussion in a work‐integrated learning context.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Alina Zapalska and Dallas Brozik

The purpose of this paper is to recognize that individual learning styles must be taken into account in the instructional design template used in online education. The…

14750

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to recognize that individual learning styles must be taken into account in the instructional design template used in online education. The paper argues that when students' learning styles are identified, it is possible to define an appropriate context of learning.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper identifies a set of instructional principles for online learning environments that are derived from multiple theories of learning with a consideration of different learning styles. The VARK questionnaire was used to determine learning styles of students who participated in two online courses. The VARK instrument identifies four distinct learning styles: visual (V); aural (A); reading/writing (R) and kinesthetic (K). These four dimensions are used to analyze the appropriateness of online learning structures.

Findings

The paper identifies teaching strategies in online courses while recognizing the four learning styles. The paper concludes that the achievement of online learning can be improved by providing instruction in a manner consistent with each student's learning style. However, it is important to keep in mind that, even if a specific student learns best in a certain way, he or she should be exposed to a variety of learning experiences to become a more versatile online learner.

Originality/value

The new result indicates that students with the auditory learning preference do not select online education as their first choice for learning. The combination of different techniques can make it possible for students with all types of learning styles to be successful in an online course.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2004

William A. Drago and Richard J. Wagner

It has become evident that students have diverse preferred learning styles and effective instructors must design and deliver courses to meet the needs of those students…

13921

Abstract

It has become evident that students have diverse preferred learning styles and effective instructors must design and deliver courses to meet the needs of those students. This study investigates the four physiological learning styles of visual, aural, read‐write and kinesthetic as they apply to online education. Findings suggest that online students are more likely to have stronger visual and read‐write learning styles. Further, read‐write learners and students that were strong across all four learning styles were likely to evaluate course effectiveness lower than other students while aural/readwrite learners and students that were not strong on any learning style were more likely to evaluate course effectiveness higher than other students.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 27 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Stuart Orr and Ray Bantow

Online education has been growing rapidly, but has not had the benefit of the extensive teaching pedagogy development of traditional face‐to‐face teaching. This paper aims…

1478

Abstract

Purpose

Online education has been growing rapidly, but has not had the benefit of the extensive teaching pedagogy development of traditional face‐to‐face teaching. This paper aims to provide a review of the current literature and present the results of a survey, conducted to determine the effectiveness of a graduate online subject.

Design/methodology/approach

The literature was reviewed to identify measures of success and quality in online education delivery. These measures were then considered in relation to their application in practice via a case study based around a survey conducted at Deakin University in Australia.

Findings

A total of 16 relevant measures of teaching quality were identified in the literature. Most measures had elements of bias and some were more generally applicable to online learning. The case study suggested that the value of computer mediated learning in an online environment was limited and that a combination of print and computer mediated conferencing performed better in more of the identified quality matrices.

Practice implications

Online learning does not save teaching resources if standards of quality are maintained. It can be used to provide a remote teaching facility, provided it is backed up by resources such as printed study guides. For the subject evaluated, online mediated learning did not the provide the same quality of education.

Originality/value

Whilst some research has been conducted in this area, no substantive grounded theory has been applied to postgraduate or fee‐paying online education regimes. As a result, case studies of such applications can be very helpful in the design of future teaching systems.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 19 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 September 2010

Jamie Callahan

This paper aims to present an alternative and critical view of online learning for and by HRD professionals.

1159

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present an alternative and critical view of online learning for and by HRD professionals.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is positioned as a conceptual reflection regarding practical implications not frequently considered with regard to implementing online learning systems.

Findings

This paper contends that many of the practical reasons for implementing online learning (accessibility, power equalization, and cost reduction) have fatal flaws.

Research limitations/implications

This paper suggests that researchers broaden their perspectives beyond the assumption that using online learning is the goal to be achieved with regard to teaching and learning HRD. Both traditional and critical perspectives of online learning should be more thoroughly explored through empirical research.

Originality/value

Few conceptual or empirical works challenge the unquestioned hegemony of the appeal of online learning, especially within the field of HRD. This reflection will hopefully serve as a catalyst for research that challenges unquestioned assumptions about online learning as a cutting edge innovation for teaching and learning HRD.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 34 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 October 2022

Maryam Husain Almahdi, Ghadah Al Murshidi and Osama Al-Mahdi

This paper investigates the social online learning experiences of teacher trainees during the COVID-19 pandemic. The study's model gauges the relationships between social…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper investigates the social online learning experiences of teacher trainees during the COVID-19 pandemic. The study's model gauges the relationships between social presence, sense of community, and collaborative learning in online work-based learning environments.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a cross-sectional design, specifically an online questionnaire, to collect data from teacher-trainees in different years of their university programs.

Findings

The findings indicate significant and positive relationships between social presence and both sense of community and collaborative learning, and between collaborative learning and sense of community in a work-based online learning environment. Moreover, collaborative learning was found to mediate the relationship between social presence and sense of community in the study's model.

Research limitations/implications

The use of questionnaires to collect self-reported data from a mostly female undergraduate sample is expected to affect the generalizability of the results. Experiments or observation methods and a wider sample of participants can be used in future research to build on the findings of this study.

Practical implications

The authors recommend that educators play an active role in improving the students' online social learning experiences, especially their social presence and collaborative learning. By using different interactive methods (e.g. encouraging students to ask questions, express emotions, share resources, and reflect on their learning in a group), educators can help students achieve a sense of community and, hence, realize the many beneficial outcomes tied to community creation in online learning environments.

Originality/value

The study contributes to knowledge by highlighting students' social experiences while learning online, a usually overlooked area of study. These insights are especially important in a time when online learning has become a necessity rather than a choice and when students are in dire need of social support and community. Researching the online social learning experiences of teacher-trainees lends additional value to the study, as it is necessary for future teachers to experience and master this type of learning during their pre-service training so they can apply it with higher levels of confidence and efficacy in their future classrooms.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 November 2022

Bipithalal Balakrishnan Nair, M.R. Dileep and Sandeep K. Walia

This study aims to examine the impacts of the forced shift to online/hybrid learning on international students’ perceptions and behaviour. It aims to understand the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the impacts of the forced shift to online/hybrid learning on international students’ perceptions and behaviour. It aims to understand the direction of future university marketing changes to address this vital and urgent concern.

Design/methodology/approach

This study deployed an explorative qualitative design and data collected through interviews (n, 20) with prospective international students.

Findings

The study identified four main themes: mode of class operation, that is, the balance between online/offline/hybrid modes of course delivery; enhanced level of flexibility in terms of both visa regulations and financial aid; strategic use of social media and virtual tools to connect with and impress the international student community; and evidence of digitalization and experiential learning.

Practical implications

This study has many theoretical and managerial implications. As international students perceive COVID-19 as an under-researched theme in the higher education market, the study’s outcome helps understand the grey areas of expectation versus reality in higher education marketing.

Originality/value

This research offers a new perspective from the demand side on higher education marketing strategies amid COVID-19.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 October 2022

Carolyn Caffrey, Hannah Lee, Tessa Withorn, Maggie Clarke, Amalia Castañeda, Kendra Macomber, Kimberly M. Jackson, Jillian Eslami, Aric Haas, Thomas Philo, Elizabeth Galoozis, Wendolyn Vermeer, Anthony Andora and Katie Paris Kohn

This paper presents recently published resources on library instruction and information literacy. It provides an introductory overview and a selected annotated…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper presents recently published resources on library instruction and information literacy. It provides an introductory overview and a selected annotated bibliography of publications covering various library types, study populations and research contexts. The selected bibliography is useful to efficiently keep up with trends in library instruction for busy practitioners, library science students and those wishing to learn about information literacy in other contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

This article annotates 424 English-language periodical articles, monographs, dissertations, theses and reports on library instruction and information literacy published in 2021. The sources were selected from the EBSCO platform for Library, Information Science, and Technology Abstracts (LISTA), Education Resources Information Center (ERIC), Scopus, ProQuest Dissertations and Theses, and WorldCat, published in 2021 that included the terms “information literacy,” “library instruction,” or “information fluency” in the title, abstract or keywords. The sources were organized in Zotero. Annotations summarize the source, focusing on the findings or implications. Each source was categorized into one of seven pre-determined categories: K-12 Education, Children and Adolescents; Academic and Professional Programs; Everyday Life, Community, and the Workplace; Libraries and Health Information Literacy; Multiple Library Types; and Other Information Literacy Research and Theory.

Findings

The paper provides a brief description of 424 sources and highlights sources that contain unique or significant scholarly contributions.

Originality/value

The information may be used by librarians, researchers and anyone interested as a quick and comprehensive reference to literature on library instruction and information literacy within 2021.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 50 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

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