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Book part
Publication date: 23 June 2020

Kechinyere C. Iheduru-Anderson and Monika M. Wahi

This chapter proposes a global agenda to eliminate racism in nursing by targeting reform at nursing education administration internationally. First, the history of racism…

Abstract

This chapter proposes a global agenda to eliminate racism in nursing by targeting reform at nursing education administration internationally. First, the history of racism in nursing is reviewed, along with two models – the diversity model and the cultural competence model – that were applied unsuccessfully to counteract racism in nursing. Second, a description of how racism is entrenched in nursing leadership globally is presented. Third, the recalcitrant structures that serve to maintain institutionalized racism (IR) in the international nursing education system are carefully examined. Specifically, the components and constructs involved in IR in nursing education are delineated, and the way in which these negatively impact both ethnic minority (EM) students and faculty are explained. Based on this, a global agenda to eliminate racism in nursing education internationally is proposed. Eliminating racism in higher education in nursing is a mandatory social responsibility if global healthcare is ever to be equitable. Five actionable recommendations are made to eliminate racism in higher education are summarized as follows: (1) components of nursing programs which are designed to eliminate racism in nursing education should be governed at the country level, (2) to design and implement a system of surveillance of the global nursing community to enable standardized measurement to ensure nursing education programs in all countries are meeting anti-racism benchmark targets, (3) nursing education programs should be established worldwide to provide individual pipeline and mentorship programs to ensure the career success of EM nursing students and faculty, (4) nursing education programs should be conducted to reduce barriers to EM participation in these individual support programs, and (5) nursing education programs are required to teach their nursing faculty skills in developing anti-racist curricula that seeks to eliminate implicit bias.

Details

Civil Society and Social Responsibility in Higher Education: International Perspectives on Curriculum and Teaching Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-464-4

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2008

Paul Crawford, Brian Brown and Pam Majomi

A study of the narratives of community mental health nurses, with an emphasis on education and training, identified education as offering a ‘stepping stone’ out of a…

196

Abstract

A study of the narratives of community mental health nurses, with an emphasis on education and training, identified education as offering a ‘stepping stone’ out of a profession that struggles for recognition and status. This paper describes those narratives and the challenges facing healthcare organisations seeking to assimilate and retain the talent of those who have achieved academic success. The authors suggest that encouraging an expertise that integrates academic and practice skills might be achieved through more widespread appointment of clinical professorships.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 September 2013

Ghaleb Rabab'ah

The study aims to investigate how and why hedges are used in nursing and education academic research articles and find out whether there are differences between the two…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to investigate how and why hedges are used in nursing and education academic research articles and find out whether there are differences between the two disciplines in using hedges and their subcategories.

Design/methodology/approach

The realization of hedges in 50 academic articles representing both disciplines, namely education and nursing, was scrutinized and analyzed.

Findings

The study reveals that there are significant differences between the nursing and education writers' use of hedging in the total use of hedging devices and their subcategories, in favor of the education discipline. This indicates that writers of education articles use hedges more frequently than the writers of nursing articles. In support of previous literature, it concludes that hedging devices are used as communicative strategies to qualify writers' commitment, reduce the force of the researchers' statements, express probability, save the writers' face, persuade readers, and avoid any possible rejection of their statements.

Research limitations/implications

The study was limited to 50 research articles representing both disciplines: education (non-scientific genre) and nursing (scientific genre), and certain hedging devices and their subcategories.

Practical implications

The study recommends that a clear awareness of the pragmatic effect of hedges and the ability to recognize them in texts is crucial to the acquisition of rhetorical competence in any discipline.

Originality/value

Despite the significance of hedging and the extensive research conducted on hedging, no studies have been conducted on nursing and education academic research articles to see how and why hedges are used in these two disciplines. The results can add to the existing literature that this rhetorical strategy is used differently in different disciplines and make an important contribution to the understanding of the practical reasoning and persuasion in nursing and education.

Details

Education, Business and Society: Contemporary Middle Eastern Issues, vol. 6 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-7983

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 July 2019

Janet Richardson, Daniel Clarke, Jane Grose and Paul Warwick

The purpose of this paper is to assess the contribution of scenario-based learning aimed at raising awareness of sustainability in health-care practitioners. The Lancet…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the contribution of scenario-based learning aimed at raising awareness of sustainability in health-care practitioners. The Lancet Countdown on Climate Change calls for urgent action on health and climate change; this requires appropriate knowledge, skills and competencies that can be gained through undergraduate education. The International Council of Nurses calls for leadership in nursing for sustainability; however, climate change and health are given little attention in nursing and health-care curricula.

Design/methodology/approach

A cohort of nursing and midwifery students was introduced to sustainability and climate change in the context of health care through scenario-based learning sessions in each of their three years of undergraduate education. Questionnaires were used to collect data on participant’s attitudes toward sustainability and climate change, how useful the educational sessions were and the extent to which their clinical practice had changed.

Findings

Significant differences were found between scores in Years 1 and 2 suggesting greater awareness of the importance of sustainability in nursing education and practice. Comparison of Years 2 and 3 scores found participants more likely to apply sustainability principles in clinical practice and challenge unsustainable practices in the work environment.

Research limitations/implications

Further research is required to explore sustainability practice in postgraduate nurses/midwives. However, this study supports the need for sustainability education to be embedded within health-care professional degrees through applied and participatory pedagogical approaches.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to evaluate sustainability education and its impact on nursing attitudes towards practice.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 March 2019

Vasanthrie Naidoo and Maureen Nokuthula Sibiya

The purpose of this paper is to share insights, research findings and discuss key issues relating to quality practices and quality assurance in cross-border nursing

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to share insights, research findings and discuss key issues relating to quality practices and quality assurance in cross-border nursing education program development and implementation.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used a qualitative, multiple case-study approach, by sampling local, national and international nursing education institutions, academia and nurse graduates to identify challenges and best operating practices in implementing and facilitating cross-border education.

Findings

The authors reveal that quality assurance affects cross-border nursing education program design, delivery and implementation.

Research limitations/implications

Quality assurance plays an important role in cross-border nursing education, by enhancing the reputation and recognizing the effectiveness and capacity of the educational institution. These findings of this study can offer valuable insight to forthcoming as well as existing nursing education curriculum developers who plan to engage in national or international educational partnerships.

Practical implications

Quality assurance plays an important role in cross-border nursing education, by enhancing the reputation and recognizing the educational institution’s effectiveness and capacity. The findings offer valuable insight into forthcoming and existing nursing education for curriculum developers who plan to engage in national or international educational partnerships.

Originality/value

This paper explores inherent challenges in cross-border nursing education and maximized data collection opportunities by sampling participants from both national and international settings.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 July 2019

Nestor Asiamah, Henry Kofi Mensah and Ben Ocra

The purpose of this paper is to provide an empirical basis for considering in-service training, tenure prolongation and continuing education as methods for enhancing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an empirical basis for considering in-service training, tenure prolongation and continuing education as methods for enhancing nursing performance.

Design/methodology/approach

A self-reported questionnaire was used to collect data from 532 nurses, who were selected using the simple random sampling method from ten hospitals in Accra North, Ghana. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to test the study’s hypotheses.

Findings

The resulting model is of good fit at 5 per cent significance level (χ2=1.492, p=0.222), with in-service training found to be the ultimate method for enhancing nursing performance. The fitted CFA model also shows that in-service training is positively associated with education and tenure at 1 per cent significance level (p<0.001). The overall evidence suggests that training, continuing formal education and tenure prolongation are methods for improving nursing performance.

Originality/value

Apart from its contribution to the literature, this study applies validated primary data to empirically identify key methods for enhancing nursing performance.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 32 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 15 April 2019

Vasanthrie Naidoo and Maureen Nokuthula Sibiya

The purpose of this paper is to share insights, research findings and discuss key issues related to graduate experiences with transnational nursing education (TNE).

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to share insights, research findings and discuss key issues related to graduate experiences with transnational nursing education (TNE).

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used a qualitative approach and sampled national and international nurse graduates to identify challenges and best operating practices in cross-border nursing program facilitation.

Findings

This research paper has provided a platform for graduates to lend their voices to the promotion of effective cross-border nursing education delivery and suggests that although international collaborations endeavor to maintain high academic standards in TNE, there is still a need to re-engineer, revise and adapt curricular content, learning, teaching and assessment practices to aid the nursing student.

Research limitations/implications

Identified challenges affecting the facilitation and delivery of cross-border nursing education programs can act as levers to improving service quality of present and future cross-border programs to the nursing student. This will assist future nursing students to recognize culture shock and embrace their decision to pursue nursing.

Practical implications

The experience of being involved in TNE for nursing students may not be that much different than students of other disciplines. While not able to be generalized to the entire population, the reports by the nursing students in this sample appear to be valuable and worthwhile to continue supporting and encouraging other TNE opportunities.

Originality/value

This paper explores cross-border nursing education experiences from national and international perspectives. The authors were able to explore inherent TNE challenges from diverse population and cultural backgrounds.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2017

Briliya Devadas

The purpose of this study is to investigate factors surrounding low Emirati student recruitment and retention within a nursing programme in the Abu Dhabi Emirate. A…

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to investigate factors surrounding low Emirati student recruitment and retention within a nursing programme in the Abu Dhabi Emirate. A sequential explanatory mixed methods research design was used to collect data from 140 Emirati students at different levels of the nursing program. Questionnaires, semi-structured interviews and related document analyses were used to collect information for this study. Quantitative analysis revealed that overall participants perceived the Emirati society as holding a positive image of nursing, though a majority of them indicated that nursing as a profession, would be a third or last choice of career for them. Inferential analysis on the reasons to choose or not choose nursing, revealed an opportunity to work as part of the team; and as a stepping stone to other professions as significant reasons, versus perceived program difficulty level, and perceived unpleasant tasks. Thematic analysis of interviews highlighted: 1) personal interest; 2) parental support; 3) awareness of the profession; 4) perceived barriers; 5) potential benefits, and 6) policies at the local and national levels. The study has several implications for nursing education and policy in the United Arab Emirates and the region.

.يبظوبأ ةرامإ يف ضيرمتلا جمانرب نمض مهب ظافتحﻻاو نييتارامﻹا ةبلطلا ددع ةلقب ةطيحملا لماوعلا ةسارد وه ةساردلا هذه نم ضرغلا نم تانايبلا عيمجتل ةطلتخم قرط يف لسلستم يثحب ميمصت مادختسا مت دقو 140 .ضيرمتلا جمانرب تايوتسم فلتخم ىلع ايتارامإ ابلاط تسﻻا تلمعتسا ةيبلغأ نأ يمكلا ليلحتلا فشك و .ةساردلا هذهل تامولعملا عمجل ةلصلا تاذ قئاثولا تﻼيلحتو ةمظنملا هبش تﻼباقملاو تانايب ضيرمتلا نأ ىلإ تراشأ مهتيبلغأ نأ نم مغرلا ىلع ،ضيرمتلل ةيباجيإ ةروص لمحي هنأ ىلع يتارامﻹا عمتجملا ىلإ نورظني نيكراشملا مهرايخ نوكيس ،ةنهمك ضيرمتلا رايتخا مدع وأ رايتخا بابسﻷ يلﻻدتسﻻا ليلحتلا يف و .مهل ةبسنلاب ةيفيظولا ةايحلا نم ريخﻷا وأ ثلاثلا ةماه ةيباجيإ بابسأك ،ىرخأ نهمل قﻼطنا ةطقنك وأ ؛قيرفلا نم ءزجك لمعلل ةصرف نع جئاتنلا تفشك ،ةيبلسلاو ةيباجيﻹا بابسﻷا لباقم ا يف و،ضيرمتلا رايتخﻻ رايتخا مدعل ةريبك ةيبلس بابسأ اهنأ ىلع ، اهيف بوغرملا ريغ ماهملاو ،جمانربلا ةبوعص ىوتسم ىلإ رظنلا ،لباقمل :تﻼباقملل يعيضاوملا ليلحتلا زربأو .ةنهمك ضيرمتلا 1 ( ؛ةيصخشلا ةحلصملا 2 ( ؛نيدلاولا معد 3 ( ةنهملاب يعولا ؛ 4 ( ؛ةعقوتملا زجاوحلا 5 ( و ،ةلمتحملا دئاوفلا 6 ( ةلود يف هتاسايسو ضيرمتلا ميلعت ىلع تاروصت ةدع ةساردلا هذهلو .ينطولاو يلحملا نييوتسملا ىلع تاسايسلا ةقطنملاو ةدحتملا ةيبرعلا تارامﻹا .

Details

Learning and Teaching in Higher Education: Gulf Perspectives, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2077-5504

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

Merlyn Ledgister

In this second part of a paper examining the problem of nursing shortages in the health profession in Canada, the author draws on nursing reports from three provinces…

2293

Abstract

In this second part of a paper examining the problem of nursing shortages in the health profession in Canada, the author draws on nursing reports from three provinces, Ontario, British Columbia, and Alberta, to identify how professional associations are dealing with the nursing shortage. Although education is seen as a major key to the nursing dilemma, the author notes that Canadian nurses are already exceedingly well educated. Neither more education nor public relation campaigns have been able to overcome the systemic problems facing the nursing profession today. If there is a solution, it lies in a more integrative approach, where structural issues, value issues, and even legal issues related to statute can be addressed. The author believes that the issue of nursing shortages cannot be resolved without a substantial degree of empowerment and autonomy for the profession.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-0756

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 November 2021

Shaymaa Najm Abed, Amir A. Abdulmuhsin and Abeer F. Alkhwaldi

The health-care services in Iraq currently face many challenges. The most noted is the lack of effective nursing leaders to meet the growing needs of the health-care…

Abstract

Purpose

The health-care services in Iraq currently face many challenges. The most noted is the lack of effective nursing leaders to meet the growing needs of the health-care services. Effective nursing leadership is critical to the health-care system, affecting work performance, quality of care and staff satisfaction. The literature suggests that nursing leaders in Iraq are not adequately trained to provide leadership to improve the nursing profession and have limited involvement in decision-making. The purpose of this study is to explore the views of nurses on what they believe constitutes effective leadership in Iraq.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative methods approach is used involving 20 semi-structured interviews of senior nurses. The sample of nurses came from two large general hospitals in Iraq. The qualitative data was thematically analyzed and interpreted.

Findings

The study results indicated that there were factors that influence the performance of nurse leader, namely, excessive workload, personal relationship with nursing staff, professional recognition of nursing and selection criteria of leaders. Test results show that there were significant differences in views of the nurses toward nurse leaders’ performance. This research concludes that the nurse leader performance in developing countries is affected by excessive workload, personal relationship with nursing staff, professional recognition of nursing and selection criteria of leaders.

Originality/value

The relevance of the study stems from the scarcity of research on the leader performance in developing countries, while studies on the factors influencing the innovative performance of leaders in nurses’ professional are significantly limited. This study is one of the earliest studies that investigate these factors influencing the nurse leader’s performance.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 35 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

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