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Book part
Publication date: 22 November 2012

Lucy Taksa

Purpose – This chapter aims to show that attention to nicknaming as a form of language-making and sensemaking can provide a valuable avenue for exploring employees…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter aims to show that attention to nicknaming as a form of language-making and sensemaking can provide a valuable avenue for exploring employees’ assessments of (mis)behavior. It highlights the connection between gender and language-making as central to the way workers assess and respond to (mis)behavior in different workplaces.

Methodology – The chapter uses an historical perspective and concepts drawn from sociology and organizational theory. It identifies nicknames and nicknaming practices from a wide range of documentary sources and oral sources.

Findings – In considering nicknaming in terms of sensemaking and language-making rather than simply as a form of humor, the chapter shows that derogatory names enable employees to address the tensions and conflicts arising from formal organizational practices, rules, and managerial imperatives and workplace relations. It emphasizes commonalities in nicknaming practices that extend beyond the micro-level of specific workplaces and in doing so illustrates that nicknaming is not simply a manifestation of humor but as importantly of inter-subjective processes through which workers construct group identities to enforce co-produced informal rules of behavior.

Social implications – The chapter illustrates the importance of workplace nicknaming and its implications for the way employees try to influence the behavior of others by condoning and/or shaming those who conform to or defy informal rules.

Originality – The chapter's originality lies in its focus on employees’ own assessments of misbehavior and on commonalities in nicknaming practices in different times and in different places.

Details

Rethinking Misbehavior and Resistance in Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-662-1

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Book part
Publication date: 31 December 2010

Adam Murphree and Deirdre A. Royster

This chapter uses critical race theories to interpret Obama-related content and changing discourse patterns on discussion boards maintained by a pro-gun, overwhelmingly…

Abstract

This chapter uses critical race theories to interpret Obama-related content and changing discourse patterns on discussion boards maintained by a pro-gun, overwhelmingly white, male, and conservative virtual community. Beginning during the 2008 presidential primary season and continuing through Barack Obama's election as president, our analysis focused on the proliferation of negative “nicknames” (“Obamathets”) that were posted in race-oriented discussion threads over 16 months. We identified three types of frequently voiced Obamathets: those indicating general dislike, political disdain, or racial derision, and we analyzed usage patterns – which types of Obamathets appeared and at which times. Our results revealed a changing state of mind – annoyance to extreme anger – among posters whose sense of racial threat seemed increasingly palpable as Obama approached, and eventually won, the presidency. Over time, posts increasingly included racially derisive terms whose incidence intensified after the election and remained high; racially derisive terms overtook terms of general dislike (that had been more popular) as well as terms of political disdain several months into our analysis. Because posters tended to be more openly libertarian in orientation, we doubt our findings would generalize to the majority of conservative whites; however, our findings probably shed considerable light on activist elements among conservatives, including the “Tea Party” movement. Moreover, capturing sentiments expressed in a semiprivate venue – virtual community discussion boards – probably allowed us to uncover less censored racial sentiment (or racetalk) than is typical when social scientists solicit racial opinions from whites in face-to-face interviews, when many may omit racially hostile thoughts to appear more racially sensitive to researchers.

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Race in the Age of Obama
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-167-2

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Book part
Publication date: 18 November 2004

Irma Cantú Woods

Given the considerable interest currently in the field of early childhood on ways culture influences children’s development, in this chapter I present findings from an…

Abstract

Given the considerable interest currently in the field of early childhood on ways culture influences children’s development, in this chapter I present findings from an ethnographic study I conducted over a six-month period that looks at cultural influences on children’s development. The study looks at 20 Mexican-American children living in a low-income neighborhood in a South Texas community. The children and their families were studied in three specific settings: the children’s homes, the neighborhood surrounding the children’s homes, and the Head Start Center the children attended which was located in the neighborhood. The children ranged in age from 3 to 5 years. Research methodology involved participant observation, informal interviewing, formal interviewing, and document analysis. The theories of Bronfenbrenner and Ogbu provide the framework for considering the cultural perspective in looking at children’s development. Numerous possible themes of cultural aspects as uniquely influencing children’s development emerged from the study’s data collection. The theme I address in this chapter is the adults’ use of names when addressing children. The findings of the study are also compared to the criterion of cultural diversity in Developmentally Appropriate Practice in Early Childhood Programs (Bredekamp & Copple, 1997). Implications for future research and early childhood practice are also presented. Finally, I suggest a new metaphor for looking at culture and its influence on child development.

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Social Contexts of Early Education, and Reconceptualizing Play (II)
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-146-0

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2009

Susanne Strömberg and Jan Ch. Karlsson

This article seeks to analyse rituals of humour and joking practices among two groups of meatpacking workers, to better understand the organic dynamics of workplace fun.

Abstract

Purpose

This article seeks to analyse rituals of humour and joking practices among two groups of meatpacking workers, to better understand the organic dynamics of workplace fun.

Design/methodology/approach

This is an ethnographic study of two groups of meatpacking workers within a Swedish food preparation company. Data were collected using multiple methods including observations, field notes, and individual and group interviews.

Findings

This study uncovers ample evidence of joking practices among the workers studied. These are presented on a continuum of pure to applied humour in five types: jokes, physical joking practices, clowning, nicknaming and satire.

Originality/value

This article gives a rich description and analysis of organic workplace humour in a contemporary food production setting and offers a typology of joking practices.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

David Harrison

Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Stuart James

Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

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Article
Publication date: 11 June 2018

JJ Pionke

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the problematic nature of librarian attitudes toward people with disabilities and how a language change to the use of the term…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the problematic nature of librarian attitudes toward people with disabilities and how a language change to the use of the term “functionally diverse” can highlight a greater sense of inclusion and equality, as well as develop a new type of literacy that focuses on understanding and awareness of disabilities, accessibility and difference.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper examines current trends of language use about people with disabilities and then posits a counterpoint by discussing functional diversity as a viable alternative in not just language but also literacy.

Findings

Examples of current problematic language by librarians are drawn from social media and the literature. The examples are deconstructed in regard to why they are problematically exclusive, and then the alternative language of functional diversity is examined as a way to be more inclusive. Developing a new literacy in terms of interaction with functionally diverse people is also discussed.

Originality/value

Library literature on disability largely focuses on a case study approach and on the view of how to assist people with single disabilities. This is one of the very few papers that focuses on discussing the underlying attitudes and assumptions of librarians that make outreach to people with disabilities who use libraries, difficult. This is also one of the few papers that discusses the need for a new type of literacy within librarianship.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 46 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2017

Loyd S. Pettegrew

Health care organizational research should pay greater attention to the specific settings where health is practiced. An ethnographic account of humor, ritual and defiance…

Abstract

Purpose

Health care organizational research should pay greater attention to the specific settings where health is practiced. An ethnographic account of humor, ritual and defiance is presented from 29 months spent in a private, concierge-type radiation oncology center. A thick description of the setting and interaction among center staff and patients is offered in an attempt to establish why qualitative research of health care settings is so important. Findings are compared to Ellingson’s work on health care setting. Humor, ritual and defiance have therapeutic value and deserve greater attention in cancer treatment centers and health care organizations more broadly. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

An ethnographic account of humor, ritual and defiance is presented from 29 months spent in a private, concierge-type radiation oncology center through thick description.

Findings

This study reinforces the literature on the value of institutionalizing humor and ritual to improve patients’ experience in cancer care given the dominance of large public institutions, most easily accessed by academic researchers. Suncoast Coast Radiation Center’s “institutionalized humor” is an important finding that should be examine further. Scholarship can also illuminate the use of ritual in settings where health care is practiced.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited to a particular research setting which is a private, concierge care radiation oncology treatment center in the Southeastern USA.

Practical implications

Cancer care centers should consider carefully institutionalizing humor and ritual into their daily practices. Further, patient defiance should be reinterpreted not as a patient deficiency but as a therapeutic coping mechanism by patients.

Social implications

While nearly half of cancer care in the USA is offered in private, for-profit institutions, the vast majority of the understanding of cancer care comes only from non-profit and government-run institutions. Shining a light of these neglected cancer care settings will add to the understanding and the ability to improve the care offered to patients.

Originality/value

This is the first health ethnography in a concierge care, cancer care treatment setting. It tests the proposition that humor, ritual and defiance play an important role in a private concierge cancer care organization.

Details

Journal of Organizational Ethnography, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6749

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1983

Margaret G. Bronner, Evelyn Haynes, Roberta MacArthur, Mel Westerman, Carol J. Vetich and Anne Eriksen

ADMINISTRATIVE AGENCIES — UNITED STATES — DIRECTORIES Federal Yellow Book; A Loose‐Leaf Directory of Federal Departments and Agencies. 1976‐ . Updates are issued every two…

Abstract

ADMINISTRATIVE AGENCIES — UNITED STATES — DIRECTORIES Federal Yellow Book; A Loose‐Leaf Directory of Federal Departments and Agencies. 1976‐ . Updates are issued every two months, comprising at least two complete issues every twelve months. $130.00. Washington Monitor, Inc. 499 National Press Building, Washington, DC 20045. Ed.: Teri Calabrese. Circ.: unknown. Indexed: self‐indexed. LC 78‐642223. ISSN 0145‐6202. OCLC 266012. The Washington Monitor publishes two yellow books: the Congressional Yellow Book, a directory of members of Congress, committee assignments and staff; and the Federal Yellow Book, a loose‐leaf directory of the personnel in federal departments and agencies, including the White House and the Executive Office of the President. The loose‐leaf format enables the publisher to keep the information up to date by replacement pages issued every other month.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Book part
Publication date: 10 May 2016

Sara Delamont

To demonstrate why leaving the ethnographic field provides an excellent opportunity for the researcher to engage in reflexivity on all aspects of the research and…

Abstract

Purpose

To demonstrate why leaving the ethnographic field provides an excellent opportunity for the researcher to engage in reflexivity on all aspects of the research and especially on issues of power, age and gender.

Methodology/approach

An autobiographical reflection on a 40 year career as an ethnographer.

Findings

The autobiographical literature and the methods literature on ethnography has neglected leaving the field, and the opportunities that process provides for reflectivity. The author reflects on issues of power, age and gender as they have been implicated in the various fieldsites studied in her career. The particular field site featured centrally is two martial arts, savate and capoeira.

Originality/value

To improve the quality of reflexive writing on leaving the field.

Details

Gender Identity and Research Relationships
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-025-1

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