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Book part
Publication date: 5 September 2022

Emily Russo, Dana L. Ott and Miriam Moeller

Despite many neurodiverse individuals possessing skills that are desperately needed, few organizations have redesigned their attraction, development and retention…

Abstract

Despite many neurodiverse individuals possessing skills that are desperately needed, few organizations have redesigned their attraction, development and retention practices to capture them. In this chapter, we alert organizations that embracing neurodiversity bodes well for expanding the diversity of the talent pool, thereby mitigating talent risks. We proceed to analyse and explain how neurodiversity can be positioned within the talent management literature and identify opportunities for integrating neurodiversity and talent management research. We begin by exploring the concept of neurodiversity and in particular neurodiversity in the workplace. We then use this foundation to establish how neurodiversity can be engaged within the talent management literature. Finally, we outline a plethora of future research questions and avenues to further explore neurodiversity in the context of talent management.

Details

Diversity in Action
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-227-1

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 9 November 2020

Kristen Gillespie-Lynch, Patrick Dwyer, Christopher Constantino, Steven K. Kapp, Emily Hotez, Ariana Riccio, Danielle DeNigris, Bella Kofner and Eric Endlich

Purpose: We critically examine the idea of neurodiversity, or the uniqueness of all brains, as the foundation for the neurodiversity movement, which began as an autism…

Abstract

Purpose: We critically examine the idea of neurodiversity, or the uniqueness of all brains, as the foundation for the neurodiversity movement, which began as an autism rights movement. We explore the neurodiversity movement's potential to support cross-disability alliances that can transform cultures.

Methods/Approach: A neurodiverse team reviewed literature about the history of the neurodiversity movement and associated participatory research methodologies and drew from our experiences guiding programs led, to varying degrees, by neurodivergent people. We highlight two programs for autistic university students, one started by and for autistics and one developed in collaboration with autistic and nonautistic students. These programs are contrasted with a national self-help group started by and for stutterers that is inclusive of “neurotypicals.”

Findings: Neurodiversity-aligned practices have emerged in diverse communities. Similar benefits and challenges of alliance building within versus across neurotypes were apparent in communities that had not been in close contact. Neurodiversity provides a framework that people with diverse conditions can use to identify and work together to challenge shared forms of oppression. However, people interpret the neurodiversity movement in diverse ways. By honing in on core aspects of the neurodiversity paradigm, we can foster alliances across diverse perspectives.

Implications/ Values: Becoming aware of power imbalances and working to rectify them is essential for building effective alliances across neurotypes. Sufficient space and time are needed to create healthy alliances. Participatory approaches, and approaches solely led by neurodivergent people, can begin to address concerns about power and representation within the neurodiversity movement while shifting public understanding.

Details

Disability Alliances and Allies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-322-7

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Article
Publication date: 21 March 2022

Josephine Go Jefferies and Wasim Ahmed

The purpose of this study is to develop a bottom-up segmentation of people affected by neurodiversity using Twitter data.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to develop a bottom-up segmentation of people affected by neurodiversity using Twitter data.

Design/methodology/approach

This exploratory study uses content analysis of information shared by Twitter users over a three-month period.

Findings

Cultural currents affect how the label of “neurodiversity” is perceived by individuals, marketplace actors and society. The extent to which neurodiversity provides a positive or negative alternative to stigmatizing labels for mental disorders is shaped by differentiated experiences of neurodiversity. The authors identify five neurodiversity segments according to identifiable concerns and contextual dynamics that affect mental wellbeing. Analyzing Twitter data enables a bottom-up typology of stigmatized groups toward improving market salience.

Originality/value

To the authors knowledge, this study is the first to investigate neurodiversity using Twitter data to segment stigmatized consumers into prospective customers from the bottom-up.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 39 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2019

James Richards, Kate Sang, Abigail Marks and Susannah Gill

The purpose of this paper is to address a significant gap in the line manager, HRM and the diversity management literature, that of exploring the role and significance of…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address a significant gap in the line manager, HRM and the diversity management literature, that of exploring the role and significance of emotional labour (EL) in relation to the lived experienced of line managing neurodiversity.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach was used to explore lived experiences of line managers responsible for managing neurodiverse employees. Interviews were conducted with line managers employed in the UK transport industry.

Findings

The findings provide rich insights into line managing neurodiversity. A key overall finding is reasonable adjustments deemed essential to support neurodiverse employees require a myriad of hidden, complex, time consuming and often emotionally draining interactions with disabled employees, the employee’s wider team, and HRM and occupational health (OH) practitioners.

Research limitations/implications

This is an exploratory study and therefore limited by nature of the research design, industry focus, scope of study and sample size.

Practical implications

The findings have the potential to inform HRM and OH practitioner support for line managers responsible for managing neurodiverse employees.

Social implications

The study contributes to wider societal attempts to make employment more inclusive to a range of historically disadvantaged groups.

Originality/value

The study fills an important gap in the HRM literature on line managing neurodiverse employees. The study makes a specific and unique contribution to extensive literatures on line management, disability and EL.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 48 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 28 February 2022

Ashley Molloy, Ashley O'Donoghue and Na Fu

Generation A, the number of people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) entering the workforce in the next decade is expected to increase. However, the employment rate of…

Abstract

Generation A, the number of people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) entering the workforce in the next decade is expected to increase. However, the employment rate of people with ASD is still very low, and the access to services and support for them is inadequate globally. The research is very limited on understanding neurodiversity-based employment and its success factors. This study aims to fill this important gap via exploring the current inclusive human resource practices being adopted by neurodiversity champion companies. Interviews were conducted with six Irish organizations to identify their neurodiversity and autism practices.

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 25 May 2021

Nancy Doyle and Almuth McDowall

The aims of the paper were to highlight the dearth of applied practitioner research concerning the expression of neurodiversity at work and develop an epistemological…

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Abstract

Purpose

The aims of the paper were to highlight the dearth of applied practitioner research concerning the expression of neurodiversity at work and develop an epistemological framework for a future research agenda.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic empty review protocol was employed, with three a priori research questions, inquiring as to the extent of neurodiversity research within mainstream work psychology, psychology in general and lastly within cross-disciplinary academic research. The results of the final search were quality checked and categorized to illustrate where studies relevant to practice are currently located.

Findings

The academic literature was found to be lacking in contextualized, practical advice for employers or employees. The location and foci of extracted studies highlighted a growing science-practitioner gap.

Research limitations/implications

The research focused on common neurominority conditions such as autism and dyslexia; it is acknowledged that the neurodiversity definition itself is broader and more anthropological in nature. A need for a comprehensive research agenda is articulated, and research questions and frameworks are proposed.

Practical implications

Guidance is given on applying disability accommodation to both individual and organizational targets.

Social implications

The disability employment gap is unchanged since legislation was introduced. The neurodiversity concept is no longer new, and it is time for multi-disciplinary collaborations across science and practice to address the questions raised in this paper.

Originality/value

This paper offers an original analysis of the neurodiversity paradox, combining systematic inquiry with a narrative synthesis of the extant literature. The conceptual clarification offers clear directions for researchers and practitioners.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 41 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

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Article
Publication date: 31 January 2011

Robin Mackenzie and John Watts

Should those of us who are neurologically atypical be diagnosed as ill, so in need of treatment or cure, or accepted as embodying a different way of being, as called for…

Abstract

Should those of us who are neurologically atypical be diagnosed as ill, so in need of treatment or cure, or accepted as embodying a different way of being, as called for by the neurodiversity movement? We consider what legal structures and health and social care systems would be appropriate to promote neurodiversity, and how far this infrastructure in the United Kingdom today meets these criteria for those diagnosed with cognitive disability and learning disability.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

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Article
Publication date: 22 March 2021

Joanna Maria Szulc, Julie Davies, Michał T. Tomczak and Frances-Louise McGregor

Existing management research and management practices frequently overlook the relationship between the above-average human capital of highly functioning neurodivergent…

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Abstract

Purpose

Existing management research and management practices frequently overlook the relationship between the above-average human capital of highly functioning neurodivergent employees, their subjective well-being in the workplace and performance outcomes. This paper calls for greater attention to the hidden human capital associated with neurodiversity by mainstreaming implementation of neurodiversity-friendly policies and practices.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on the ability, motivation and opportunity (AMO) framework, this conceptual paper integrates research on employee neurodiversity and well-being to provide a model of HR-systems level and human capital development policies, systems and practices for neurodivergent minorities in the workplace.

Findings

This paper illustrates that workplace neurodiversity, like biodiversity, is a natural phenomenon. For subjective individual psychological and organisational well-being, neurodivergent employees require an empathetic culture and innovative talent management approaches that respect cognitive differences.

Practical implications

The case is made for neurodivergent human capital development and policy-makers to promote inclusive employment and decent work in a context of relatively high unemployment for neurodivergent individuals.

Originality/value

This paper extends current debates on organisational equality, diversity and inclusion to a consideration of workplace well-being for highly functioning neurodivergent workers. It calls for more equitable and empathetic approaches to investing in employees with neurodevelopmental and cognitive disabilities.

Details

Employee Relations: The International Journal, vol. 43 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 25 September 2019

Bramhani Rao and Jyothi Polepeddi

This study aims to develop and propose a Neurodiversity-Smart HR framework that may facilitate organizations to build an inclusive workforce.

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to develop and propose a Neurodiversity-Smart HR framework that may facilitate organizations to build an inclusive workforce.

Design/methodology/approach

Real cases of inclusive companies in India such as Lemon Tree Hotels have been explored in detail through observations, video interviews of company’s leadership and personal discussion with special-needs community to design a generalized framework.

Findings

Development of Neurodiversity-Smart HR framework that integrates resources from multiple stakeholders.

Practical implications

The proposed framework shall facilitate organizations to build an inclusive workforce and engage with the special-needs community throughout the inclusion process. The neurodiversity approach is a potential solution to organizational issues such as innovation, engagement, social responsibility and attrition.

Originality/value

The only study to propose a functional inclusive employment framework.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 18 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 October 2022

Joanna Maria Szulc

The aim of this article is to extend current debates on organizational equality, diversity and inclusion to a consideration of neurodivergence in the remote workplace context.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this article is to extend current debates on organizational equality, diversity and inclusion to a consideration of neurodivergence in the remote workplace context.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on the ability, motivation, and opportunity (AMO) model and an emerging strength-based approach to neurodiversity, this conceptual paper integrates research on neurodiversity at work and remote working to provide a novel AMO model for a neuro-inclusive remote workplace.

Findings

Through a theoretically informed discussion of barriers to effective remote work from the perspective of neurominorities, the AMO model for the neuro-inclusive remote workplace is offered to assist organizations in creating an inclusive remote work environment where both neurominorities and neurotypicals can equally contribute to organizational success. Specific examples of how certain barriers to effective remote work can be mitigated are outlined and explained.

Practical implications

The conceptual model presented in this paper can assist HR practitioners in developing a comprehensive approach to skill, motivation, and opportunity-enhancing practices that are tailored to the unique needs of neurominorities in a specific context of remote work to generate mutual gains.

Originality/value

The model of interactions between individual and system factors offered enables a better theoretical understanding of the conditions under which high performance of neurodivergent individuals could be achieved with an associated positive impact on their well-being. The paper contributes to recent calls for more equitable and empathetic approaches to investing in employees with different cognitive profiles and does so in the underexplored context of remote work.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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1 – 10 of 199