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Article
Publication date: 31 July 2009

Prateek Goorha

The purpose of this paper is to suggest how enabling policy should be focused in a knowledge economy by developing the concept of a knowledge economy social network (KESN).

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1076

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to suggest how enabling policy should be focused in a knowledge economy by developing the concept of a knowledge economy social network (KESN).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper employs an interdisciplinary approach in developing the KESN by drawing on concepts and methodology from economics, political science and social network theory.

Findings

The KESN's social capital is defined. As such, maintaining accountability, increasing cohesion and connections among knowledge actors are suggested as relevant guidelines for policy in the KESN.

Research limitations/implications

The knowledge economy should ideally be seen as having unique needs compared to the traditional economy in devising policy.

Practical implications

The paper suggests using the KESN as a basis for devising policy for a knowledge economy.

Originality/value

The paper uses an interdisciplinary approach to studying the knowledge economy and introduces the KESN.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 36 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Book part
Publication date: 26 October 2021

Denise Bedford and Thomas W. Sanchez

In this chapter, the authors highlight the emerging discipline of network sciences and the evolution and adaptation of human networks. The change is considered in the…

Abstract

Chapter Summary

In this chapter, the authors highlight the emerging discipline of network sciences and the evolution and adaptation of human networks. The change is considered in the context of a shifting economic landscape and the importance of knowledge in the twenty-first-century knowledge economy. The chapter offers a fundamental definition of networks and explores the shifting geography of networks. Specifically, the authors explore door-to-door, place-to-place, and person-to-person network geographies. The authors model economic systems as networks and explain the role of human, structural, and relational capital as nodes, messages, and links in networks.

Details

Knowledge Networks
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-949-9

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Article
Publication date: 15 February 2013

Lars‐Gunnar Mattsson and Asta Salmi

This paper aims to discuss the important and changing role of personal networks for transformation in Russia, and the related challenges for management. Formal…

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1262

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to discuss the important and changing role of personal networks for transformation in Russia, and the related challenges for management. Formal institutions supporting the transformation to a market economy have been weak and Russian managers still tend to rely on personal networks. While these networks are important in all economies, they play a different role in full‐fledged market economies than in planned economies.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is conceptual and is based on literature on the nature of markets, the Soviet planned economy, and the transformation process in Russia. A business network approach is used to understand markets and focus on the dynamics of overlapping business and personal networks.

Findings

Overlapping between business networks involving non‐Russian networks and between personal and business networks are important drivers of transformation. The challenges for management in Russia are both organizational and strategic, and transformation implies substantial changes in the network structures.

Research limitations/implications

The authors recommend further empirical analysis of the role that the overlapping of business and personal networks plays in transformation, as well as its managerial implications.

Practical implications

This paper shows why firms must build business relationships during transformation that are integrated in nature and in which personal relations support the technical, logistical, financial, and knowledge exchange dimensions.

Originality/value

This paper challenges the dominating view of transformation, which says that market exchange is transactional, impersonal, and competition‐driven. The paper analyzes transformation in Russia as a network overlapping process in which the role of personal relations changes.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Georgios I. Zekos

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination…

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53910

Abstract

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination of some legal aspects concerning MNEs, cyberspace and e‐commerce as the means of expression of the digital economy. The whole effort of the author is focused on the examination of various aspects of MNEs and their impact upon globalisation and vice versa and how and if we are moving towards a global digital economy.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 45 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Thang V. Nguyen, Garry D. Bruton and Binh T. Nguyen

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether competitor concentration relates to better customer acceptance of the firm’s offerings and better networking of the firm…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether competitor concentration relates to better customer acceptance of the firm’s offerings and better networking of the firm with competitors and government officials.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is conducted in the context of the transition economy of Vietnam, using a combination of methods. Qualitative interviews are followed by a survey of 199 small firms in Hanoi, Vietnam. Since competitor concentration is count data, Poisson regression is used to test the relationship between networking, customer acceptance, and competitor concentration.

Findings

The results show that locating in a competitor concentration area improves customer acceptance of the firm’s offerings and increases networking with competitors, while decreasing networking with government officials. Competitor concentration does not help improve firm performance.

Research limitations/implications

A sample of 199 businesses in the food, furniture, and jewelry sectors in Hanoi may not be representative of all private businesses in Vietnam. The use of cross-sectional data could not establish causational relationships among variables.

Practical implications

Small firms in transition economies should be aware of the trade-offs between initial customer acceptance and negative consequences of being in a competitor concentrated area. Thus, once the firm’s offerings are generally accepted by customers, the firm may consider moving out of competitor concentration areas to expand and differentiate.

Originality/value

This paper points out that in the absence of effective market institutions, businesses want to be located near a concentration of similar firms as a means of gaining initial customer acceptance. This initial acceptance does not necessarily help firms improve business performance beyond the firm’s survival.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Vanessa Ratten, Joao Ferreira and Cristina Fernandes

The purpose of this paper is to examine how entrepreneurs in emerging economies use their knowledge to help create new businesses and increase their profitability in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how entrepreneurs in emerging economies use their knowledge to help create new businesses and increase their profitability in the international marketplace. Emerging economies are playing an increasingly important part in the global marketplace, particularly in terms of how they use knowledge-based resources and entrepreneurial networks.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodological approach of this paper is to analyse the entrepreneurial processes in emerging economies by using the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM) to evaluate whether the stage of economic development affects intention rates of individuals to start new businesses. Utilising a panel approach to evaluating entrepreneurial intention from 2009 to 2013, a number of hypotheses are tested to see how entrepreneurial knowledge and network knowledge affect the likelihood to engage in new business activity.

Findings

These hypotheses are analysed based on the economic development stage of a country. The findings of the hypotheses suggest that entrepreneurial and network knowledge can help determine an individual’s intention to start a business, but although network knowledge is related to economic development, entrepreneurial knowledge is not significant.

Research limitations/implications

The GEM report is helpful in seeing longitudinal changes in entrepreneurship from emerging economies. This helps increase research interest in emerging economies by encouraging more appropriate policy aimed at increasing new business creation.

Practical implications

Implications for entrepreneurs and public policymakers in emerging economies are stated, which suggest that it is important to foster entrepreneurship education. Suggestions for future research linking knowledge-based resources and entrepreneurial intentions in emerging economies are also highlighted.

Originality/value

The findings demonstrate that the propensity of individuals to engage in new business creation in emerging economies is different to those in developed countries because of funding constraints and lack of access to the appropriate skills.

Details

Review of International Business and Strategy, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-6014

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Article
Publication date: 17 October 2016

Tibor Mandják and Judit Simon

The purpose of this paper is to address two questions: how do business and political (i.e. party politics and state) networks relate? What are the consequences of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address two questions: how do business and political (i.e. party politics and state) networks relate? What are the consequences of the relations between these two networks for the behaviour of the actors involved?

Design/methodology/approach

The research design consists of the historical approach based on relevant literature sources of the past, a relatively long period – from 1968, the beginning of the era of market socialism, until the first decade of the twenty-first century, by which time the market economy had been established for more than 20 years. The authors analyse the behaviour of economic and non-economic actors in Hungary based on cases and historical data, applying the IMP network approach.

Findings

Research findings demonstrate the long-term influence of the relation between business and bureaucratic networks on managerial and organizational network behaviour. The old and new pictures of the economic system are different, but the background to the pictures and the movement in the two pictures are quite similar.

Research limitations/implications

The historical illustrations and cases the authors have presented cannot be too widely generalized: the characteristics of the Hungarian mode of transition from market socialism to market economy impose important limitations on the generalizability of the findings.

Practical implications

The study offers lessons to policy makers: policy decisions can have long term, unanticipated impacts on non-target areas as well.

Social implications

The results confirm that the informal networks of socialism can replicate themselves and network structures can be repurposed in the system after the transition as well.

Originality/value

One contribution of the paper is related to the second network paradox: the cases illustrate non-business relationships with non-economic factors, particularly relations with bureaucracy. The other contribution is the description of how the transition from socialism to capitalism affected the networks that firms were embedded in before and after the transition.

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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

Allison Wiles and Alleah Crawford

The purpose of this study was utilize the experience economy to assess the value of the network hospitality experience for the guest and to develop a better understanding…

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2380

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was utilize the experience economy to assess the value of the network hospitality experience for the guest and to develop a better understanding of network hospitality as a unique alternative to traditional lodging.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a mixed-methods approach, relying on content analysis and interpretive phenomenological analysis to answer the research questions. Guest reviews of hosts for a lodging-specific network hospitality website were used as the data source for this study.

Findings

The educational dimension of the experience economy was most represented during network hospitality experiences. Additionally, the factors that create value for network hospitality users include verbal communication, a sense of feeling at home, engagement in entertainment, food and beverage and the functional experience while the spirit of network hospitality, reciprocity and desire for continuation through future intention can have a great impact on the travel and tourism industry.

Originality/value

This research adds value to the current literature by providing a better understanding of the experience economy at work in network hospitality, primarily education and esthetics. Additionally a better understanding of what factors of the network hospitality experience create value for guests is developed. This work focuses on a fast-growing substitute for traditional lodging and therefore needs to be better understood.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 29 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2016

Yaqing Lin, Yan Li, Shuming Zhao and Steven Armstrong

By incorporating the resource-based view with the dynamic capability view, this study aims to examine the link between corporate political networking strategy and firm…

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1182

Abstract

Purpose

By incorporating the resource-based view with the dynamic capability view, this study aims to examine the link between corporate political networking strategy and firm performance in transition economies by focusing on the mediating role of corporate entrepreneurship and the moderating role of dysfunctional competition.

Design/methodology/approach

A large-scale questionnaire survey was conducted among 1,300 senior managers from 650 enterprises in China, and valid survey data were obtained from 401 enterprises.

Findings

Empirical results demonstrate that political networking strategy is positively related to firm performance and that this relationship is fully mediated by corporate entrepreneurship. Moderated path analysis indicates that dysfunctional competition strengthens the direct effect of political networking strategy on corporate entrepreneurship and its indirect effect on firm performance via corporate entrepreneurship.

Originality/value

This research is among the first to examine the mediating mechanism underlying the relationship between political networking strategy and firm performance in the context of transition economies. In addition, existing research has seldom discussed the effects on corporate entrepreneurship of external resource acquisition from government sources. This research fills this important gap and identifies the condition under which political networking benefits corporate entrepreneurship.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

Simon Forge

Are we now entering the era of a new type of economy, with new rules? What we perceive is more than just an addition to today’s economics. By removing the effects of…

Abstract

Are we now entering the era of a new type of economy, with new rules? What we perceive is more than just an addition to today’s economics. By removing the effects of distance, and giving more equal access across nations and classes, networks will effectively reengineer our basic economic equations. Electronic networks can provide access to skills, work and commerce at much lower cost, via electronic markets in jobs, products, services and education. At the same time, they introduce new economic behaviour, as a large enough quantitative change becomes a qualitative change. Electronics and optics enable the networking of human capital, expanding its application and accelerating its enrichment via education. So knowledge‐based operations may slowly replace traditional capital‐based assets. Consequently, the conventional process for the creation of wealth with its prerequisites for capital investment is revised:economic value in traditional fixed assets is replaced by “electronic assets”. At the same time, the network effect pushes the market mechanism to its limits, through a step‐change in breadth of access, reduced costs of entry and pace of trading. National differences and national markets, all the trappings and devices of commercial locality, are challenged. In this first of two articles, the initial conditions and the evidence for change are examined and the emergence of a new form of economy, or “tele‐economy”, is reviewed. Following from this, a view of the form of capitalism driving the economic environment – “electronic capitalism” – is put forward. The second article, to be published in a forthcoming issue of foresight, examines the consequences and conclusions on assets, wealth accumulation, national players and the benefits and dangers of a tele‐economy.

Details

Foresight, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

Keywords

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