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Article
Publication date: 4 October 2011

Joacim Hansson

The purpose of the paper is to report the findings of a Swedish national survey study finalised in late 2010. The purpose of the project was to create a picture of Swedish…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to report the findings of a Swedish national survey study finalised in late 2010. The purpose of the project was to create a picture of Swedish library services directed to the five minority groups defined as “national minorities” in the country: Romani, Sámi, Jews, Tornedalians and Swedish Finns. The study focuses on media, cultural activities, and co‐operation.

Design/methodology/approach

In the study, a survey questionnaire was used as the primary method. The questionnaire was sent to all 289 county libraries of Sweden. A total of 181 were returned and used in the study. The theoretical stance is emancipatory in that it takes the position that libraries may play a vital role not only for the social integration of the concerned minority groups, but also for spreading interest in, and understanding of, the unique identities of these groups in the majority society.

Findings

The findings of the study show that Swedish public libraries have very limited services towards the national minority groups in focus. In some cases, like service to the elderly and out‐reach activity, no activity whatsoever could be measured.

Originality/value

The research reported in the article is original in that it is the first time that the services to the national minority groups of Sweden are mapped and measured at a national level. The value of the result is high as it shows major weaknesses in library services and the study provides a good point of departure for developing minority services in Swedish libraries.

Details

New Library World, vol. 112 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Book part
Publication date: 16 August 2016

Ana Ljubojević

The focus of this paper is a comparative case study of the symbolic role of the Croatian and Serbian languages and writing in discourses of the Nation and the National

Abstract

The focus of this paper is a comparative case study of the symbolic role of the Croatian and Serbian languages and writing in discourses of the Nation and the National. Our research is situated at the intersection of the scientific fields of sociolinguistics, memory studies, and studies on nationalism. Using Anthony D. Smith’s ethno-symbolist approach to the study of nationalism, which focuses on the reciprocal relationship between elites and the people, we analyze the case of anti-Cyrillic protests in Vukovar, Croatia, which were triggered by the implementation of Croatian minority rights legislation. This research analyses the role of language and its use as a symbol in memory practices and accompanying discourses in Croatia and its echoes in Serbian public space. The top-down perspective observes state-promoted events and populist implications of language mis(use). Alternatively, the bottom-up approach encompasses various actions and initiatives of so-called “activists” who belong either to “nationalist” organizations or to liberal/democratic NGOs. The majority of voices that are not aligned with the above-mentioned organizations are neglected in the public space (Obradovic-Wochnik, 2013).

We explore the dynamics created between social groups promoting populist ideas, other groups promoting alternative practices, and their influence on the ideological pattern adopted by ruling elites.

Details

Narratives of Identity in Social Movements, Conflicts and Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-078-7

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Book part
Publication date: 29 October 2003

Tordis Borchgrevink and Grete Brochmann

“Multiculturalism” is a troubled concept, in a political as well as in a scholarly sense. What has triggered this paper is the authors’ experience of the hardships…

Abstract

“Multiculturalism” is a troubled concept, in a political as well as in a scholarly sense. What has triggered this paper is the authors’ experience of the hardships involved in understanding the power structures embedded in societies termed “multicultural”; we find ourselves equipped with a set of conceptual tools that are confusing, and with policy makers that compound that confusion. This presentation takes as its point of departure the tension engendered at the interface between popular democracy ground rules and minority rights, and turns in its second part to current political vocabulary in Norway. Thematically, the discussion moves from the intricacies of “cultural rights” to a closer look at the bias implicit in the benevolent phrase “fair terms of integration.” The suggestion is that hidden underneath the niceties, we find the unavoidable and seemingly unspeakable dilemmas of a welfare state confronted with non-economic, humanitarian principles. Let us be clear about one thing, however; the aim of this presentation is not to solve problems, but to face them.

Details

Multicultural Challenge
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-064-7

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Article
Publication date: 22 November 2011

Sanjica Faletar Tanackovic, Darko Lacovic and Snjezana Stanarevic

The purpose of this paper is to present the findings of a small scale study the aim of which was to survey the information needs and library usage of major…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the findings of a small scale study the aim of which was to survey the information needs and library usage of major long‐established national minorities (Serbian, Hungarian and Slovak) in eastern Croatia (Osijek‐Baranya county); in particular in relation to the information and reading material in their native languages.

Design/methodology/approach

Owing to spatial limitations this paper focuses on the Serbian national minority. Data were gathered with the help of quantitative methodology. Self‐administered questionnaires were distributed through Serbian cultural associations (the snowball sampling method). In total, 140 valid and usable questionnaires were returned. Descriptive statistics and variant analysis were used to analyse the data.

Findings

The study indicated that respondents had the need for diverse information and reading material in their mother tongue and that for that purpose they used public libraries less often than some other information sources, such as TV, newspapers, internet and local Serbian cultural associations.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations of the research are inherent in the methodology. The authors will, in the next phase of the project, carry out in‐depth interviews with respondents.

Practical implications

The importance of this research lies in its implications for the development of library services to multicultural communities in Croatia, as well as offering suggestions for improving collection building in Croatian public libraries. This study could encourage librarians in Croatia to systematically collect and analyse information about their local community minorities; especially their library and information needs.

Originality/value

This is the first investigation into the information needs and library usage of long‐established national minorities in Croatia.

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Book part
Publication date: 22 November 2019

Christina Rodell Olgaç

In this chapter, the author characterises the situation of Roma in the educational system of Sweden, focusing on achievements after year 2000 and on challenges for the…

Abstract

In this chapter, the author characterises the situation of Roma in the educational system of Sweden, focusing on achievements after year 2000 and on challenges for the future. A brief historical background is initially presented to frame the discussion, including the processes of getting access to the formal educational system, followed by an overview of the socioeconomic situation of Roma and a presentation of the recognition of Roma as a national minority in 2000 and the Strategy for Roma Inclusion 2012–2032. The second part of the chapter is focusing on the educational situation of Roma, more specifically on the years from 2000 until the present, also presenting a Roma example and findings from a study concerning higher education and the first course for Roma mediators working in schools. The conclusion discusses some of the achievements reached during recent years as well as challenges and priorities for the future of the Roma minority.

Details

Lifelong Learning and the Roma Minority in Western and Southern Europe
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-263-8

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Article
Publication date: 9 January 2009

Rebekka Vedina and Ilona Baumane

This paper aims to test assumptions made in previous research about the consequences of an identity threat in the construction of national identity among minority

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to test assumptions made in previous research about the consequences of an identity threat in the construction of national identity among minority populations in Latvia and to discover how their approach(es) to constructing national identity is (are) reflected in their attitudes and in organisations.

Design/methodology/approach

The study applies a survey method and uses the original scale for measuring collectivistic attitudes according to various target groups and the original scale for measuring organisational culture along its task and relationship orientation. It also draws on social identity theory, self‐categorization theory and segmented assimilation theories.

Findings

While the assumptions were not confirmed, it was found that the construction of national identity among minorities in Latvia does not follow the same path and that people with a mixed national identity have significantly lower collectivistic attitudes towards society. Yet, these attitudes are positively related to relationship orientation in organisations in all samples. We propose that while threats to identity have apparently diminished in Latvia in the last four years, the individual's approach to the formation of national identity still moderates his/her attachment to an organisation and support for organisational tasks.

Research limitations/implications

The reliability of one of the scales – collectivistic attitudes towards peers – was low in all samples. Future studies should categorize more specific target groups and look for differences in the corresponding collectivistic attitudes across various cultural and national identity groups.

Practical implications

Supporting good interpersonal relationships in organisations sustains patriotic feelings among all its members, including those with distinct approaches to constructing a national identity, and can strengthen the individual's orientation towards organisational tasks.

Originality/value

Research on the outcomes of demographic diversity in organisations approaches the issue of nationality as a uni‐dimensional construct. The present paper discloses the formation of national identity by uncovering other possible composites of national identity besides nationality. This paper provides insight for managers, academics and students into the role of the construction of national identity in revealing employee attachment to their organisation.

Details

Baltic Journal of Management, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5265

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Book part
Publication date: 30 September 2019

In this chapter, Milena Ivova Ilieva describes the Roma minority in the education system of Bulgaria, where – according to data from non-governmental organizations working…

Abstract

In this chapter, Milena Ivova Ilieva describes the Roma minority in the education system of Bulgaria, where – according to data from non-governmental organizations working directly with the Roma community – the number of Roma people varies between 8-10% of the total population. The situation of the Roma community is characterized by its marginal position in the society at different levels, which stands out more clearly against the process of globalization. Ilieva shows the disadvantages in social situation and presents a general overview of the classification of the Roma Community about educational integration. She analyses the official statistical data and gives reasons for the low education level of Roma in Bulgaria and describes the policy measures for Roma integration after 1989. She concludes that at this stage of their existence, the programs which the Bulgarian State is trying to apply with regard to Roma, are not effective and do not conform to the specifics of the Roma community.

Details

Lifelong Learning and the Roma Minority in Central and Eastern Europe
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-260-7

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Book part
Publication date: 6 June 2016

Abstract

Details

Social Conflict and Harmony: Tourism in China’s Multi-Ethnic Communities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-356-9

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2015

Tsai-Wei Sun

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of the Group Representation Constituency (GRC) system on the governance of Singapore, particularly in terms of equity…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of the Group Representation Constituency (GRC) system on the governance of Singapore, particularly in terms of equity and inclusiveness, accountability, and participation.

Design/methodology/approach

Historical review and election data from Singapore government web site are used.

Findings

The GRC system seems to be friendlier and fairer toward ethnic minorities than the traditional system. The GRC system also encourages political parties to be ethnically more inclusive. On the other hand, however, the GRC system has negative effects on opposition parties. A government cannot be called “accountable” if it lacks fair competition and sufficient popular participation.

Originality/value

The Singapore experience shows that, in practice, ethnic equality/inclusiveness and even political stability on the one hand, and participation and accountability on the other hand, can present conflicts. Which value should receive priority thus requires serious consideration.

Details

Asian Education and Development Studies, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-3162

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2010

Margaret Maurer‐Fazio, James W. Hughes and Dandan Zhang

The purpose of the paper is to examine observed differences in China's ethnic majority and minority patterns of labor force participation and to decompose these…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to examine observed differences in China's ethnic majority and minority patterns of labor force participation and to decompose these differences into treatment and endowment effects.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from the three most recent population censuses of China are employed to explore differences in the labor force participation rates of a number of China's important ethnic groups. Gender‐separated urban labor force participation rates are estimated using logit regressions, controlling for educational attainment, marital status, pre‐school and school‐age children, household size, age, and measures of local economic conditions. The focus is on the experience of six minority groups (Hui, Koreans, Manchu, Mongolians, Uygurs, and Zhuang) in comparison to the majority Han. The technique developed by Borooah and Iyer is adopted to decompose the differences in labor force participation rates between pairs of ethnic groups into treatment and endowment effects.

Findings

Sizeable differences are found between the labor force participation rates of prime‐age urban women of particular ethnic groups and the majority Han. Men's participation rates are very high (above 95 percent) and exhibit little difference between Han and ethnic minorities. For almost all pairwise comparisons between Han and ethnic women, it is found that differences in coefficients account for more than 100 percent of the Han‐ethnic difference in labor force participation. Differences in endowments often have substantial effects in reducing this positive Han margin in labor force participation. Roughly speaking, treatment of women's characteristics, whether in the market or socially, tend to increase the Han advantage in labor force participation. The levels of these characteristics on average tend to reduce this Han advantage.

Research limitations/implications

The paper analyses only one aspect of the economic status of China's ethnic minorities – labor force participation. It would be useful also to examine income, educational attainment, occupational attainment, and unemployment.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to and expands the scant literature on ethnicity in China's economic transition.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

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