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Book part
Publication date: 13 December 2013

Bertrand Candelon, Elena-Ivona Dumitrescu, Christophe Hurlin and Franz C. Palm

In this article we propose a multivariate dynamic probit model. Our model can be viewed as a nonlinear VAR model for the latent variables associated with correlated binary…

Abstract

In this article we propose a multivariate dynamic probit model. Our model can be viewed as a nonlinear VAR model for the latent variables associated with correlated binary time-series data. To estimate it, we implement an exact maximum likelihood approach, hence providing a solution to the problem generally encountered in the formulation of multivariate probit models. Our framework allows us to study the predictive relationships among the binary processes under analysis. Finally, an empirical study of three financial crises is conducted.

Details

VAR Models in Macroeconomics – New Developments and Applications: Essays in Honor of Christopher A. Sims
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-752-8

Keywords

Abstract

Details

VAR Models in Macroeconomics – New Developments and Applications: Essays in Honor of Christopher A. Sims
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-752-8

Book part
Publication date: 6 August 2014

Lorenzo Cappellari and Stephen P. Jenkins

We analyse the dynamics of social assistance benefit (SA) receipt among working-age adults in Britain between 1991 and 2005. The decline in the annual SA receipt rate was…

Abstract

We analyse the dynamics of social assistance benefit (SA) receipt among working-age adults in Britain between 1991 and 2005. The decline in the annual SA receipt rate was driven by a decline in the SA entry rate rather than by the SA exit rate (which also declined). We examine the determinants of these trends using a multivariate dynamic random effects probit model of SA receipt probabilities applied to British Household Panel Survey data. We show how the model may be used to derive year-by-year predictions of aggregate SA entry, exit and receipt rates. The analysis highlights the importance of the decline in the unemployment rate over the period and other changes in the socio-economic environment including two reforms to the income maintenance system in the 1990s and also illustrates the effects of self-selection (‘creaming’) on observed and unobserved characteristics.

Book part
Publication date: 6 August 2014

Kenneth Y. Chay and Dean R. Hyslop

We examine the roles of sample initial conditions and unobserved individual effects in consistent estimation of the dynamic binary response panel data model. Different…

Abstract

We examine the roles of sample initial conditions and unobserved individual effects in consistent estimation of the dynamic binary response panel data model. Different specifications of the model are estimated using female welfare and labor force participation data from the Survey of Income and Program Participation. These include alternative random effects (RE) models, in which the conditional distributions of both the unobserved heterogeneity and the initial conditions are specified, and fixed effects (FE) conditional logit models that make no assumptions on either distribution. There are several findings. First, the hypothesis that the sample initial conditions are exogenous is rejected by both samples. Misspecification of the initial conditions results in drastically overstated estimates of the state dependence and understated estimates of the short- and long-run effects of children on labor force participation. The FE conditional logit estimates are similar to the estimates from the RE model that is flexible with respect to both the initial conditions and the correlation between the unobserved heterogeneity and the covariates. For female labor force participation, there is evidence that fertility choices are correlated with both unobserved heterogeneity and pre-sample participation histories.

Article
Publication date: 7 March 2016

Marian Alexander Dietzel

Recent research has found significant relationships between internet search volume and real estate markets. This paper aims to examine whether Google search volume data…

Abstract

Purpose

Recent research has found significant relationships between internet search volume and real estate markets. This paper aims to examine whether Google search volume data can serve as a leading sentiment indicator and are able to predict turning points in the US housing market. One of the main objectives is to find a model based on internet search interest that generates reliable real-time forecasts.

Design/methodology/approach

Starting from seven individual real-estate-related Google search volume indices, a multivariate probit model is derived by following a selection procedure. The best model is then tested for its in- and out-of-sample forecasting ability.

Findings

The results show that the model predicts the direction of monthly price changes correctly, with over 89 per cent in-sample and just above 88 per cent in one to four-month out-of-sample forecasts. The out-of-sample tests demonstrate that although the Google model is not always accurate in terms of timing, the signals are always correct when it comes to foreseeing an upcoming turning point. Thus, as signals are generated up to six months early, it functions as a satisfactory and timely indicator of future house price changes.

Practical implications

The results suggest that Google data can serve as an early market indicator and that the application of this data set in binary forecasting models can produce useful predictions of changes in upward and downward movements of US house prices, as measured by the Case–Shiller 20-City House Price Index. This implies that real estate forecasters, economists and policymakers should consider incorporating this free and very current data set into their market forecasts or when performing plausibility checks for future investment decisions.

Originality/value

This is the first paper to apply Google search query data as a sentiment indicator in binary forecasting models to predict turning points in the housing market.

Details

International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2008

Ivan Jeliazkov, Jennifer Graves and Mark Kutzbach

In this paper, we consider the analysis of models for univariate and multivariate ordinal outcomes in the context of the latent variable inferential framework of Albert…

Abstract

In this paper, we consider the analysis of models for univariate and multivariate ordinal outcomes in the context of the latent variable inferential framework of Albert and Chib (1993). We review several alternative modeling and identification schemes and evaluate how each aids or hampers estimation by Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation methods. For each identification scheme we also discuss the question of model comparison by marginal likelihoods and Bayes factors. In addition, we develop a simulation-based framework for analyzing covariate effects that can provide interpretability of the results despite the nonlinearities in the model and the different identification restrictions that can be implemented. The methods are employed to analyze problems in labor economics (educational attainment), political economy (voter opinions), and health economics (consumers’ reliance on alternative sources of medical information).

Details

Bayesian Econometrics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-308-8

Book part
Publication date: 1 December 2016

Roman Liesenfeld, Jean-François Richard and Jan Vogler

We propose a generic algorithm for numerically accurate likelihood evaluation of a broad class of spatial models characterized by a high-dimensional latent Gaussian…

Abstract

We propose a generic algorithm for numerically accurate likelihood evaluation of a broad class of spatial models characterized by a high-dimensional latent Gaussian process and non-Gaussian response variables. The class of models under consideration includes specifications for discrete choices, event counts and limited-dependent variables (truncation, censoring, and sample selection) among others. Our algorithm relies upon a novel implementation of efficient importance sampling (EIS) specifically designed to exploit typical sparsity of high-dimensional spatial precision (or covariance) matrices. It is numerically very accurate and computationally feasible even for very high-dimensional latent processes. Thus, maximum likelihood (ML) estimation of high-dimensional non-Gaussian spatial models, hitherto considered to be computationally prohibitive, becomes feasible. We illustrate our approach with ML estimation of a spatial probit for US presidential voting decisions and spatial count data models (Poisson and Negbin) for firm location choices.

Details

Spatial Econometrics: Qualitative and Limited Dependent Variables
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-986-2

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 18 October 2019

Mohammad Arshad Rahman and Angela Vossmeyer

This chapter develops a framework for quantile regression in binary longitudinal data settings. A novel Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method is designed to fit the model

Abstract

This chapter develops a framework for quantile regression in binary longitudinal data settings. A novel Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method is designed to fit the model and its computational efficiency is demonstrated in a simulation study. The proposed approach is flexible in that it can account for common and individual-specific parameters, as well as multivariate heterogeneity associated with several covariates. The methodology is applied to study female labor force participation and home ownership in the United States. The results offer new insights at the various quantiles, which are of interest to policymakers and researchers alike.

Details

Topics in Identification, Limited Dependent Variables, Partial Observability, Experimentation, and Flexible Modeling: Part B
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-419-9

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Ho‐Chuan (River) Huang and Chung‐Hua Shen

This paper proposes a probit regression with autocorrelated errors (PAR) to estimate the reaction function of monetary policy in Taiwan using newly constructed binary…

Abstract

This paper proposes a probit regression with autocorrelated errors (PAR) to estimate the reaction function of monetary policy in Taiwan using newly constructed binary monetary indicators. We develop a practical sampling scheme via the Gibbs sampling algorithm with data augmentation to make posterior inference of the binary monetary policy reaction function. In contrast to the conventional approach, our method avoids the problem of multiple integrals by directly drawing values of latent variables from the relevant full conditional density along with all the other parameters. Empirical results show that the monetary authority responds to macroeconomic conditions asymmetrically. Specifically, in the high‐inflation regime, a contractionary monetary policy is implemented to reduce the inflation rate. Once inflation is under control, that is, in the low‐inflation regime, attention is paid to stimulating the growth of the economy.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 2 December 2021

Joaquín Prieto

The author proposes analyzing the dynamics of income positions using dynamic panel ordered probit models. The author disentangles, simultaneously, the roles of state…

Abstract

The author proposes analyzing the dynamics of income positions using dynamic panel ordered probit models. The author disentangles, simultaneously, the roles of state dependence and heterogeneity (observed and non-observed) in explaining income position persistence, such as poverty persistence and affluence persistence. The author applies the approach to Chile exploiting longitudinal data from the P-CASEN 2006–2009. First, the author finds that income position mobility at the bottom and the top of the income distribution is much higher than expected, showing signs that income mobility in the case of Chile might be connected to economic insecurity. Second, the observable individual characteristics have a much stronger impact than true state dependence to explain individuals’ current income position in the income distribution extremes.

Details

Research on Economic Inequality: Poverty, Inequality and Shocks
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-558-5

Keywords

1 – 10 of 382