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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2021

Asmahan Masry-Herzallah and Meital Amzalag

The research examined factors of academic studies as perceived by Jewish and Arab students in Israel, and changes in their implementation of activities in a multicultural…

Abstract

Purpose

The research examined factors of academic studies as perceived by Jewish and Arab students in Israel, and changes in their implementation of activities in a multicultural context in the field of education, comparing between undergraduates studying for a BA in education and graduate students for MA in education and attending a course titled “Multiculturalism in the Global Era”.

Design/methodology/approach

The findings are derived from a questionnaire distributed to Arab and Jewish students (N = 434), studying together in the Faculty of Education of one academic college in Israel. In total, 251 of them were graduate students, and 183 who were undergraduates.

Findings

It was found that insofar as the students from either programme acquired knowledge and tools regarding multiculturalism, they reported (1) more positive attitudes regarding the “Other” group and regarding multiculturalism, (2) implementation of a larger number of activities relating to multiculturalism in the field of education, (3) Arab students performed more activities in multicultural contexts and (4) older students performed a larger number of activities in multicultural contexts. The research findings also indicated a direct relation between participation in the course and activities conducted in the field of education. In addition, students' acquiring of knowledge on multiculturalism mediated the relation between participation in the course and implementation of multicultural activities in the field of education.

Originality/value

The research stresses the importance of higher education institutions in promoting knowledge and practice of multiculturalism in Israeli society.

Details

International Journal of Comparative Education and Development, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2396-7404

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2016

John Berry

The purpose of this paper is to describe and analyse two features of multicultural societies: diversity and equity. The author argues that both these features are…

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1472

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe and analyse two features of multicultural societies: diversity and equity. The author argues that both these features are necessary for multicultural societies and their institutions to be successful. Diversity is understood to include variations in culture, ethnicity, religion, age, gender and sexual orientation. Equity is understood to include inclusive participation and the removal of barriers to such participation. Diversity without the opportunity for equitable participation can lead to a form of separation; equity without diversity can lead to a form of assimilation; the absence of both can lead to marginalisation; and the presence of both can lead to a full integration.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a conceptual paper with a focus on better understanding of how to manage multicultural societies and institutions.

Findings

The author distinguishes between three meanings of multiculturalism; as demography; as policy; and as ideology. He proposes a conceptual framework to illustrate the various ways in which intercultural relations may take place at three levels (society, institutions and individual), and with two kinds of groups (dominant and non-dominant). An analysis of multiculturalism policy in Canada and internationally reveals three principles needed for success in such societies: the multiculturalism principle; the integration principle; and the contact principle.

Research limitations/implications

The use of these concepts for better management of intercultural relations in multicultural societies and institutions through mutual adaptation is proposed.

Originality/value

With much debate and confusion about the meaning and value of multiculturalism, this paper has sought to clarify many of the concepts and distinctions.

Details

Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5794

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Alberto G. Canen and Ana Canen

This article is an experiment carried out in a Brazilian higher education institution. It focusses on the participants’ perceptions and assumptions concerning…

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1706

Abstract

This article is an experiment carried out in a Brazilian higher education institution. It focusses on the participants’ perceptions and assumptions concerning multiculturalism before and after the exposure to a multicultural seminar, held during an international logistics module. It deals with the theoretical approach to logistics and multiculturalism, and its relevance in the contemporary world. It discusses the data gathered. It argues that a multicultural approach should be developed in organisations, pointing out that the handling of cultural differences seems to be one of the most relevant factors in the success or in the failure of companies in a globalised setting. It also contends that the university is a privileged arena for the development of this approach. Points are raised for a multicultural approach to logistics and management education.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

Bethany Bryson

Draws on interviews with 76 English professors in 4 US universities to document emerging definitions of multiculturalism and connect them to organizational conditions in…

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1437

Abstract

Draws on interviews with 76 English professors in 4 US universities to document emerging definitions of multiculturalism and connect them to organizational conditions in each department. Suggests that findings showed that the professors assigned meaning to the ambiguous and contested word, multiculturalism, according to the principles of organizational convenience rather than poligical conviction. Emphasizes the power of institutional routines for withstanding ideological challenges and illuminates the mechanisms through which resistance operates.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 22 no. 1/2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Book part
Publication date: 16 December 2016

Elizabeth A. Worden and Cynthia Miller-Idriss

Taking Moland’s article as a starting point, the chapter suggests that debates about “exporting” and “importing” concepts like multiculturalism need to be realigned with…

Abstract

Taking Moland’s article as a starting point, the chapter suggests that debates about “exporting” and “importing” concepts like multiculturalism need to be realigned with new theoretical and practical understandings of how identities work. We offer two primary categories of concerns. First, focusing on “exporting” multiculturalism inadvertently obscures complex intersectionalities between and among various identities, including ethnic and religious identities, gender and sexuality, and issue of power in state, local, and global North/South hierarchies. Second, multiculturalism’s focus on outcomes – in particular, achieving an appreciation for “other” cultures – is an outdated approach to addressing difference. Taken together, we argue that multiculturalism is an outmoded framework that does not map neatly onto the lived experience of identity or on how conflicts are resolved and is thus ineffective as a framework for conflict-prevention work. We suggest that research on reconciliation and conflict prevention instead could be situated in ways that view identities as porous, complex, contradictory, multiple, and varied. In this light, identities are messy rather than clear-cut; they can surge and retreat in relevance for individuals and communities at any given time, such that their value for an individual at any one point may not be easy to consciously articulate. Understanding identities in this way has implications for pedagogical interventions. Rather than pursuing interventions designed to promote an outcome of equal and celebratory acceptance of defined “others,” we call for interventions focused on process, thereby equipping individuals with the skills to continually work toward co-existence in communities where conflicts are marked by repeated fractures, tension, and messy identities.

Details

Annual Review of Comparative and International Education 2016
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-528-7

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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2021

Kathleen Park and Frederick Wallace

The purpose of this paper is to explore the influence and advantages of leadership multiculturalism on global strategy development through cross-border mergers and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the influence and advantages of leadership multiculturalism on global strategy development through cross-border mergers and acquisitions (CBA) and corporate social responsibility (CSR) from emerging market multinational companies (EMNCs) expanding into emerged markets. The key contribution of asymmetric multiculturalism is a novel finding based on inductive research. We fill a gap by further linking business leader characteristics and corporate strategic actions and examining how multicultural business leaders from emerging markets can be highly effective at CBA and CSR.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on in-depth interviews, observations and documentary evidence analyzed with iterative coding, construct definition and thematic development to understand how leadership multiculturalism affects CBA and CSR in an EMNC over time.

Findings

The new construct of leadership asymmetric multiculturalism describes strategic advantages accruing to leaders from developing markets who are culturally fluent in both emerging and emerged market milieus. The construct contributes to emergent research on the rise of multicultural leaders and their strategic advantages and delineates a pathway toward identifying advantages of emerging over emerged market business leaders.

Research limitations/implications

The research addresses specific CBA and CSR strategies within one emerging market region and EMNC. Future research should further articulate and validate the key construct of asymmetric multiculturalism, further examine its sources, draw more explicit comparisons with data from emerged market leaders, and explore the applicability of these findings to strategic actions and advantages in both emerging and emerged markets.

Practical implications

Emerging market corporate leaders should identify and develop pertinent aspects of their own asymmetric multiculturalism in enacting CBA and CSR strategy with respect to EMNCs and firms from developed markets. Emerged market leaders should become more aware of and cultivate their own multiculturalism.

Social implications

Asymmetric multiculturalism can be accompanied by heightened awareness of global citizenship — including codes of ethics, environmental challenges, community outreach and fair labor practices — which, in tandem with CBA, can strengthen emerging market firms’ performance and reinforce their global stature and reputation.

Originality/value

Asymmetric multiculturalism is a new explanatory construct in the sociological, economic and management disciplines. Emerging markets corporate leaders utilize their multicultural competence to accelerate global CBA and CSR activity and advance strategic opportunities for their firms. The identification of advantages deriving from emerging market leadership capabilities is an unusual finding given the more typical emphasis on the privileges of emerged market leaders and firms.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Heidi L. Hallman

This paper aims to explore the intersection of generational traits of millennial teachers, multiculturalism and teaching in an era of Uncertain Times. Uncertain Times, as…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the intersection of generational traits of millennial teachers, multiculturalism and teaching in an era of Uncertain Times. Uncertain Times, as a framework for the paper, characterizes changing aspects of the current era in which we live, such as the rise of the internet and interconnectivity, globalization and demographic diversity. The examination of millennial traits works to conceptualize how millennial teachers’ generational traits are always in a reciprocal relationship with Uncertain Times.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws upon life history (Cole and Knowles, 2001; Goodson and Sikes, 2001) and narrative methodologies (Bruner, 2002; Clandinin and Connelly, 2000; Mishler, 1990; Reissman, 2008) as methods appropriate for investigating how millennial teachers understand multicultural teaching in Uncertain Times. In presenting the analysis, a case-centered analysis with the aim of theorizing from the case (Stake, 1995) is pursued.

Findings

The paper highlights the complexity of millennial teachers’ openness to diversity and multiculturalism. Three themes are illuminated within the findings: the significance of millennial teachers’ generational ethos in their response to multiculturalism; a commitment to teaching “all students”; and teacher education’s role in re-framing multiculturalism in Uncertain Times.

Research limitations/implications

Millennial teachers may understand diversity and culture through internal processes (belief systems, inclusion, thoughts and feelings) and may also process how the external realities play a part in shaping understandings of diversity. Yet, it may be difficult for them to place the external and the internal in relationship to each other. The paradox that Castells (2010) articulates – of diversity as a uniting but also a dividing force – may be a site of struggle for millennial teachers.

Practical implications

The paper recommends that teacher educators and teacher education programs re-frame multiculturalism in relationship to Uncertain Times, thereby providing novice teachers with ways to nuance their understanding of and commitment to multicultural education today.

Social implications

Teacher educators and teacher education programs must work to prepare novice teachers for understanding the salience of diversity. This means going beyond an understanding of diversity and multiculturalism as merely honoring difference. Instead, it means placing these concepts in relation to the external context of Uncertain Times. This will assist novice teachers with recognizing the reciprocal relationship between one’s generational ethos and the external context in which one lives.

Originality/value

Throughout this paper, the external context in which teachers live and work is characterized through a framework of Uncertain Times, which depicts changing aspects of the current era in which we live. The following factors have been noted as significant: the rise of the internet and interconnectivity, globalization and demographic diversity. This paper considers how millennial teachers (those entering the teaching force today) consider the salience of multiculturalism in Uncertain Times.

Details

Journal for Multicultural Education, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-535X

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Abstract

Details

Organized Labor and Civil Society for Multiculturalism: A Solidarity Success Story from South Korea
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-388-6

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Book part
Publication date: 29 October 2003

Giuseppe Sciortino

In 1983, in typically Parisian manner, J. F. Lyotard claimed that redistributive conflict had gone out of fashion, with the focus of postmodern conflict revolving…

Abstract

In 1983, in typically Parisian manner, J. F. Lyotard claimed that redistributive conflict had gone out of fashion, with the focus of postmodern conflict revolving increasingly less around issues of resource allocation. Contemporary societies were having to deal with le différend, with horizontal conflicts rooted in heterogeneous languages, instances, and rules. The concern and claims of one group could not be understood within the languages of the other (Belohradski, 1990; Lyotard, 1983).

Details

Multicultural Challenge
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-064-7

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Article
Publication date: 4 February 2021

Ahmet Maslakcı, Harun Sesen and Lütfi Sürücü

Globalisation has made higher education increasingly multicultural. Although multicultural university students' attitudes and interactions with different cultures affect…

Abstract

Purpose

Globalisation has made higher education increasingly multicultural. Although multicultural university students' attitudes and interactions with different cultures affect their academic success as well as entrepreneurial intentions, only a few studies have analysed this topic. Therefore, this study examined the assumption that positive psychological capital (PsyCap) mediates the relationship between attitudes towards multiculturalism and entrepreneurial intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

A model was proposed and empirically tested 564 university students in Northern Cyprus. Data were analysed using SPSS 23 and AMOS 18 using the PROCESS Macro and Bootstrap methods.

Findings

The results indicated that improving university students' attitudes towards multiculturalism will have a beneficial effect on their entrepreneurial intentions. Moreover, PsyCap is a mediator variable on the relationship between multicultural attitudes and entrepreneurial intentions.

Research limitations/implications

This study contributes to the literature by theoretically and empirically examining how attitudes towards multiculturalism and PsyCap impact university students' entrepreneurial intentions. Its limitations can be overcome through future research.

Practical implications

The study's findings are valid in two areas: (1) assisting policymakers, researchers and academics to better understand the critical influence of university students' attitudes towards multiculturalism on their entrepreneurial intentions, particularly since this topic had not been extensively studied; (2) advancing theoretical discussions by examining the positive effects of internal factors such as PsyCap in terms of multicultural attitudes and entrepreneurial intentions.

Social implications

The study provides empirical evidence that academics and university administrators should pay attention to multicultural attitudes to increase university students' entrepreneurial intentions. Hence, it focused on the relationship between multicultural society, entrepreneurial intentions, and PsyCap.

Originality/value

Attitudes towards multiculturalism influence students' entrepreneurial intentions through PsyCap. The context of cultural values and multiculturalism determines the premises of entrepreneurial intentions. This study is unique and innovative as it brings a new focus to academic literature.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 63 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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