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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

Daniel J. O’Neil

This article explores the negative ramifications of pursuing a policy of multi‐culturalism. It suggests that such a policy is foreign to the western philosophical…

Abstract

This article explores the negative ramifications of pursuing a policy of multi‐culturalism. It suggests that such a policy is foreign to the western philosophical tradition. It argues that the merits of multi‐culturalism are assumed rather than demonstrated. It questions whether multi‐culturalism is reconcilable with democracy, systemic maintenance and stability, and economic viability. Focusing on the USA it defends the traditional melting pot/assimilationist policy toward cultural variety.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 22 July 2009

Carla Moleiro, Ana Silva, Rute Rodrigues and Vera Borges

The paper addresses diversity, multi‐culturalism and mental health. It reports qualitative data from a larger project on multi‐cultural counselling competencies in…

Abstract

The paper addresses diversity, multi‐culturalism and mental health. It reports qualitative data from a larger project on multi‐cultural counselling competencies in Portugal which sought to meet the needs identified by specific minority groups by developing integrative, responsive and culturally sensitive treatments. A qualitative study is presented, with the aim of exploring the representations of mental health and illness held by ethnic minority groups in Portugal, as well as their specific needs and obstacles encountered in their interactions with health professionals. Semi‐structured interviews were conducted, and the results indicate that the meanings of health and mental health varied. Meanings of psychological health were related to general well‐being. Help‐seeking behaviours were associated with providing and receiving family and social support, mainly among participants of African descent. Although the great majority of participants had had no experience of counselling or psychotherapy, they expected psychologists to be multiculturally sensitive, as well as knowledgeable about diversity and multi‐culturalism. Implications for development of mental health services for minority clients are discussed.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

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Expert briefing
Publication date: 6 October 2015

A rift has opened between the eleven former communist EU member states (EU-11), and such older members as Germany and Sweden, over attitudes towards immigrants and…

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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2016

Jorunn Marie Dale and Mohammed Dulaimi

This research aim is to investigate the impact of cultural competence on the ability of project managers to lead international development projects successfully.

Abstract

Purpose

This research aim is to investigate the impact of cultural competence on the ability of project managers to lead international development projects successfully.

Design/methodology/approach

An empirical qualitative research was applied and a case study approach was chosen. In this case, the researcher followed an international project manager amongst the Maasai people in Kenya for six weeks. In addition to field observations, this study conducted 12 in-debt interviews and arranged several informal focus groups to discuss observed issues cross culturally.

Findings

Findings indicate that the cultural competence supports a process that might increase the awareness and knowledge of contextual factors that can improve the project managers’ ability to establish relationships, communicate and approach challenges and opportunities more effectively.

Originality/value

There is very little research on the issue of multi-culturalism in the non-government development project environment. The outcome of this research is expected to stimulate further interest in the subject and encourage far-reaching research, which can provide a reliable future guide for PM´s and other decision makers in international non-government development projects.

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1994

Nicola Matthews and Vincent Roper

Examines briefly provision for ethnic minority groups and the extent towhich they are catered for by the public library service. This includesa look at the library′s role…

Abstract

Examines briefly provision for ethnic minority groups and the extent to which they are catered for by the public library service. This includes a look at the library′s role in creating a multicultural and multiracial society, with examples of libraries which are currently attempting to integrate ethnic minorities into the service. Legislation, policy statements and surveys that have been carried out are examined for their relevance to current provision. Also examines the contentious issue of “Section 11” funding, both in the original form and with the new criteria, why it was originally introduced and the problems that were created, followed by a look at the new criteria and some of the effects on the public library service. Problems encountered with the new criteria are examined as are the reasons why some authorities were more successful than others in bidding for funds. The conclusions drawn are to the mixed reactions that the new “Section 11” criteria have provoked, and the great challenges the library service faces to integrate ethnic minority provision into the mainstream of public library services.

Details

Library Management, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2010

Michael Dickmann and Tim Mills

Research neglects the role that specific locations play in the decision process to accept international work. This paper aims to explore the career drivers of individuals…

Abstract

Purpose

Research neglects the role that specific locations play in the decision process to accept international work. This paper aims to explore the career drivers of individuals working as expatriates in London (UK) and to focus on the relationships with specific location attributes.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 11 qualitative in‐depth interviews and 348 quantitative questionnaire responses are used to explore the importance of intelligent career considerations for working as an expatriate in London.

Findings

A range of location‐specific factors and intelligent career considerations is identified and quantitatively assessed. The study depicts the links of perceived career factors and location‐specific drivers.

Originality/value

Applying the intelligent careers framework, the research goes beyond the normally used broad national factors to explore career capital drivers that motivate individuals to go to a specific city location. In exploring the relatively neglected areas of knowing‐whom and knowing‐why it sheds light on international relocation decision making. These insights inform further academic research and help to shape expatriation policies and practices of organizations.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 39 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

Bethany Bryson

Draws on interviews with 76 English professors in 4 US universities to document emerging definitions of multiculturalism and connect them to organizational conditions in…

Abstract

Draws on interviews with 76 English professors in 4 US universities to document emerging definitions of multiculturalism and connect them to organizational conditions in each department. Suggests that findings showed that the professors assigned meaning to the ambiguous and contested word, multiculturalism, according to the principles of organizational convenience rather than poligical conviction. Emphasizes the power of institutional routines for withstanding ideological challenges and illuminates the mechanisms through which resistance operates.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 22 no. 1/2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2020

Xinran Lehto, Dori Davari and Soona Park

This study aims to provide a fresh perspective toward understanding the forces that exist in the guest-host dynamic and thereby contribute to the guest–host relationship…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to provide a fresh perspective toward understanding the forces that exist in the guest-host dynamic and thereby contribute to the guest–host relationship literature.

Design/methodology/approach

This study examines guest–host relationship via the philosophical lens of convivialism.

Findings

This study conceptualizes conviviality in the guest–host relationship. A convivial guest–host relationship is characterized by well-being mutuality and hospitality mutuality. Such a relation can be built when the guest and the host form a tri-party of coalitions, namely, economic, experience and hospitality. While an economic coalition represents the pragmatic value in a guest–host relationship, an experience coalition represents an experiential value in a guest–host relationship. A hospitality coalition then represents the spiritual alliance in such a relationship.

Practical implications

This paper suggests that tourism development should be guided by a conviviality vision. Health and well-being of both the visitors and the destination community should be a goal priority. This paper suggests that the starting point of experience planning is the residents, not the visitors. The critical role of hospitality in formulating market communication strategies is emphasized.

Social implications

This study contributes to the larger conversation of diversity and sustainability.

Originality/value

This study proposes a convivial tourism model – a form of tourism that is oriented toward mutuality of hospitality and well-being of both visitors and destination communities.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2012

Michael Dickmann

The literature has hitherto neglected the influence of specific cities on the decision to work abroad, implicitly treating all locations within countries as similar. Using…

Abstract

Purpose

The literature has hitherto neglected the influence of specific cities on the decision to work abroad, implicitly treating all locations within countries as similar. Using a boundaryless careers and expatriation perspective, the purpose of this paper is to investigate a range of specific motives that individuals have when working in London, the British capital.

Design/methodology/approach

The results of semi‐structured, in‐depth interviews and a large‐scale quantitative survey shed light on the relative importance of individual drives, career and development motivations, family and partner factors, organizational context, national and city‐specific considerations to come to London.

Findings

A range of London‐specific attributes are identified and their importance assessed. A new framework of individual international mobility drivers is developed.

Research limitations/implications

There is limited generalisability of findings of interview studies, especially as “white collar” workers and managers were interviewed. Theoretical contributions consist of the development of a framework for city attractiveness assessment and further insights into international mobility drivers and barriers.

Practical implications

The findings reiterate the importance of individual preparation of international sojourns based on proactive location choice. They also inform city policy considerations and organizational strategies, policies and practices with respect to international mobility.

Originality/value

The paper moves the literature on new international careers and global mobility to go beyond the organizational perspective to assess city attractiveness factors. The paper develops a framework for evaluating city attractiveness and assesses London's “pull factors”. This results in major implications for public policy, organizational resourcing and individual decision making.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 31 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 22 July 2009

Manuel García‐Ramirez and Eleni Hatzidimitriadou

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

1 – 10 of 155