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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2016

Rexford Abaidoo

This paper aims to augment existing literature by examining how specific macroeconomic conditions (economic policy uncertainty and inflation expectations) influence…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to augment existing literature by examining how specific macroeconomic conditions (economic policy uncertainty and inflation expectations) influence micro-level (instead of macro-level) behavioral dynamics exhibited by the average consumer.

Design/methodology/approach

This study conducted empirical analysis using structural vector autoregressive estimation technique.

Findings

The average consumer tends to exhibit significantly varied micro-level expenditure behavioral patterns not readily observed at the macro- or aggregate-level expenditures. For instance, this study finds that in the short run, inflation expectations tend to have a significant positive impact on both non-durable goods and service expenditures; the same condition, however, tends to have a negative impact on durable goods. Additionally, this study also finds that economic policy uncertainty, unlike inflation expectations, tends to constrain consumption expenditures at all micro levels with very significant variations in decline in expenditures made.

Originality/value

Unlike legion of empirical work based on macro-level analysis, this study adopts a micro-level analysis and also engages two macroeconomic conditions (inflation expectations and economic policy uncertainty) not already examined in existing studies.

Details

Journal of Financial Economic Policy, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-6385

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Article
Publication date: 27 January 2021

Mei Peng Low and Heath Spong

This research aims to examines the impact of micro-level corporate social responsibility (CSR) practices on employee engagement within the public accounting firm setting.

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to examines the impact of micro-level corporate social responsibility (CSR) practices on employee engagement within the public accounting firm setting.

Design/methodology/approach

This research uses a quantitative approach with a survey instrument as the data collection tool. A total of 269 complete responses were collected from employees working in the public accounting firms. Micro-level CSR practices were analysed with a hierarchical component model (HCM) in partial least square structural equation modelling (PLS-SEM) to examine the influence of such practices on employee engagement. A predictive performance metric was applied to assess the out-of-sample prediction.

Findings

This study uncovers a positive and significant relationship between micro-level CSR practices and employee engagement. Furthermore, the PLSpredict results indicate that the current model possesses high predictive power with all indicators in the PLS-SEM analysis demonstrating lower root mean squared error (RMSE) values compared to the naïve linear regression model benchmark.

Research limitations/implications

While the methods applied in this analysis are at the frontier of CSR research, the present study has not explored the heterogeneity amongst groups of respondents and size of accounting firms. Sampling weight adjustment for the purposes of representativeness was not used in the current research. These could be the subject of future work in this area.

Practical implications

These research findings shed light on the positive manifestation effect of micro-level CSR practices at firm level as well as individual level. Through micro-level CSR practices, firms can reap the benefits of enhanced employee engagement, which leads to productive workforce while also facilitating increased employees’ intrinsic job satisfaction.

Social implications

Micro-level CSR practices address the needs of the millennium workforce, whereby employees are no longer solely focussed on pay checks as their compensation. Employees are seeking out employers whose CSR practices appeal to their social conscience. Micro-level CSR practices meet the needs of the contemporary workforce yet enable companies to attract and retain skilled employees.

Originality/value

The originality of this research is attributed to the vigorous statistical analysis by the use of HCMs and PLSpredict in PLS-SEM context for the assessment of predictive performance. Also, micro-level CSR practices are conceptualised in HCM for parsimonious purpose.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2012

Anneli Hujala and Sari Rissanen

The aim of the paper is to understand and define how the polyphony of management is constructed in interaction and to describe this through concrete management meeting…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the paper is to understand and define how the polyphony of management is constructed in interaction and to describe this through concrete management meeting cases. Polyphony refers to the diverse voices of various organization members, and how these voices are present, disclosed and utilized in management.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on the social constructionist and discursive perspectives of management, which question the traditional, individualistic approaches of management. The issue was examined through a qualitative case study by analysing the micro‐level management discourse in three healthcare organizations.

Findings

Discursive practices that enhance or inhibit polyphony are often unnoticed and unconscious. Key moments of management discourse are an example of unconscious mundane practices through which members of organizations construct the reality of management.

Research limitations/implications

The empirical results are locally contextual. In the future, research will be able to apply the approach to diverse contexts as well as link micro‐level discourses to the construction of broader health and social management discourses.

Practical implications

The paper increases the understanding of how to enhance participation and staff contribution, and how to utilize the knowledge of all members of the organization.

Social implications

Both managers and other staff members are fully involved in the social construction of management. Micro‐level discourse should be paid attention to in management work as well as in the education of managers and staff.

Originality/value

The study increases the understanding of micro‐level issues of management and challenges the conventional, taken‐for‐granted assumptions behind organization and management theories.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2015

Judith K. Pringle and Irene Ryan

– The purpose of this paper is to operationalize context in diversity management research.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to operationalize context in diversity management research.

Design/methodology/approach

A case analysis provides an example of the influences of context at macro, meso and micro levels. Country context (macro) and professional and organization contexts (meso) are analysed in relation to the micro individual experiences of gender and indigeneity at work.

Findings

Tensions and inconsistencies at macro and meso levels impact on diversity management at a micro level. The authors demonstrate how power and context are intertwined in the biopolitical positioning of subjects in terms of gender and indigeneity. The contested legacy of indigenous-colonial relations and societal gender dynamics are “played out” in a case from the accounting profession.

Research limitations/implications

Within critical diversity studies context and power are linked in a reciprocal relationship; analysis of both is mandatory to strengthen theory and practice. The multi-level analytical framework provides a useful tool to understand advances and lack of progress for diversity groups within specific organizations.

Originality/value

While many diversity scholars agree that the analysis of context is important, hitherto its application has been vague. The authors conduct a multi-level analysis of context, connecting the power dynamics between the levels. The authors draw out implications within one profession in a specific country socio-politics. Multi-level analyses of context and power have the potential to enhance the theory and practice of diversity management.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 34 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 31 October 2008

Pierre Berthon, Leyland Pitt, Dianne Cyr and Colin Campbell

The paper's aim is to create a framework for national readiness and receptivity to e‐commerce at both the business to business (B2B) as well as business to consumer (B2C) levels.

Abstract

Purpose

The paper's aim is to create a framework for national readiness and receptivity to e‐commerce at both the business to business (B2B) as well as business to consumer (B2C) levels.

Design/methodology/approach

Relevant literature on e‐readiness is discussed in light of research on corruption and national values. A model is formulated at the macro level in which e‐readiness is predicted to be related to national culture values and corruption. Analysis at the micro level rests on existing literature related to trust and web site usability.

Findings

At the macro level of analysis, levels of perceived corruption within a country, and overarching national values are identified as significant contributors to e‐readiness especially in the B2B realm. At a more micro level, it is proposed that individual expectations regarding ability to trust an online vendor, and the suitability of usability characteristics of web site design contribute to e‐readiness at the B2C level. Taken together, macro and macro factors jointly contribute to a nation's readiness and receptivity to e‐commerce.

Research limitations/implications

The empirical work presented is based on aggregate level data from only one point in time. Results only provide generalized trends that may not be representative of all firms in a country or still applicable in the present time.

Practical implications

Practitioners are challenged to think beyond technological readiness and address factors such as corruption, national culture, and web design before entering new markets.

Originality/value

This paper identifies aspects of e‐readiness beyond purely technical infrastructure and provides a fresh empirical model. This study uniquely considers both micro and macro level characteristics that contribute to e‐readiness.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2010

Bernd Carsten Stahl, Neil McBride and Ibrahim Elbeltagi

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the emancipatory promises and realities of information and communication technology (ICT) in Egypt.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the emancipatory promises and realities of information and communication technology (ICT) in Egypt.

Design/methodology/approach

The combination of Habermasian and Foucauldian ideas implemented by a critical discourse analysis of the Egyptian Information Society Policy and interviews with employees of local decision support systems employees. Promises and rhetoric are contrasted with findings and questioned with regards to their validity.

Findings

On the policy level, analysis shows that the emancipating rhetoric of ICT is not followed through. ICT is mostly seen as a means of attracting foreign direct investment. Neither political participation nor educational benefits are promoted seriously. On the local level, culture and organisational realities prevent individuals from exploiting the emancipatory potential of the technology.

Originality/value

The combination of the Habermasian and Foucauldian approach exposes the problems of ICT use in developing countries. It shows that emancipation is used to legitimise ICT policies but is not taken seriously on a policy level in Egypt. Local implementations also fail to deliver on their promise. In order to have emancipatory effects, ICT policy and use will need to be reconsidered.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 30 March 2020

Elaine Yerby and Rebecca Page-Tickell

This chapter draws together the main themes and conclusions from the book to provide an interdisciplinary analysis of the impacts of the gig economy. The effectiveness of…

Abstract

This chapter draws together the main themes and conclusions from the book to provide an interdisciplinary analysis of the impacts of the gig economy. The effectiveness of the dynamic structural model of the gig economy for structuring and understanding of this heterogenous and somewhat hidden economy is also addressed. This chapter identifies the primary locations in which boundaries are shifting and suggests the onward impact of this, as well as ways in which organisations may be able to ameliorate the effects. It focusses in particular on the implications for the human resource management community and key stakeholders in the wider economy, in relation to future of work debates. Reflections on the utility, benefits and opportunities for interdisciplinary research within the current constrain of journal rankings and higher education performance regimes are also explored. Finally, a number of potential avenues for further research to advance our understanding of, and engagement with this form of commerce, are identified.

Details

Conflict and Shifting Boundaries in the Gig Economy: An Interdisciplinary Analysis
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-604-9

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Article
Publication date: 28 May 2020

Anna Gerke, Herbert Woratschek and Geoff Dickson

There are different streams of research in the service marketing literature concerning value co-creation. Most of the research focuses on value co-creation for the benefit…

Abstract

Purpose

There are different streams of research in the service marketing literature concerning value co-creation. Most of the research focuses on value co-creation for the benefit of the customer. However, value is also co-created for the benefit of the provider, especially in a business-to-business context. The purpose of this research is to understand (1) how value is co-created in a sport business-to-business context (i.e. sailing) and (2) how the prevailing value co-creation approaches explain value co-creation processes differently in a sport business-to-business context.

Design/methodology/approach

The research was contextualised within the Auckland sailing cluster. Primary data were collected via 27 interviews, as well as observations at events. Secondary data include 13 documents of organisational information and archival data. Data were analysed deductively and interpreted using two different theoretical lenses: service-dominant logic (SDL) and service logic (SL).

Findings

The value co-creation analysis of the sailing cluster permitted theorising about relationships in sport management at different levels of aggregation and abstraction. Every actor is embedded in a wider sport eco-system triggered by sport activities and always has a dual role as provider and beneficiary. Actors that are in control of specific sport activities are pivotal actors and provide a value network for others.

Research limitations/implications

This research suggests that SDL and SL approaches to value co-creation are complementary and that further research is necessary to integrate and operationalise these approaches.

Practical implications

It helps practitioners to better understand how value is co-created in sport business-to-business contexts.

Originality/value

This research shows the complementarity of two differing theoretical approaches to explain value co-creation in sport business-to-business settings.

Details

Sport, Business and Management: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-678X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 17 July 2009

Mark A. Papworth, Derek Milne and George Boak

Hersey and Blanchard's situational leadership (SL) model is widely utilised, but it has limited empirical support. This paper aims to investigate the model through content…

Abstract

Purpose

Hersey and Blanchard's situational leadership (SL) model is widely utilised, but it has limited empirical support. This paper aims to investigate the model through content analysis of the transcripts of supervision sessions.

Design/methodology/approach

Eight transcripts of successful supervision interviews are subjected to in‐depth content analysis to investigate the validity of aspects of the SL model, principally that successful leadership interactions would vary systematically according to the level of supervisee experience. The supervisees consist of a novice, four training therapists, and three post‐graduate therapist practitioners. Statistical analyses are undertaken to investigate fundamental, predicted differences between the speech behaviours associated with the different developmental levels of these supervisees.

Findings

The findings offer only partial support for the model. As predicted, an increased proportion of supervisor speech is observed in the supervision of increasingly less experienced therapists. However, the majority of the more specific speech behaviours associated with supervisee experience level are not in keeping with the model.

Originality/value

These results are consistent with the findings of other evaluations of the SL model. As the present results are based on a novel approach, this increases the plausibility of the claim that SL lacks adequate empirical support. Areas of development and exploration are recommended, and limits associated with the model's utility are highlighted.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 28 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Simone Mack and Lukas Goretzki

This paper aims to examine how remote (i.e. global, regional or divisional) management accountants communicate in interpersonal contacts with operational managers when…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine how remote (i.e. global, regional or divisional) management accountants communicate in interpersonal contacts with operational managers when trying to exert influence on them.

Design/methodology/approach

An ethnographic field study focusing on budgetary control meetings between regional management accountants and operational managers is used as the basis for a micro-level analysis of situated face-to-face interactions and communicative influence tactics.

Findings

Remote management accountants mainly use soft rather than hard influence tactics. They, furthermore, employ what is referred to as “panoramic knowledge” gained explicitly from their structurally as well as physically removed “meta-positioning” to suggest certain measures to operational managers that have proved successful in other units and – by doing so – try to exert influence on these managers. Moreover, they use information that they gain in their position in between senior and operational managers by acting as “double agents” – that is, informing operational managers about senior managers’ focus as well as making transparent to operational managers that they will inform senior management about specific operational matters. By doing so, they try to prompt operational managers to address these issues. Additionally, strengthening their verbally articulated suggestions, as “minute takers” they are able to document their suggestions by moving from spoken to a more binding written text. Through these purposeful and rather unobtrusive tactics, remote management accountants try to take influence on operational managers without generating their resistance.

Originality/value

The paper shows how remote management accountants (as staff members) can skillfully turn their apparently powerless position within the organization into a source of strength to exert influence on operational managers.

Details

Qualitative Research in Accounting & Management, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1176-6093

Keywords

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