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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

David Lal, Douglas C. Pitt and Ahmed Beloucif

The past 20 years have seen the worldwide telecommunications industry transformed from predominantly dormant, country‐centred, government‐run agencies, to increasingly…

Abstract

The past 20 years have seen the worldwide telecommunications industry transformed from predominantly dormant, country‐centred, government‐run agencies, to increasingly competitive, innovative and market‐led organisations. Much of the will to change has stemmed from the visionary market liberalisation and deregulation policies of the US and UK governments. Indeed, such determined change has brought with it creative and vibrant strategic positioning and repositioning of firms within the evolving global telecommunications marketplace. As a result, in pushing forward the frontiers of knowledge within this rapidly changing environment, the main focus of this study examines and analyses secondary literature and considers the key dynamic factors driving structural change within the European telecommunications market. To this end, a theoretical model of their respective impact on market structure is generated.

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European Business Review, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2017

Liang Wang

The purpose of this paper is to theorize how the industry life cycle unfolds differently across places and how economic agglomeration varies over time.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to theorize how the industry life cycle unfolds differently across places and how economic agglomeration varies over time.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper relies on literature review and conceptual analysis.

Findings

It generates a dynamic geographic concentration model (i.e. an industry’s degree of geographic concentration drops in the growth stage, rises in the mature stage, and drops again in the new growth stage) and a localized industry life-cycle model (i.e. temporal dynamics differ between the center and the periphery).

Originality/value

It makes contribution by theorizing that the extent to which an industry is geographically concentrated changes over time, and by demonstrating how an industry’s center and periphery may experience different temporal dynamics.

Details

Journal of Strategy and Management, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-425X

Keywords

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Expert briefing
Publication date: 16 November 2016

Outlook for India's telecoms sector.

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-DB216010

ISSN: 2633-304X

Keywords

Geographic
Topical
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Book part
Publication date: 14 December 2004

Anita M. McGahan, Nicholas Argyres and Joel A.C. Baum

The central organizing principle for this volume – the industry life cycle model – is so widely accepted and its basic premises so taken for granted that it has become…

Abstract

The central organizing principle for this volume – the industry life cycle model – is so widely accepted and its basic premises so taken for granted that it has become conventional wisdom in business. Executives in a range of industries use the model to guide their thinking about when and how to invest in various industries. Diversification decisions, for example, are often made on the basis of life cycle logic, especially as large, established companies seek high-growth opportunities for investment.

Details

Business Strategy over the Industry Lifecycle
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-135-4

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Book part
Publication date: 5 February 2016

Irwin Feller

Since at least the 1970s, the American research university system has experienced episodic periods of austerity, frequently accompanied by expressions of concern about the…

Abstract

Since at least the 1970s, the American research university system has experienced episodic periods of austerity, frequently accompanied by expressions of concern about the threats that these conditions pose to U.S. scientific and technological leadership. In general, austerity has been tied to fluctuations in Federal Government funding of academic research and macroeconomic fluctuations that have shrunk state government budget revenues. Even amidst these episodes, the system has continued to expand and decentralize. The issue at present is whether this historic resiliency, of being a marvelous invalid, will overcome adverse contemporary trends in Federal and state government funding, as well as political trends that eat away at the societal bonds between universities and their broader publics. The paper juxtaposes examinations of the organizational and political influences that have given rise to the American research university system, trends in research revenues and research costs, and contemporary efforts by universities to balance the two. It singles out the secular decline in state government’s support of public universities as the principal reason why this period of contraction is different from those of the past. Rather though then these trends portending a market shakeout, as some at times have predicted, the projection here is that the academic research system will continue to be characterized by excess capacity and recurrent downward pressures on research costs. Because the adverse impacts are concentrated in the public university sector, they may also spill over into political threats to the current system of awarding academic research grants primarily via competitive, merit review arrangements.

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The University Under Pressure
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-831-5

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Andrew J. Rohm, Vishal Kashyap, Thomas G. Brashear and George R. Milne

The promise of B2B e‐commerce had led to an explosion in the number of e‐marketplaces as firms adopted a “launch and learn” strategy. However a cash crisis and continuing…

Abstract

The promise of B2B e‐commerce had led to an explosion in the number of e‐marketplaces as firms adopted a “launch and learn” strategy. However a cash crisis and continuing losses led to tremendous consolidation in these marketplaces. This scenario was mirrored in Latin America too. With the growing importance of B2B e‐commerce worldwide, Latin American firms cannot ignore the competitive advantages that accrue by employing the Internet into their strategies. This paper presents a variety of decision models that small and medium enterprises can employ to integrate the Internet into their business decisions and thereby remain competitive.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 19 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1980

Charles W. Hofer

No matter what the state of the economy, no company is immune from internal hard times—stagnation or declining performance. How can management pinpoint the right…

Abstract

No matter what the state of the economy, no company is immune from internal hard times—stagnation or declining performance. How can management pinpoint the right turnaround strategy when it is needed—and make it work?

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Content available
Article
Publication date: 6 June 2016

Ashley D. Lloyd, Mario Antonioletti and Terence M. Sloan

China is the world’s largest user market for digital technologies and experiencing unprecedented rates of rural-urban migration set to create the world’s first “urban…

Abstract

Purpose

China is the world’s largest user market for digital technologies and experiencing unprecedented rates of rural-urban migration set to create the world’s first “urban billion”. This is an important context for studying nuanced adoption behaviours that define a digital divide. Large-scale studies are required to determine what behaviours exist in such populations, but can offer limited ability to draw inferences about why. The purpose of this paper is to report a large-scale study inside China that probes a nuanced “digital divide” behaviour: consumer demographics indicating ability to pay by electronic means but behaviour suggesting lack of willingness to do so, and extends current demographics to help explain this.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors report trans-national access to commercial “Big Data” inside China capturing the demographics and consumption of millions of consumers across a wide range of physical and digital market channels. Focusing on one urban location we combine traditional demographics with a new measure that reflecting migration: “Distance from Home”, and use data-mining techniques to develop a model that predicts use behaviour.

Findings

Use behaviour is predictable. Most use is explained by value of the transaction. “Distance from Home” is more predictive of technology use than traditional demographics.

Research limitations/implications

Results suggest traditional demographics are insufficient to explain “why” use/non-use occurs and hence an insufficient basis to formulate and target government policy.

Originality/value

The authors understand this to be the first large-scale trans-national study of use/non-use of digital channels within China, and the first study of the impact of distance on ICT adoption.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1991

Martin White

Anyone speaking about the information industry faces two major obstacles in analysing events, developments and trends. First, there is no widely accepted definition of…

Abstract

Anyone speaking about the information industry faces two major obstacles in analysing events, developments and trends. First, there is no widely accepted definition of what constitutes the information industry. Second, the information industry, especially in Europe, is so fiercely secretive about any aspect of its commercial operations that no matter what definition one takes, basic data on market size and growth, and on company performance, is so sparse as to be a cause for grave concern.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 43 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1985

Sylvia Kaufman

A blurring of distinctions among stores and consumers in a changing market‐place has broad ramifications for retailers, manufacturers, and wholesalers. In this paper we…

Abstract

A blurring of distinctions among stores and consumers in a changing market‐place has broad ramifications for retailers, manufacturers, and wholesalers. In this paper we will first examine how stores are becoming alike, using a strategic tool to identify problems and anticipate competitive response. Second, we will see how several retail leaders have not fallen into a mold but have been able to differentiate, diversify, and grow. Next, we will consider the implications of the wholesale/warehouse club as a new stage in the evolution of retailing and wholesaling. Finally, we will examine manufacturers' concerns in coping with rapid retail evolution.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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