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Article

Ray Bromley

Provide a general contemporary overview of street vending around the world, focusing on the major issues underlying its permanence as a phenomenon, and the ambivalent…

Abstract

Provide a general contemporary overview of street vending around the world, focusing on the major issues underlying its permanence as a phenomenon, and the ambivalent attitudes displayed towards it by governments and off‐street business communities. Focuses on street vendors as an occupational group ad includes arguments for and against their existence, the impact of their geographical and economic location, and role of the government.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 20 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Book part

Chimaobi Okere

From the heaps of garbage in street corners and highways, to blocked drains and obstructed waterways, Nigerian cities continue to bear marks of environmental degradation…

Abstract

From the heaps of garbage in street corners and highways, to blocked drains and obstructed waterways, Nigerian cities continue to bear marks of environmental degradation occasioned by the business activities of manufacturers. Globally, the picture is no less different as landfills, oceans and beaches bear indubitable testimonies of plastic pollution. While the manufacturers smile to the bank, governments and municipal authorities struggle with their meagre resources to combat the colossal burden of plastic pollution they generated in the course of creating wealth. The use of non-biodegradable materials such as polythene in product packaging is the primary driver of manufacturing-induced environmental degradation in Nigerian cities and other cities of the world. Recent developments in commerce in Nigeria, such as the emergence of the mobile supermarket, are responsible for the geometric increase in street filthiness in the country. Developing strategic alliances amongst Nigerian manufacturers or between manufacturers and municipal authorities is key in ensuring a healthy environment while doing business. However, such alliances must take a clue from the Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) embodied in the environmental consciousness practised in local markets in Nigeria, hereafter referred to as the ‘market-place model’ for environmental stewardship. This model, when replicated in other economies across the globe, would significantly reduce the global burden of plastic wastes and the hazards they pose in the environment. Conscience repayment, provision of refuse collection points, recycling and green packaging are part of ways of operationalising this model in everyday business. Adopting the market-place model in building strategic alliances for environmental stewardship would afford Nigerian manufacturers, and indeed global manufacturers, financial and non-financial business benefits such as cost savings through eco-efficiency, enlightened self-interest and good corporate image.

Details

Stakeholders, Governance and Responsibility
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-380-3

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Article

Fodei M. Conteh and Derya Oktay

With increasing urbanisation in developing countries and the concomitant overcrowding on streets, serious questions remain about the liveability of inner-city…

Abstract

With increasing urbanisation in developing countries and the concomitant overcrowding on streets, serious questions remain about the liveability of inner-city residential-commercial streets. This paper contends that lively streets are not necessarily liveable streets. Liveability is defined by other criteria that take cognizance of human comfort and capabilities within living environments. Observations suggest an uneasy relationship between a crowded public space and the private residential spaces that sit next to them. The paper’s focus is to measure the liveability of a lively but overcrowded street and how its everyday use affects the physical characteristics of buildings, the activities, and the wellbeing of residents. Employing a mixed-method strategy, the study draws on observations, semi-structured interviews, and questionnaire survey of residents, shopkeepers, and street traders. The findings suggest that an overcrowded street space has a negative effect on the liveability and quality of living of residents and other users but that this is tempered by intra-dependency amongst the users and the negotiation of the rights accruing to all as individuals and as groups.

Details

Open House International, vol. 41 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Article

Yasmine Sabry Hegazi and Mohanad Fouda

The purpose of this paper is to develop strategies of re-imaging the Rosetta historic district through choosing the suitable uses and their specific locations in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop strategies of re-imaging the Rosetta historic district through choosing the suitable uses and their specific locations in compliance with the urban design fabric of the historic core. These strategies are to be fulfilled using Space Syntax as an urban analysis tool, in the context of “connectivity analysis.”

Design/methodology/approach

The research methodology follows the combined strategy between three methods of research: a SWOT analysis, to reveal the historic core status; an experimental research approach, which stimulates the chosen area via Space Syntax; and the third is a case study of the Rosetta historic core.

Findings

The re-usage of the Rosetta old core was not originally planned as commercial and to host movable vendors, but the core was forced to adapt afterwards to suit this usage, while the Souk and those big new residential building urban blocks have clearly deformed the historic image of the Rosetta historic core. Moving from one space to another, it was found that well-connected spaces have higher movement density, such as Al Souk Street, while less dense spaces can tolerate more movement without conflicting with highly dense ones. The existing commercial activities can be classified into movable activities – which can be easily relocated – and shop-based, which need a developmental approach in their original locations. The disconnected district can be used as a commercial zone for the movable vendors, to which human flow can be successfully directed in order to reduce the density in the more connected spaces.

Originality/value

The research value lies in exploring how to re-image urban heritage via relocating the places reused with unsuitable activities through Space Syntax.

Details

Archnet-IJAR: International Journal of Architectural Research, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2631-6862

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Handbook of Transport and the Environment
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-080-44103-0

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Article

Catering for the distribution needs of a wide range of clients, from the smaller retailer and supplier to the major High Street multiple, NCL includes amongst its clients…

Abstract

Catering for the distribution needs of a wide range of clients, from the smaller retailer and supplier to the major High Street multiple, NCL includes amongst its clients Woolworth, Boots, Carrington Viyella, and Marks & Spencer. Originating from British Railways and a subsidiary of the National Freight Corporation, NCL has the advantage of more than a hundred depots located in town centres, and a back‐up of 7,000 vehicles. Its latest venture is the launch of Fashionflow, a specialised distribution operation for hanging garments.

Details

Retail and Distribution Management, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-2363

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Article

Michelle Lowe

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of the West Quay shopping centre development on the city of Southampton.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of the West Quay shopping centre development on the city of Southampton.

Design/methodology/approach

The West Quay scheme parallels recent high‐profile openings of “regional shopping centres” in city centre locations (e.g. Birmingham's Bullring and Reading's Oracle), and like those centres has had a significant impact on the image and external appeal of the city. Using a combination of material from personal interviews with key players in the Southampton retail scene, statistical data collected by Hammerson (the owners of West Quay), and city centre health check information, the paper offers an assessment of the impact of the regional in‐town centre on Southampton more broadly and on the city centre specifically.

Findings

Evidence suggests that the local effects of the centre's opening have not been as detrimental as was feared and that West Quay appears to be generating considerable synergy with Southampton's existing city centre. In addition, there are a number of important developments in the pipeline that owe their raison d'être to West Quay.

Research limitations/implications

The paper does not record the views of consumers and a future task must be to document and evaluate consumer's opinions of West Quay and incorporate these insights into future assessments of regional in‐town centres.

Originality/value

The paper provides a benchmark of “impacts” to date and a resource for other cities with similar in‐town schemes moving forward.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 33 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article

Sarah Wise and Sue Bond

Policies which help employees balance their work and non‐work priorities have become increasingly popular among UK employers in recent years. Along with a legislative…

Abstract

Policies which help employees balance their work and non‐work priorities have become increasingly popular among UK employers in recent years. Along with a legislative imperative for family leave‐related policies, employers are being encouraged to introduce work‐life policies and make them more inclusive in order to enhance their business performance. This paper looks at how four financial services organisations have approached the work‐life balance agenda and examines the fit between the organisational intentions for work‐life policy and actual outcomes for both organisations and employees. Culture played a large part in determining the experience of policies but so did resources. What managers were being asked to achieve in the business was often incompatible with formal work‐life policies. Despite the rhetoric, work‐life balance was still viewed as a tool for, and was used by female parents, limiting its potential to achieve the promoted business benefits.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 18 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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Article

Gary Warnaby

This paper seeks to investigate the use of town centre guides as a device for the representation of urban shopping destinations.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to investigate the use of town centre guides as a device for the representation of urban shopping destinations.

Design/methodology/approach

Following a review of the relevant academic literature in the areas of cartography and place marketing, the paper considers the use of graphic interface elements of scale, projection and symbolisation in the specific context of maps in town centre guides. The guides are drawn from various UK locations reflecting different levels of the retail hierarchy and different locational “archetypes” as identified by URBED.

Findings

The level of detail and content of maps in town centre guides studied varied significantly. All the graphic interface elements of scale, projection and symbolisation were incorporated. Projection was usually oblique, and in some maps isometric. Regarding symbolisation, the most important variables were shape and hue.

Research limitations/implications

This is an exploratory investigation using a limited number of town centre guides. An agenda for further research, focusing on issues in relation to the production and consumption of maps in this context, is presented.

Practical implications

The paper provides place marketing practitioners with guidance as to the development of town centre marketing/promotional material, which may incorporate maps.

Originality/value

Town centre guides are an important and commonly used promotional mechanism for urban retail provision. This paper considers issues relating to the use of a crucial component of these guides, namely cartographic representations of the town cente.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 36 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article

Lantana M. Usman

The purpose of this paper is to provide a qualitative explanation, understanding, and policy suggestions on the socio‐economic causes, effects, and challenges facing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a qualitative explanation, understanding, and policy suggestions on the socio‐economic causes, effects, and challenges facing nomadic rural girls' street hawking in cities of Northern Nigeria. The aim is to present the paper as a source of literature that will serve as a future document in formulating inclusive policies for the girls as explained in the section on educational policy options.

Design/methodology/approach

Research orientation and design involved qualitative phenomenology that explored girls' street hawking experiences. Study sites included three major Nigerian cities and three villages of the girls. Purposeful sampling was used to select 20 girls between ages eight and 15 and female parents as primary participants, while two traditional and religious leaders from each of the villages, and one administrator of the local state nomadic education commission served as secondary participants. Snowball samples of three male parents of the girls in each village were used as part of data validity. Data collection technique involved unstructured focus group interviews, participant observations, and video recording of the girls at home, at markets, and at streets in the cities. Ethical issues were addressed by obtaining oral and written consent of participants orally and in writing using the native language for clarity and understanding of their role. Data analysis of interview involved transcription and the repeated reading of the transcripts that identified major themes. Observational data were converted to field notes and analyzed for patterns of ideas that support major themes of the analyzed interview data for validity. Triangulation process of checking validity was used with sample of snowball participants as state educational administrators of nomadic education, religious leaders, amongst others.

Findings

Major findings are presented as themes on major economic causes of the girls' street hawking of dairy products as a part of family gender division of labor, poverty level of most families, preparing girls for self‐reliance and economic independence, and to augment family income. Social causes include Islamic religious pressure of teaching youth self‐reliance in preparation for early marriage, to finance wedding expenses, to acquire material possessions as child brides, for family honor, to accrue income to maintain their bodily aesthetic needs, group street hawking as a means to girls socialization, and exposing girls to suitors as future husbands, amongst others. Challenges facing the girls include lack of safety, exposure to forms of abuse, and being left behind in basic literacy, amongst others.

Originality/value

This paper is of significant value due to its novelty. It will serve as primary literature on minority West African pastoral girls' impact on rural‐urban migration, their challenges, and their position in the current world social policy of the Department for International Development and UNICEF Girls Education Project.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 37 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

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