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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

Philip Morgan and Jackie Lawson

Since 2010, Dorset HealthCare University NHS Trust has been running a Hidden Talents project seeking to better understand how mental health services can value the lived

Abstract

Purpose

Since 2010, Dorset HealthCare University NHS Trust has been running a Hidden Talents project seeking to better understand how mental health services can value the lived experience of their staff. The purpose of this paper is to inform discussions on how clinicians and other staff can share their lived experience of mental health problems to improve the experience of people who access services, their carers and supporters and promote the wellbeing of all staff.

Design/methodology/approach

The discussion paper was developed through the use of qualitative data collected through three focus groups. One of the focus groups represented people who are part of the Hidden Talents Project, one focus group had representatives of the different professional bodies and the third represented people who access services.

Findings

It was identified that there were two differing considerations between sharing personal experience one was sharing with people who access services, the other was sharing with colleagues and managers. It was identified that in order to safely share personal experience it needed to happen in an supportive organisational culture. A number of suggestions were made as to considered why, when, how and what to share with people who access services.

Research limitations/implications

This is not a formal piece of research, rather it is an exploration of a range of views and set out into a discussion document. Further action and research is required to explore this topic area in more detail.

Originality/value

At present a number of mental health services are beginning to address the value of lived experience in the workforce. Very little has been published exploring how people can share their live experience. This paper provides a starting point for these discussions.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

Open Access

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the use of lived experience research in peer work.

Design/methodology/approach

A suite of user-friendly and engaging lived experience research resources was introduced to consumers by peer workers. In-depth interviews were conducted with 33 consumer participants and five peer workers about their experiences. The data were analysed using qualitative content analysis.

Findings

The role of the peer workers appeared critical in ensuring that participants, despite their varied needs, preferences and backgrounds, derived optimum benefit from each resource. Features in resource delivery that promoted a positive experience included presenting the resources in the context of an existing relationship, providing clear explanations, going through resources together, encouraging reflection, taking enough time; and flexible delivery. Peer workers viewed the resources as potentially useful in their everyday peer work and as a valuable addition to their peer work toolkit.

Practical implications

The benefit of lived experience research to consumers is likely to be optimised by supportive and thoughtful delivery of the resources. Peer workers have the skills and are in an ideal position to do this. Bringing lived experience research to consumers provides peer workers with a potentially unique and helpful approach for supporting and promoting recovery and is congruent with their overall practice.

Originality/value

Lived experience research has the potential to benefit consumers directly but is rarely brought to their attention. This paper is the first to examine the potential role of peer workers in introducing learnings from lived experience research to consumers.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 22 June 2012

Gayathri Wijesinghe

This chapter examines how hospitality and tourism researchers can use ‘expressive text’ (or writing) to express the lived quality of an experience in order to ‘show what…

Abstract

This chapter examines how hospitality and tourism researchers can use ‘expressive text’ (or writing) to express the lived quality of an experience in order to ‘show what an experience is really like’ rather than ‘tell what it is like’. Expressive text refers to written language forms such as narrative, poetry and metaphor that can be used as tools in research to vividly represent the meaning and feeling conveyed in an experience. The expressive text-based approach to researching lived experience provides a textual link between experience and its expression. For this reason, it is especially useful when working with lived experience accounts of phenomenological and hermeneutic research.

The expressive text-based approach suggested here is still a relatively under explored arena within hospitality and tourism research. As a relatively under explored arena, the rich insightful knowledge that can be gained from understanding practitioner experience is rarely a central focus of scholarly writings about the workplace in hospitality and tourism contexts. However, in order to be fully appreciated as a discipline in its own right and to advance knowledge of the field, understanding the typical and significant attributes of hospitality and tourism work will be decidedly helpful.

One of the difficulties of working with lived experience accounts is finding a suitable research approach that helps to both retain the lived elements of the experience and ensure the rigour of the inquiry. An expressive text-based methodological framework that has a phenomenological and hermeneutic philosophical underpinning is argued to be suitable for this purpose. Therefore, the focus of this study is to discuss such a methodology and explain the reasons for its content, style and structure in researching lived experience. The approach that is proposed here consists of a five-tiered textually expressive methodology that is employed to contextualise, portray and interpret the lived experience meanings in order to understand the significance of the experience in relation to relevant discourses in hospitality and tourism studies, and to consider implications for policy and professional practice. The guiding questions of the five-tiered framework cover the following issues: (1) What is the context of the lived experience? (2) What is the lived experience of this practice like? (3) What is the meaning of this experience for the practitioner? (4) What is the significance of the experience in contributing to the advancement of knowledge within the field? (5) What are the implications for practice and professional development?

To illustrate uses of this methodology in research, the study here includes an example showing portrayals and interpretations of the typical and significant lived nature of hospitality reception work. This shows and communicates the full meaning of the episode, circumstances or situation. The chapter then concludes with some reflections on benefits as well as tensions in working within an expressive text-based phenomenological and hermeneutic framework.

Details

Field Guide to Case Study Research in Tourism, Hospitality and Leisure
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-742-0

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 March 2014

Dina Abbott and Gordon Wilson

The purpose of this paper is to explore the importance of lived experiences, as complementary knowledge to that provided by the sciences, for policy and intervention on…

2269

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the importance of lived experiences, as complementary knowledge to that provided by the sciences, for policy and intervention on climate change.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual paper draws on several strands within the context of climate change: knowledge and power; human engagement; the meaning of “lived experience” (and its association with “local/indigenous knowledge”); its capture through interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary inquiry; post-normal science; rationalist and public action approaches to policy and intervention. The paper combines these strands from their different literatures, previous work by the authors and interdisciplinary deliberation in a European climate change education project.

Findings

The case is made for taking account of lived experiences in climate change policy and intervention, and the dangers of not doing so. The paper, however, also identifies the challenge of establishing the validity of lived experience alongside forms of scientifically derived knowledge, and the practical challenge of capturing it in a form that is accessible to practitioners. It concludes by arguing that a public action approach to policy provides a better lens than the conventional rationalist approach to analyse the contested nature of climate science and the potential of lived experience to inform debates through active engagement.

Research limitations/implications

There has been no empirical study on climate change that addresses the research concerns. This would be necessary to forward the paper's agenda.

Practical implications

The paper makes a case for formalising evidence that is based on lived experience in policy making and intervention, and the approach that is needed.

Originality/value

The work develops the concept of lived experience in the context of climate change. Its public action theory of knowledge provides a novel means of analysing and meeting the challenge of diverse knowledge on climate change.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 13 May 2020

Chiara Rossato and Paola Castellani

This paper aims to examine how long-lived firms can further develop through digitalisation in terms of actions, conditions and effects from a competitiveness perspective.

3892

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine how long-lived firms can further develop through digitalisation in terms of actions, conditions and effects from a competitiveness perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

This exploratory study follows an inductive approach based on a survey conducted via interviews undertaken with nine long-lived Italian firms. The dimensions of the model (command, continuity, community, connection), elaborated by Miller and Le Breton-Miller (2005) in relation to longevity factors, were chosen to analyse digitalisation’s contribution to these long-lived firms’ development.

Findings

The digitalisation implemented by the analysed firms contributed in a variety of ways: (1) improved the efficiency and effectiveness of their business processes, (2) enhanced the understanding of customer experience, (3) supported their craftsmanship and the transmission of the knowledge included in the entrepreneurial path, (4) increased the awareness of the cultural value of the firms’ heritage and (5) allowed for the development of cutting-edge design skills by experimenting with content on different digital platforms and devices.

Practical implications

This study suggests managers of long-lived firms develop digital skills that allow them to interact with the rapid evolution of this context and understand how to effectively implement digitalisation in their specific firm. From this perspective, it is strategic to establish or strengthen collaborative network relationships to acquire such necessary skills.

Originality/value

This study provides novel empirical evidence on how long-lived firms are facing the challenge of digitalisation in terms of actions, conditions and effects to improve their competitiveness and ensure their survival.

Article
Publication date: 10 August 2015

Sarah Paynter and Christine Rivers

The purpose of this paper is to examine the surrounding attitudes, culture and workplace environment in which Oxleas NHS Foundation trust developed a network for staff…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the surrounding attitudes, culture and workplace environment in which Oxleas NHS Foundation trust developed a network for staff with lived experience of mental ill health.

Design/methodology/approach

Sarah Paynter completed an interview talking about her experiences with a peer, which was recorded, then the authors picked out relevant themes from this which are grounded in lived experience. The paper examines the theme of lived experience in the workplace in more depth, from a personal perspective (Sarah) and from an organisational perspective (Christine).

Findings

There is a lack of dialogue about staff lived experience of mental ill health within the workplace. There are compelling reasons from both the perspective of the organisation and staff with lived experience for setting up a lived experience staff network. The authors note that increased dialogue and visibility has added value on both sides.

Originality/value

This is a relatively new initiative in the NHS, and particularly in mental health trusts. The authors speak from their experiences in Oxleas NHS Foundation Trust. This is of value to organisations looking to start dialogue and therefore improve the experiences of staff and the quality of the organisation.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 February 2018

Richard Schweizer, Ellen Marks and Rob Ramjan

Recently, the importance of a lived experience workforce in the delivery of mental health services has been demonstrated. The roll-out of the National Disability Insurance…

Abstract

Purpose

Recently, the importance of a lived experience workforce in the delivery of mental health services has been demonstrated. The roll-out of the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) in Australia has generated the need for a significant increase in the disability workforce, including psychosocial disability. The purpose of this paper is to describe the strategies outlined in the One Door Mental Health Lived Experience Framework (LEF), which is the culmination of over 30 years of experience in providing mental health services and the employment of a lived experience workforce.

Design/methodology/approach

One Door developed and implemented the LEF, a thorough guide to the employment and support of a workforce of people with lived experience of mental illness, through consultation with consumers, carers, stakeholders, practice advisors, management, human resources and employee focus groups.

Findings

Extensive support structures in the LEF are key to achieving the benefits of a lived experience workforce. The LEF has positioned One Door successfully for the achievement of key organisational goals in mental health support and advocacy.

Research limitations/implications

Mental health policies and support are critical for productivity outcomes in any workplace regardless of the level of lived experience of the employees. This paper provides organisations, particularly those within the mental health sector, an example to build on in their own employment and support strategies.

Originality/value

This paper is of particular value in the context of organisations in the mental health sector transitioning to the NDIS.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 November 2021

Talya Postelnik, Rhonda Robertson, Angela Jury, Heather Kongs-Taylor, Sarah Hetrick and Charito Tuason

Mental health literacy programmes can help reduce stigma towards people who experience mental health challenges. Co-facilitated mental health literacy programmes…

Abstract

Purpose

Mental health literacy programmes can help reduce stigma towards people who experience mental health challenges. Co-facilitated mental health literacy programmes, delivered by a person with lived experience of mental health challenges in partnership with a person with clinical experience in mental health services, may further reduce stigma. This qualitative study aims to explore participants’ satisfaction with a co-facilitated mental health literacy programme and facilitator characteristics influencing satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used deidentified post-workshop evaluation data from 762 community mental health literacy programme participants (86% response rate). Thematic analysis of qualitative data used a general inductive approach.

Findings

Findings indicate high satisfaction with the co-facilitation model used to deliver a mental health literacy programme. Three key themes related to co-facilitation satisfaction: how participants perceived the co-facilitation model overall; the impact of having two facilitators that offered different knowledge and perspectives about mental health challenges; and the impact of personal stories shared. The personal stories shared by facilitators were perceived as bringing the workshop content to life and providing insights into people’s experiences and well-being journey. Key themes influencing co-facilitation satisfaction related to facilitator knowledge, skills, values and attitudes.

Practical implications

Findings indicate the positive impact of incorporating people’s lived experience into the design and delivery of mental health literacy programmes. Findings highlight key facilitator characteristics and support needs when recruiting facilitators to deliver programmes. This includes good facilitation skills alongside personal experiences.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first large study examining satisfaction with a co-facilitated mental health literacy programme for the general public.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 August 2021

Hannah Kate Lewis and Una Foye

The current policy landscape advocates for the involvement of people with lived experience in the co-production and co-delivery of mental health services. However…

Abstract

Purpose

The current policy landscape advocates for the involvement of people with lived experience in the co-production and co-delivery of mental health services. However, evidence on how to do this safely and effectively for people with eating disorders (EDs) is lacking. The purpose of this study was to explore and synthesis the implementation of ED interventions which involved lived-experience and to evaluate the associated benefits and risks to participants.

Design/methodology/approach

This study will conduct a systematic review of ED interventions which involve people with lived experience of an ED. A total of seven databases and four subject-specific journals were searched using Boolean search terms.

Findings

The search yielded ten eligible studies. Involvement procedures were extracted which highlighted variation with some roles being continuous and active and others being isolated and passive. Qualitative results were extracted and thematically analysed which demonstrated many benefits from involving people with lived experience, such as normalisation of experiences, inspiration to recover and the sharing of insight, as well as some risks such as disingenuity and exposure to triggering content.

Practical implications

The implications of this review highlight the need for policy and guidance to minimise variation across procedures and implementation of co-production to ensure positive outcomes and benefits for participants, given the current landscape. More research in the benefits and risks for those involved in the delivery of the interventions is needed to ensure that co-production and peer support is delivered as safely and effectively as possible.

Originality/value

This was the first systematic review since 2016 (Fogarty et al., 2016) to assess peer-mentorship programmes in ED treatments, whilst expanding the remit to include wider definitions of peer-support and peer-mentorships such as co-production and co-design in research.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 August 2021

Shaista E. Khilji

Inequality is an important organizational phenomenon. Scholars have argued that inequalities persistently dwell in the flow of our lives and have a lingering impact. Yet…

Abstract

Purpose

Inequality is an important organizational phenomenon. Scholars have argued that inequalities persistently dwell in the flow of our lives and have a lingering impact. Yet, despite such compelling evidence, research has overlooked how individuals make sense of the inequalities they face inside and outside the organizations. The purpose of this paper was to address these gaps and capture its complexity on individual lived experiences with inequalities.

Design/methodology/approach

The present study used Seidman's adapted 2-interview strategy to collect the data. The first interview placed the participant's life history at the center, allowing the participant to share their childhood and adulthood experiences with inequalities inside and outside the organizations. The second interview focused on the concrete details of the participant's present lived experience and their reflections on the meaning of their experiences. In total, the present study relied on 26 interviews with 13 participants.

Findings

Lived experiences provided an extended-time view and allowed the researcher to explore how study participants perceived, coped and were shaped by inequalities throughout their lives. In addition, the sense-making perspective offered a new lens to study inequalities. Findings underscore the racial, class and gendered dynamics within organizations supporting their intersectional impact and acknowledge the pre-existing societal norms that condition individual actions and choices.

Originality/value

The study presents an “engaged” view of inequality to highlight it as a cumulative and complex experience. The findings help us recognize that participants are immersed in their specific contexts to act, negotiate, empower and make decisions under real-life pressures. Overall, the study pushes the boundaries of inequality research beyond its current episodic treatment.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 40 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

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